Handlebar suggestions - Wrist pain
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tribune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    57

    Handlebar suggestions - Wrist pain

    I am currently running an Easton EA50 bar on my cross check with a 90mm thomson stem, and I find that I get wrist pain in the drops when going over rough terrain (a lot of the terrain where I live is rocky/studdery hardpack).

    I believe I am experiencing the wrist pain from an improper angle when in the drops between my wrist and my forearm (for you athletic trainers I'm talking about the angle between 1st metacarpel/trapezium/scapoid/radius, placing pressure on the 2 wrist bones). Imagine when you are in the drops that your thumb is too far back towards your forearm. Ideally your wrist should be straight like on a mountain bike to take impacts. When it is cocked, every rock hurts!

    I imagine a longer stem would naturally reduce the wrist angle a bit, but I'm actually considering going to an even shorter stem for better control which will compound the problem.

    I illustrated the angles on the accompanying photo. The red line represents horizontal, the yellow line is the current drop angle, and the green line is the drop angle I'm looking for. I could of course rotate the bars I have, but this would make the hoods un-leveled.

    If anyone has experienced this issue and has any recommendations for a drop bar (31.8, wider the better) that has a shorter angle I'd appreciate it. Thanks.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    78
    Have you considered a classic style bar like a Ritchey Classic 31.8 bar. The drop is shallower and you can align the bottom to be parallel to the ground and keep you wrist more in line with your forearm. Also consider taping an extra piece of bar wrap on the top of the lower section of the bar and than wrap as normal and you will essentially have a "double" tape for your drops. This extra wrap makes a huge difference and if you only do the top it will not be to awkward to grasp.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,305
    have you been fitted on the bike?

    I just got released to normal activity after CTS surgery on Dec 8th. my hand therapist took a look at my positioning on my cross bike and found that I was too stretched out, there for putting too much weight on my hands.

    took the bike to my buddies shop and we had room to move my seat forward which put me in a more comfortable position. that paired with improving my posture will put me in a better position over all.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    Quote Originally Posted by tribune
    I could of course rotate the bars I have, but this would make the hoods un-leveled.
    Then move the hoods.

  5. #5
    Yo no fui.
    Reputation: Pablo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    8,081
    How much weight are you placing on your hands? Even over rough terrain, you weight should mainly be over the rear of the bike. Are you grabbing the bar too tightly?

    I say get fitted.
    "It is better to conquer yourself, than to win a thousand battles." -Dhammapada

    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

    "A true cyclist sometimes has to bite the dust before he can reach the stars.” Laurent Fignon

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    FWIW my first impression looking at your setup is that the bars should be rotated forward. This will move the drops closer to you, and the angle will be more comfortable.

    It's a common cross move to jank up the bars, to make the hoods closer for technical riding, but it screws up the position of the drops IMO.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    994
    I had similiar pain/discomfort when I was running similar looking bars. I also narrowed it down to the angle of my wrist to forearm.

    The pain went away after two changes:
    1. Switched to the FSA Compact/Shallow drop bar. They vary in price from $35 alloys to $200 carbon. All do the same thing.
    2. Loosened my grip so that not all the shock of the roughs were being transferred to me. Tight enough to maintain control, but loose enough so that the bar does a very slight ricochet dance in your hand.
    The bars alone will make a word of difference.

  8. #8
    ¿Por Que?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    383
    I agree with Pretender that if you keep those bars, you should rotate the bars forward a bit.

    I agree with others though that a different bar altogether might be a good way to go. A bar with a round bend, including "Classic" shape bars such as those by Ritchey, 3T and Deda, or one of the newer "Compact" shapes such as those by FSA, allow a greater variety of hand positions thereby making it easier for you to find a comfortable position. These bars also move your hands *closer* to your levers when in the drops rather than further away from them such as with shapes like yours.

    Call me old-fashioned, but I am far preferential to classic round shaped drops, both functionally and aesthetically.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    I like Salsa short n shallow even tho they are "ergo" shaped.

    Even more extreme, I think Shiggy still has some Midge bars to sell.

  10. #10
    Game on, b*tches!
    Reputation: Kram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,467
    +1 on the short n shallows. FWIW-I have a pr, lightly used, that I'll get go for cheap.
    Originally Posted by tetter
    'Pain is temporary, and there might be beer at the finish line'

    "Karma is spread in lots of different ways. You know, like herpes."
    catzilla
    "I'm an American male. This is pizza. Leave me alone!"
    Alton Brown
    ohnoIaintsuckingnomore.blogspot.com



  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by pretender
    .

    Even more extreme, I think Shiggy still has some Midge bars to sell.
    +1. That's the bar
    Truly a wealth of useless information.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    Quote Originally Posted by Buckaloni
    +1. That's the bar
    If you buy into it, though, you have to really get those bars up, and in some cases (like my 29er) they just don't make stems steep enough. Just to temper the enthusiasm.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    362
    I agree with the suggestion to try an non-"ergo" bar. Ergo bars like the ones on your bike lock you into one wrist angle in the drops. Try a "variable radius" bar like the Bontrager VR or FSA compact.

  14. #14

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    9
    Fitted is the way to go, as everyone is different.

    It could be a rotation of the bar - it might even be that your bars are either to small for your shoulders or too big. That can effect all the small angles in which you're putting pressure on your wrists.

    Being fit on your bike is about the best investment you can get, as it should naturally cross over to any other bikes you ride. Also, when making future bike purchases you can gauge which geometry is best fit for you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.