Why Canti Instead of Mini-V?
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    coaster
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,051

    Why Canti Instead of Mini-V?

    In the Worlds coverage I'm seeing a lot of cantilevers, more actually that mini-Vs.

    In the mid nineties besides racing cross country I was into trials and got obsessive in playing with all the minute setup variations to give my cantis the best possible power and feel. They were DIALED! Then in '96 V-brakes came out and were so much better it affected racing. I remember one kid with a Shimano sponsorship got them early and all of a sudden he was one of the better descenders. Everyone swapped out their cantis as quickly as possible. When I went to Cairns for Worlds I brought 4 pairs for Aussies who were hosting us and couldn't get them till months later. They were FRANTIC to get them before the big race cuz word had gone around that it was a game changer. My point is, how were v-brakes such an improvement in MTB but not in cross? I've seen 80, 85, and 90mm arms so it seems like you could find just the right power and feel for your levers and preference. What's the argument for cantis?
    Last edited by Lelandjt; 01-31-2016 at 08:39 PM.

  2. #2
    Cranky Old Bastard
    Reputation: Randy99CL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2,337
    "When you know absolutely nothing, anyone who knows 1% more than nothing sounds like an expert."

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    Mini-Vs have too much leverage and not enough clearance, because obviously there is an upper limit to how short you can make the arms.

    Of the pros still using cantis, seems like a great majority use either the Tektro RevoX or Shimano CX70. These are both very good low-profile cantis that allow you to fine-tune the brake leverage to taste.

    Also, most of the pros now using cantis have fork-crown-mounted cable hangers, which all but eliminates front brake judder, which used to be a big problem.

  4. #4
    coaster
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,051
    Don't 6800 or 9000 levers combined with 80 or 85mm arms eliminate the "pads too close" problem? Reading the above linked thread it looked like Vs are the clear winner except for this issue and they were all posting from 2012, before the lomger pull levers came out.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,061
    Quote Originally Posted by pretender View Post
    Mini-Vs have too much leverage and not enough clearance, because obviously there is an upper limit to how short you can make the arms.

    Of the pros still using cantis, seems like a great majority use either the Tektro RevoX or Shimano CX70. These are both very good low-profile cantis that allow you to fine-tune the brake leverage to taste.

    Also, most of the pros now using cantis have fork-crown-mounted cable hangers, which all but eliminates front brake judder, which used to be a big problem.
    There is no "too much leverage" problem with mini-v's. They in fact provide better braking power AND better "feathering" brake control than cantis. The problem with mini-v's is mostly lack of range in adjusting the pads, largely because road levers don't pull enough cable. Thus, you are forced to set the pads closer to the rim, and then you have less clearance than when using cantis. Personally, I don't usually have a need for large clearance because my races are not usually super muddy. So, I like running a mini-v in the front and keep a canti in the back, as this gets me better braking power where it matters most (in the front).

    I went through the transition from cantis to v-brakes to discs in mountain biking. There is no question that v-brakes were a tremendous improvement over cantis. In particular I liked v-brakes along with ceramic rim surfaces, as that combination was very reliable in wet and muddy conditions. Then hydro discs came along and provide even better braking power and even better modulation (one finger only needed to control brakes!).

    Really strong braking power is only occasionally needed in CX racing. So, cantis works "good enough" and v-brakes were not really needed. Plus, there was always a problem where road levers lack of long cable pull made v-brakes difficult to set up just right. Now disc brakes are coming along and effectively "leapfrogging" over the advantages of v-brakes on CX bikes.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,270
    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    There is no "too much leverage" problem with mini-v's. They in fact provide better braking power AND better "feathering" brake control than cantis.
    I know people who have used mini-Vs and have specifically not liked their modulation, but it's a matter of taste as much as anything else I guess.

    For a season I ran mini-V front with a travel agent and I really liked the braking, but the travel agent would get gunked up pretty easily.

  7. #7
    coaster
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,051
    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    Really strong braking power is only occasionally needed in CX racing. So, cantis works "good enough" and v-brakes were not really needed. Plus, there was always a problem where road levers lack of long cable pull made v-brakes difficult to set up just right. Now disc brakes are coming along and effectively "leapfrogging" over the advantages of v-brakes on CX bikes.
    Good points. I guess mini-Vs didn't really hit their stride until the longer cable pull 6800 & 9000 levers came out and by then people were already starting to go disc. My dad will be taking delivery of a bike soon with 6800 levers and TRP 84mm mini-Vs. I'll be curious to try it. We were worried that the arms would be too short (looked for 90mm brakes) and have a wooden, under-leveraged feel but the above comments have me optimistic that it'll be perfect.

  8. #8
    Not Banned
    Reputation: atpjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    49,013
    mini vees stop great
    they clog with mud and grass like mofos
    stopping power is meaningless if your wheels don't rotate
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    331
    The price you pay with the added force is that the travel is reduced and you need to set the pads too close to the rims. Then you have to buy the travel agent to square that away. Some levers are better than others, but for most folks, braking too much is easy on both set ups so I prefer canti.

Similar Threads

  1. Canti brake pads on Mini-V's, Power issues?
    By ac/bc in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-16-2014, 08:55 AM
  2. Mini, mini report Cleveland TN
    By brianmcg in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-27-2011, 12:01 PM
  3. Avid canti's
    By toddre in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-29-2010, 06:13 PM
  4. Setting up Canti's
    By morkm in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-01-2007, 02:51 PM
  5. Mini Wedgie & EMT mini questions
    By Cerddwyr in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-18-2004, 01:14 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.