Looking at a cross bike
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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Looking at a cross bike

    So I am thinking about a cross bike. For no other reason than to have a little break from my road bike and my TT bike. Am I crazy for limiting myself to just one? I like the simplicity of the Kona Jake and I have not read anything bad on it.
    If This Is Heaven...How Bad Is Hell???

  2. #2
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    not if you have our heart set on it. I'm getting ready to pull the trigger on a 2nd cx bike. getting a bike fit test done eliminated a bunch of bikes for me. coming from the world of mtb's I wanted a disc cx bike. Turns out that won't happen for me for another couple years. there just aren't enough choices out there in frames that fit my short stalky frame.

  3. #3
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    Kona is always a safe bet for cross bikes so no, you're not crazy. I'd still look around at some other brands though.

  4. #4
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    If I had only one bike, it would a cross bike. I use mine as a road bike (with slicks), offroad (even mtb trails) and in the winter (studded tires). Many cross frames also come with eyelets for fenders and racks, so they could be used for light touring. Just really versatile that can be used for almost any type of riding.

    The Kona is a good bike if it fits. Now every mfr has a cross bike in their lineup, so look around. The biggest difference with road bikes may be the bottom bracket height and slacker head angle (72 vs 73). Some cross bikes have higher bb heights (like 6.5cm) vs traditional road (7 cm).

    My frame material preference is aluminum or titanium over carbon and steel - better crash resistance/durability (over carbon) and corrosion resistance (over steel if you don't clean your bike often).
    My Bikes
    "It's supposed to be hard...The hard is what makes it great."

  5. #5
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    To each their own.

    I'd say the downside to carbon bikes is the price, unless you plan on crashing every time you jump on it. I know I don't, so my carbon Trek Cronus has proven to be excellent so far, it hasn't even so much as creaked once on me yet, and I'm around 220 and slightly "hard" on the bike too. I went for carbon for the weight savings because if I take it to work, I have to shoulder it up a long flight of stairs on the way home and the fact that I don't really have to worry about saving every last penny (I'm a mechanic for my 'city', lol). The only thing I don't like about it is the color scheme, but then again when used properly and covered in mud, they all look the same.

    All I can offer is take your time and have fun picking your bike. Get out and see a bunch of bikes and see what you like best and suits your budget. For myself, and I bought my bike at the Toronto Bike Show and had A LOT of fun just checking out all the different models, builds, prices and then comparing them all, and finally making my decision.
    2002 Cannondale Jekyll 800
    2011 Trek Cronus CX Ultimate

  6. #6
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    I love my Jakes (2005 Major Jake and 2010 Jake The Snake). They just really seem to fit me well. I have a tarmac pro but lately find myself just as likely to head out for a ride on either Jake as the Tarmac. Although there is no question that when it comes down to bare knuckle road performance, the Tarmac takes the day, it only really becomes a factor at speeds over 25 mph for me. Below that my Jakes are just fine. I even take them on local single track with 25c road tires. Other than fast bumpy or technical descents, there seems to be nothing they can't do.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by XLNC View Post
    To each their own.

    I'd say the downside to carbon bikes is the price, unless you plan on crashing every time you jump on it. I know I don't, so my carbon Trek Cronus has proven to be excellent so far, it hasn't even so much as creaked once on me yet, and I'm around 220 and slightly "hard" on the bike too. I went for carbon for the weight savings because if I take it to work, I have to shoulder it up a long flight of stairs on the way home and the fact that I don't really have to worry about saving every last penny (I'm a mechanic for my 'city', lol). The only thing I don't like about it is the color scheme, but then again when used properly and covered in mud, they all look the same.
    I am hesitant to buy a carbon cross bike, though I know it should be strong and safe enough. XLNC, do you race it, or also ride it on dirt roads and gravel. I ask because I'm wondering how the carbon frame holds up to pebbles and things hitting it. Any experience with that yet? Did you protect the chain stays or down tube in any way?

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