Ultegra 8000 cable replacement preventive maintenance - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    While this is true in an absolute sense, it bears little relevance to the issue at hand. Any standard grease will work and will not degrade the plastics used in cable liners or cable coatings.
    Do you know which plastics are used in cable coatings and housing liners? What is a "standard grease"
    Folks may want to peek at this document below if they want a more definitive explanation on grease compatibility with plastics. Also beware of "typical grease" and many rubber compounds.

    There are some very bad combinations, and many safe ones. Without knowing exactly what plastic and what grease is involved, I could not tell anyone "it's safe".

    What is safe, for me, is to use what the manufacturer of the cable system recommends.

    https://www.ecllube.com/resources-fo...20Plastics.pdf

  2. #27
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    I usually do my Dura Ace cables every 2-2.5k. Only ever seen one strand frayed but I ride mostly flat terrain and might not shift as much as you. Even though I don’t see fray, shift performance degrades by this point.

  3. #28
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    Here's another 2 page overview that discusses "Lubricants for control cables"
    and talks about that applications special requirements. Almost all their recommended lubes use PTFE
    https://www.nyelubricants.com/stuff/...rol_cables.pdf
    Nye’s fluorocarbon gels, for example, incorporate PTFE which creates a surface with a very low coefficient of friction and aids in supporting medium and heavily loaded cables to reduce wear.

    We also offer greases for push-pull cables. They feature a unique combination of silicone oils and PTFE gelling agents which provide excellent cable wetting, very low friction, and load-carrying capabilities.



  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisisthebeave View Post
    I usually do my Dura Ace cables every 2-2.5k. Only ever seen one strand frayed but I ride mostly flat terrain and might not shift as much as you. Even though I don’t see fray, shift performance degrades by this point.
    2-2.5k??? That's not even half a year for me. Not feeling it.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z'mer View Post
    Do you know which plastics are used in cable coatings and housing liners? What is a "standard grease"
    Folks may want to peek at this document below if they want a more definitive explanation on grease compatibility with plastics. Also beware of "typical grease" and many rubber compounds.

    There are some very bad combinations, and many safe ones. Without knowing exactly what plastic and what grease is involved, I could not tell anyone "it's safe".

    What is safe, for me, is to use what the manufacturer of the cable system recommends.

    https://www.ecllube.com/resources-fo...20Plastics.pdf
    I just use white silicone (the kind they use for machines in the food industry). Safe and nontoxic, no odorless, and very decent lubrication. I stay away from these "automotive" grease because of their smell and toxicity.

  6. #31
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    2-2.5k??? That's not even half a year for me. Not feeling it.
    You'll get a feeling for how long yours will last after they do start to fray, then replace them based on that mileage.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You'll get a feeling for how long yours will last after they do start to fray, then replace them based on that mileage.
    I put in around 10k-12k/yr spread out between 3 bikes primarily (fourth bike is a little bit of a trainer queen so no count). So what I do is buy a roll of "generic" Jagwire shift housing and a boatload of stainless steel shift cables. For grease, I use food-grade silicone. Honestly, I cannot tell the difference between the Dura Ace slickity-slick cables the generic stainless steel cable with silicone. Because i bought these stainless cables in bulk on ebay for cheap (like $1 per cable), I usually change them out yearly, not because they start to fray, but more like I just want to tinker with my bike. This approach saves me the worry of having to examine the cables, because when in doubt, throw in a new cable for $1 bux.

  8. #33
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    Thanks everyone. I did read this earlier, but didn't respond. I'm not seeing how to look at the cable but I'll be the first to admit I don't know anything about road bike shifters. To me, these Ultegra 8000 seem to cover up the cable pretty well. And it is all internally routed, even through the chainstay.

    I was curious about trying new bars, so the shift-cable recommendation convinced me to go ahead and buy some and then I'll just take the shifter off so I can hold it in my hands and figure it out. Always nice to put on some fresh bar-tape also.

    I'm sensing a couple people putting digs on Shimano about this, but I like Shimano even if I should replace a shift cable every couple thousand miles. (I'm overweight in hilly Pittsburgh, so yes I shift a LOT.) I hope after doing it once, it'll be pretty easy to replace a cable every couple years.

    Thanks again!

  9. #34
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed View Post
    Thanks everyone. I did read this earlier, but didn't respond. I'm not seeing how to look at the cable but I'll be the first to admit I don't know anything about road bike shifters. To me, these Ultegra 8000 seem to cover up the cable pretty well. And it is all internally routed, even through the chainstay.

    I was curious about trying new bars, so the shift-cable recommendation convinced me to go ahead and buy some and then I'll just take the shifter off so I can hold it in my hands and figure it out. Always nice to put on some fresh bar-tape also.

    I'm sensing a couple people putting digs on Shimano about this, but I like Shimano even if I should replace a shift cable every couple thousand miles. (I'm overweight in hilly Pittsburgh, so yes I shift a LOT.) I hope after doing it once, it'll be pretty easy to replace a cable every couple years.

    Thanks again!
    Pull the hood forward from the back (handlebar side) of the shifter. On the left side of the right shifter there is a small cover you can pop off and see the cable. Generally if it's frayed you'll be able to see it there.
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Pull the hood forward from the back (handlebar side) of the shifter. On the left side of the right shifter there is a small cover you can pop off and see the cable. Generally if it's frayed you'll be able to see it there.
    Make sure you are in the small cog on the back when you look though, the wear that causes breaks most often happens at the end of the cable which isn't going to be as visible in the bigger cogs. When you are in the small cog you can also look inside the hole on the outboard side of the shifter and check for cable splintering. There I would shift from the small to the next smallest and back while looking at the cable.
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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed View Post
    I hope after doing it once, it'll be pretty easy to replace a cable every couple years.
    Again, passage of time has nothing to do with cable wear.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    I put in around 10k-12k/yr spread out between 3 bikes primarily (fourth bike is a little bit of a trainer queen so no count). So what I do is buy a roll of "generic" Jagwire shift housing and a boatload of stainless steel shift cables. For grease, I use food-grade silicone. Honestly, I cannot tell the difference between the Dura Ace slickity-slick cables the generic stainless steel cable with silicone. Because i bought these stainless cables in bulk on ebay for cheap (like $1 per cable), I usually change them out yearly, not because they start to fray, but more like I just want to tinker with my bike. This approach saves me the worry of having to examine the cables, because when in doubt, throw in a new cable for $1 bux.
    What about these polished stainless steel cables? Do they give lower friction? I'm thinking maybe not when they have silicone grease on them.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    What about these polished stainless steel cables? Do they give lower friction? I'm thinking maybe not when they have silicone grease on them.
    Probably not. Just make sure they are stainless steel, not the cheaper galvanized cables.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  14. #39
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    Perhaps Di2 arose as a fix for cable eating shifters.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bremerradkurier View Post
    Perhaps Di2 arose as a fix for cable eating shifters.
    That would be pretty lame. Let me just say that while I dismiss most conspiracy theories, one has to wonder why Shimano hasn't been able to solve the cable eating shifter problem for 3 generations of components.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That would be pretty lame. Let me just say that while I dismiss most conspiracy theories, one has to wonder why Shimano hasn't been able to solve the cable eating shifter problem for 3 generations of components.
    It's probably my #1 reason for going Di2 on all my bikes. I don't know if it's a conspiracy but it's a great selling feature.

    18,000mi. Ride year round in all conditions. Never replaced a cable. Never made a single shift adjustment. Shifting is exactly the same as day #1
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