Stopping heel rub wear on crank arm
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  1. #1
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    Stopping heel rub wear on crank arm

    I get some heel rub wear on my crank arm. I don't notice it happening (I think it's only when I stand up because I sort of fold in my ankles when standing), am very comfortable with my cleat setting so would prefer to not monkey around and mess with success and fix it with cleat position.

    Any suggestions for something to put on my crank arm to prevent what is now just a blemish from turning into a gouge with further wear?

    I don't really care about looks per se but something less ghetto that duct tape would be nice.

    How about clear nail polish? Or maybe cut up one of those clear chain stay protectors and stick that on there?

    I'd be interested to hear what was used if any of you have successfully guarded there crank from heel rub wear.

    It's an alloy crank. One is DA and the other Ultegra.

    thank you.

  2. #2
    tlg
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    Helicopter tape is what you're looking for. Google it. Type it in amazon.



    Also most auto parts stores sell paint protection film. Which is essentially the same thing.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

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    Cool thank you. Sounds perfect.

    per google: "It was designed to protect helicopter rotors and the leading edges of airplane wings"

    A light rub from leather with my pedaling will obviously be no issue then.

  4. #4
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    A light rub from leather with my pedaling will obviously be no issue then.
    Nope no issue. The stuff is pretty thick and durable. And if it does wear, peel it off and re-apply
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Nope no issue. The stuff is pretty thick and durable. And if it does wear, peel it off and re-apply
    Use it for the same reason. Works great. Wish I put it on before wearing of the Dura on my right crank

  6. #6
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    I would adjust your cleats so they can't rub, it's really easy to do.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    I would adjust your cleats so they can't rub, it's really easy to do.
    That's what I would do, but he said he doesn't want to mess with his cleat position is it works for him (other than rubbing his crank arms).
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That's what I would do, but he said he doesn't want to mess with his cleat position is it works for him (other than rubbing his crank arms).
    Yeah, I read that but really don't understand. It's not going to effect his fit on the bike, his heal is going in any closer than the crank arms anyway. Just need to mark their position so they don't get move front or back, just change the angle not move them out.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Yeah, I read that but really don't understand. It's not going to effect his fit on the bike, his heal is going in any closer than the crank arms anyway. Just need to mark their position so they don't get move front or back, just change the angle not move them out.
    Hmmm. Changing the angle won't necessarily solve this problem. If there is float, your foot will just turn at the angle that feels most natural. If little to no float, it may create knee problems.

    I am pigeon toed and use SPD's. If the cleats are adjusted straight, they make an annoying squeaking noise.

    If Jay is getting heel rub, he is most likely duck footed.

    If I were to make any adjustments, I would move the cleat sideways a bit, but not mess with the angle.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Yeah, I read that but really don't understand. It's not going to effect his fit on the bike, his heal is going in any closer than the crank arms anyway. Just need to mark their position so they don't get move front or back, just change the angle not move them out.
    Fit on the bike is not the issue. Moving cleats will either change where float starts and ends (by moving angle) or where my leg is above the pedal (by moving side to side). My knees are such that I probably couldn't play 5 min. of basketball, but I can ride about 10,000 miles a year without any issues as set up now so I am not going to tinker with cleat position to fix something that is not a problem (other than potentially wearing a gouge into the crank arm eventually).

    Edit to add something I just remembered. When I first started cycling about 10 years ago with cleats I set them up straight so as not to accommodate for my natural tendency to pedal duck footed. In other words I've already tried what would need to be done moving cleats to fix the rub. Let's just say there's a reason I changed from a position with no heal rub and I ain't going back to that cleat position.
    Last edited by Jay Strongbow; 07-17-2019 at 06:07 AM.

  11. #11
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    FUNCTION over form..... bend your crank arm out of the way!

    Perhaps going to pedals with more offset, Q factor?, may be a solution too.
    Last edited by duriel; 07-17-2019 at 06:36 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch16 View Post
    Use it for the same reason. Works great. Wish I put it on before wearing of the Dura on my right crank
    Thanks for the verification.

    I borrowed some nail polish from a lady friend and put that on and will see how long/well that works just for the heck of it but definitely plan to get some helicopter tape for long term

    Now that I think of it that stuff will be very useful to have on hand for other reasons too. Chain stay protection, where cable housings rub on paint and probably some non-cycling related thing where that would be good are bound to pop up eventually.
    Currently using electrical tape to prevent cable housing from rubbing paint on on the head tube and chain stay protector on one bike is pretty chewed up so I'm definitely sold on a getting a roll of the stuff.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Fit on the bike is not the issue. Moving cleats will either change where float starts and ends (by moving angle) or where my leg is above the pedal (by moving side to side). My knees are such that I probably couldn't play 5 min. of basketball, but I can ride about 10,000 miles a year without any issues as set up now so I am not going to tinker with cleat position to fix something that is not a problem (other than potentially wearing a gouge into the crank arm eventually).

    Edit to add something I just remembered. When I first started cycling about 10 years ago with cleats I set them up straight so as not to accommodate for my natural tendency to pedal duck footed. In other words I've already tried what would need to be done moving cleats to fix the rub. Let's just say there's a reason I changed from a position with no heal rub and I ain't going back to that cleat position.
    If it bothered you before it probably will again. I just don't understand it, but don't need to. Seems if you adjust the cleat so the float heal in starts just missing the crank arm, it shouldn't change anything because your heal isn't going in any further than that anyway with the crank arm in the way. The alternative would be move the cleats inward on your shoe to keep them further from the crank arm and retain the same float angle range you have for the non-crank arm portion of your pedal stroke.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    If it bothered you before it probably will again. I just don't understand it, but don't need to. Seems if you adjust the cleat so the float heal in starts just missing the crank arm, it shouldn't change anything because your heal isn't going in any further than that anyway with the crank arm in the way. The alternative would be move the cleats inward on your shoe to keep them further from the crank arm and retain the same float angle range you have for the non-crank arm portion of your pedal stroke.
    Changing where my heel stops rotating inward is changing something. I can't understand how that could be viewed as not changing anything but whatever. That also changes where it stops rotating outward but I never hit that limit so kinda n/a.

    Do you care about cleat position at all or do you just slap them on where ever the happen to land. If the former I think you must understand how moving cleats is changing something.

  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Now that I think of it that stuff will be very useful to have on hand for other reasons too. Chain stay protection, where cable housings rub on paint .
    Definitely. I wrap my entire chain stay with it. Much better than those little stick on ones that never wrap all the way around and always look greasy on the edges. Very easy to clean.

    I also put it on my down tube. If you ever ride after a rain and get worm guts splattered on your down tube, those bastards are a b!tch to scrub off when dried up.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    If Jay is getting heel rub, he is most likely duck footed.

    I'm definitely somewhat duckfooted. I think the word to describe what happens when I stand to pedal is "pronation" and I think that's a factor too.
    I said heel rub to keep it simple but it's actually a spot on my shoe slightly in front of the actual heel that's hitting.

    As an aside. I think Shimano cranks stick out further in that area (I only get it one drive side) than average and it's a fairly common thing for people to experience what I do with them without being radically duckfooted.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Fit on the bike is not the issue. Moving cleats will either change where float starts and ends (by moving angle) or where my leg is above the pedal (by moving side to side). My knees are such that I probably couldn't play 5 min. of basketball, but I can ride about 10,000 miles a year without any issues as set up now so I am not going to tinker with cleat position to fix something that is not a problem (other than potentially wearing a gouge into the crank arm eventually).
    Wise decision to leave cleat position alone. New crank arms are much cheaper and less painful than new knees.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I also put it on my down tube. If you ever ride after a rain and get worm guts splattered on your down tube, those bastards are a b!tch to scrub off when dried up.

    hahaha......for sure have had that happen. Someone in R & D at a glue company needs to look into worm guts.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I'm definitely somewhat duckfooted. I think the word to describe what happens when I stand to pedal is "pronation" and I think that's a factor too.
    I said heel rub to keep it simple but it's actually a spot on my shoe slightly in front of the actual heel that's hitting.
    I have just the opposite issue - supination or being pigeon toed. I obviously don't get crank arm rub, but toe overlap becomes a greater problem.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    If it bothered you before it probably will again. I just don't understand it, but don't need to. Seems if you adjust the cleat so the float heal in starts just missing the crank arm, it shouldn't change anything because your heal isn't going in any further than that anyway with the crank arm in the way. The alternative would be move the cleats inward on your shoe to keep them further from the crank arm and retain the same float angle range you have for the non-crank arm portion of your pedal stroke.
    If he injures that back of his foot, how long will it take his heel to heal?

  21. #21
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    If you don't really care about looks (as you said), you could do what I do: ignore it. It's never going to do any functional harm; your leather shoe will not make a gouge in your aluminum crank arm.
    "None of us knows for sure what's out there; that's why we keep looking. Keep your faith; travel hopefully. The universe will surprise you, constantly." The 13th Doctor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    If you don't really care about looks (as you said), you could do what I do: ignore it. It's never going to do any functional harm; your leather shoe will not make a gouge in your aluminum crank arm.
    I can feel a slight indentation on one of them when running my finger over it. So a gouge is in process. And I have seen bikes where there is definitely wear deep enough to be of concern. Basically, your statement is wrong. Sure it will take a very long time at my rate of slight wear but I want to keep these cranks for that long.

  23. #23
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    You're never.. NEVER... going to wear the tip of the crank off with your shoe/foot. NEVER!
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    You're never.. NEVER... going to wear the tip of the crank off with your shoe/foot. NEVER!
    Tip? Heel, not toe. But that's correct, because I am going to put helicopter tape on it. Whether I would ever wear into the arm, which is hollow, enough to weaken it, I do not know and see no reason to find out.

  25. #25
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    You're never.. NEVER... going to wear the tip of the crank off with your shoe/foot. NEVER!
    The 'tip' isn't the concern. The arm is. And yes... it is possible.
    Even if you don't wear through, reducing the material 10% will reduce the strength 10%. Having ultra light hollow crank arms with very thin cross sections, there's not much material to begin with.

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