Wheel Building - Disc / Non-Disc Hubs
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  1. #1
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    Wheel Building - Disc / Non-Disc Hubs

    I am planning to build some touring wheels with LX or XT hubs and I am going to use V Brakes. Although I don't need disc hubs, I was wondering if a disc hub would be preferable for the rear wheel because the spokes are closer to the same length on the drive and non-drive sides. My thinking is that this should provide more even tension spoke tension and a more reliable wheel. This is the opposite of the front wheel where a non-disc hub allows the same length spokes on each side, but a disc front hub requires the use of different length spokes. Therefore, would the ideal setup be a wheelset with a disc rear hub and a non-disc front hub? Also, if this is all true, why don't hub manufacturers just put the left flange of non-disc hubs closer to the center so that there is less dish required?

  2. #2
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    Shortening the NDS spokes just makes the NDS side as weak as the DS. That isn't advantageous.

  3. #3
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    poor bracing angle

  4. #4
    your text here
    Reputation: weltyed's Avatar
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    i know a lot of people talked up the advantage of even spoke tension in the back wheel. there will be less dish, which makes building a tad bit easier. i had no trouble building a front disc wheel, but eth dish on a rear road wheel gave me some trouble. havent built a rear disc wheel.
    yet.
    if you have a hub, use it. if you might someday use a disc, get a disc hub.
    I don't normally "do people." - Dr. Roebuck

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by weltyed
    i know a lot of people talked up the advantage of even spoke tension in the back wheel. there will be less dish, which makes building a tad bit easier. i had no trouble building a front disc wheel, but eth dish on a rear road wheel gave me some trouble. havent built a rear disc wheel.
    yet.
    if you have a hub, use it. if you might someday use a disc, get a disc hub.
    Even spoke tension is good, because if done the right way it lowers the tension on the DS spokes, like on off center style rims. But shortening the NDS spokes alone just raises the tension on that side, giving you two weak sides. Total strength just goes down. That isn't a gain.

    Building a rear wheel shouldn't be any harder than a front wheel if you are using good wheelbuilding practices. You can also tension the right side first and load it the rest of the way up when you tension the NDS.


    Personally, I think a hub with a big unused flange hanging off of it looks silly. Of course, I don't understand why anyone would want to use MTB hubs on a touring bike. There are plenty of strong 130mm hubs that will give you better chainline.

  6. #6
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    Ok. I can see how shortening the NDS spokes could result in wheel that is more vulnerable to laterally forces. Regarding the use of MTB hubs... I usually see XT or LX hubs cheaper than 105 or Ultegra and I am not sure that road hubs would give me a better chainline, since I am using an MTB triple crank on this bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rx-79g
    Of course, I don't understand why anyone would want to use MTB hubs on a touring bike. There are plenty of strong 130mm hubs that will give you better chainline.
    If you can find 130 mm hubs with disc brake mounts (and preferably a Campagnolo freehub) please tell me where.

    The only ones I can find are DT swiss and I refuse to buy a hub that can't be overhauled with normal tools to put on a touring bike.

    Edit: I take it back, it looks like Velocity make exactly what I'm after. Google to the rescue again.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Kelly
    If you can find 130 mm hubs with disc brake mounts (and preferably a Campagnolo freehub) please tell me where.

    The only ones I can find are DT swiss and I refuse to buy a hub that can't be overhauled with normal tools to put on a touring bike.

    Edit: I take it back, it looks like Velocity make exactly what I'm after. Google to the rescue again.
    Who said anything about using disc brakes on a 130 hub?


    Snowedin,
    The chain line is whatever you want it to be. You might be using a mountain crank, but unless you have a 73 MTB BB shell, you'll probably be using a spindle length appropriate for a road triple and road triple chain line.

  9. #9
    Beetpull DeLite
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    Quote Originally Posted by rx-79g
    Who said anything about using disc brakes on a 130 hub?
    Uh, he's talking about discs on a road bike forum, so I'm guessing he assumed the OP needed a 130mm road hub rather than a 135mm mtn hub.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GirchyGirchy
    Uh, he's talking about discs on a road bike forum, so I'm guessing he assumed the OP needed a 130mm road hub rather than a 135mm mtn hub.
    But, uh, the OP isn't using discs at all.

    Pretty, uh, clear if you read the thread that that only reason discs came up is that the hubs the OP is looking at came with a disc option and he wanted to know if disc hubs make for a stronger wheel.

  11. #11
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    I could have gone either way with this frame...132.5 mm dropouts. However, I am likely going to use MTB hubs, due to price, durability, and my cranks. (rx-79g - my BB shell is 68mm, but I'm using an external bearing BB crankset with a 50mm chainline.)

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