Calculate max tire width frame can accomodate
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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Calculate max tire width frame can accomodate

    hi all,
    Been a LONG time since I've been here or posted. Nice to be back.

    Seeking input on how best to figure out the max tire size my frame can run, without the trial/error of buying a bunch of tires and seeing what fits.

    I realize there will be some error, even with calculations, as different tires aren't true to their nominal markings. But I'd like to get a ballpark sense of whether I can run true to size 35s, 38s, 40s, 42s?

    I'm looking to maximize tire size to add a bit of cush for gravel, single track, adventure, etc. NOT for racing, although I can see how that might come in handy as well.

    I have a set of digital calipers, so what should I be measuring to figure some of this out?

    Set-up is a custom Tsunami frame, mini v-brakes, and an Easton EC90X fork. Frame wasn't built specifically for me, so I don't have any design notes from builder on intended sizing of tires.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
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    One of these, or make one out of cardboard.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...ire-fit-gauge/
    Too old to ride plastic

  3. #3
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    The first step is to identify the conflict points on your specific bikes. Where is the tire closest to the frame/component? Is it the brake calipers? The chainstays? Fork Crown? Those are the three most common places. If you plan to run fenders, don't forget to account for that as well.

    Then there are other things to account for. On a road bike that only gets ridden in dry conditions on clean tarmac, you can get away with a fairly small gap, but on a gravel bike (or MTB) that get ridden in peanut butter mud or chunky loose gravel, you need to account for those things.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Nice! Thanks. So basically circles with the diameter of the common tire sizes I am considering. You get a bit of squash where the bottom of the circle meets the rim on an actual tire, but that will give me a really good idea of the ballpark I am playing in. That should be easy enough to make with some paper or cardboard. Use a rim without a tire to mock it up on the bike and go from there.

  5. #5
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    You can certainly do all of that, but for things like chain stays, you can just use any simple measuring device

    Of course for things like brake calipers or fenders, you really need a wheel and tire, or some facsimile.

  6. #6
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    I have 43 mm Panaracer GravelKings on my Van Dessel Gin & Trombones with TRP 8.4 v-brakes. The ride quality is awesome on any surface. Running them tubeless with Stan's latex.

    I could go even bigger, the frame would fit a few sizes bigger.

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