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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    tools tools tools

    So I've got a classic Bianchi steel frame with Campy Centaur, and I'm looking to expand my tool selection in order to be able to do all my own bike work.

    Currently I own a multi-tool (with all the allens and such that I need, I guess) and a chain tool. I guess I'd like to be able to pull the cassette, cranks, and do whatever other repairs and replacements I need.

    What tools do I need? In what order would you get them? And how can I get a good price on them? (park tools are horrendously expensive). Also, can one get non cycling-specific tools from a hardware store for less?

    Thanks much.

  2. #2
    rebounder
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    bike tools come in two flavors - blue and yellow. pedros are usually more spendy than park, but both are expensive. to do 'everything' they both make complete sets (in the $800-$900 range, new) but thats probably way more tool than you need. i would amass tools slowly, as you learn how to use them, especially for an older bike. a new kit might not have older style spanners etc. also, if you're really serious about getting a good work station setup at home, think about a stand. its just as important.

    i read on the park website that using adjustable wrenches from your local hardware store will actually cause a bicycle to spontaneously combust
    on the other hand, you have different fingers

  3. #3
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
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    Buy the best tool you can afford as you need them, piece by piece. Don't waste your money on a 'kit'.

  4. #4
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    Buy the best tool you can afford as you need them, piece by piece. Don't waste your money on a 'kit'.
    I disagree. You spend more money piece by piece than on a kit.

  5. #5
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    Some specifics

    -cassette lockring tool.
    -bottom-bracket tool (may be the same as the cassette tool for Campy Centaur)
    -crank puller -- this is generic. Park's is excellent, and reasonably priced
    -pedal wrench -- some people get along without this, but I like having one.
    -if you have a threaded headset, you need headset wrenches. Kind of expensive, but the only substitutes are very large adjustable wrenches, which are versatile but even more expensive. If you have the newer type headset, never mind.
    -cone wrenches for the hubs (maybe -- depends how old your hubs are).
    -allen wrenches. The ones on the multi-tool are okay for raodside emergencies, but typically kind of a pain to use in the shop. You can get a set like this at the hardware store (metric, of course)

    -appropriate wrench for crank bolts, either 15mm socket or 8mm allen.
    -quality screwdrivers, slotted and phillips, various sizes -- hardware store
    -cable cutter -- if you really want to do everything. Here again, no reasonable substitute for the right tool, unfortunately.
    -tire levers, good floor pump with gauge (you probably already have those -- even people who do no maintenance need them).
    -chain lube, grease, another light lube for brake and derailleur pivots and the like.

    That's the major stuff. Park tools aren't really so expensive when you consider the quality and think of them as a long-term investment. I've had some for 25 years. It's a pain working with poor tools.

  6. #6
    hello
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    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonnitro
    I disagree. You spend more money piece by piece than on a kit.
    Of course you end up spending more money in the long run. But that's not the point.
    If you're on a limited budget and want as many tools possible, then get the kit. You'll end up with crappy tools which you'll most likely end up replacing them piece by piece.....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    Of course you end up spending more money in the long run. But that's not the point.
    If you're on a limited budget and want as many tools possible, then get the kit. You'll end up with crappy tools which you'll most likely end up replacing them piece by piece.....
    You can get a Park or Pedro's kit. I don't understand what you are saying. Those would be the brands you would get even if you were getting them piece by piece. Why would you have to buy a crappy kit and replace it over time?

  8. #8
    hello
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleeveleSS
    You can get a Park or Pedro's kit. I don't understand what you are saying. Those would be the brands you would get even if you were getting them piece by piece. Why would you have to buy a crappy kit and replace it over time?
    I was primarily referring to no name generic budget kits.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    I was primarily referring to no name generic budget kits.
    Well, I understand what you meant know, but those obviously aren't the only options. If you have the money for a good kit, it will be cheaper. That's the route I would go.

  10. #10
    jd3
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    The problem with tool kits is you may be buying things you'll never use. Do you really need a campy bb tool if you only have shimano? How long before you give up on the chain cleaner like I did (or read on here that most people do) ?. I have bought the tools I need as I need them (and learned to use them) and have built a nice kit over 2 or 3 years.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jd3
    The problem with tool kits is you may be buying things you'll never use. Do you really need a campy bb tool if you only have shimano? How long before you give up on the chain cleaner like I did (or read on here that most people do) ?. I have bought the tools I need as I need them (and learned to use them) and have built a nice kit over 2 or 3 years.
    Do you know how much you paid? How many tools have you ended up with?

  12. #12
    jd3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SleeveleSS
    Do you know how much you paid? How many tools have you ended up with?
    No I really don't. I've got Campy, SRAM, & old school 5 speed sq taper stuff. So I've collected a bunch of different tools for the different types of parts. Some tools that I thought I would not use much, I bought cheaper stuff. The tools that I thought I would use alot or would need to be high quality (like cable cutters), I bought Park. One thing that I think you really need is a GOOD set of metric allen wrenches. I've got the ones that are a set fixed together, but there are places that are much easier to get to with a single wrench.

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