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  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akirasho View Post
    One of the things that still bother me in his case is the lack of a positive test (as defined by the standards of the day).

    I'm not a lawyer but outside of a world created by various cycling agencies, doping agencies and the country of France, a prosecutor might only have had a flimsy circumstantial case in a purely US court. Indeed, it sometimes seems as though "the evidence showed that the only way he could have won 7 tours was by doping".


    Also, I've been suspicious of the apparent size of such a conspiracy especially over such a long timespan.


    FREE MEEK MIL.. I MEAN LANCE ARMSTRONG!!!
    Lance tested positive for corticosteroids....but he had a "prescription" (backdated) so all was forgiven...

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    What about the sh8t that Sky is doing? Armstong may be a cheat, but IMO he doesn't need to apologize to the public seeing how doping is still rampant.
    Based on this logic, I don't really need to follow the traffic laws in our country. I see so many people violate laws (rules), so I should just do it too.

  3. #28
    wut?
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    It's better than Politics. Oh wait, someone mentioned Trump up the line in their insightful post.

    IMO Armstrong was unconditionally the most talented and greatest Tour de France Rider ever. Period.

    Some agree with me. Some disagree. Others are somewhere in between. Those that make it a life or death level debate need help.
    Well, we can certainly agree on that!

    There was a local businessman here that actually made a death threat against Travis Tygart. It looked like the guy was going to do some jail time but in the end I think he got off with probation.

    ...Needs serious help!!!
    There I was...

  4. #29
    The Slow One.
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    Lance's World Championship was likely tainted by doping, by his own admission. He was a potential Classics contender, but the vast majority of his career was so so skewed by doping that we'll never know how much he would have achieved as a professional. My guess? A mid-tier rider. A GT contender? Not without Dr Ferrari and a cast of enablers.

    I just want him to go away. Quietly. Fade from the public consciousness. I'd rather not be called "Lance" by the random redneck on the road, and have them revert to questioning my sexuality.

  5. #30
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    I'm not a LA fan, but he helped define the sport and the industry behind it: The good and the bad- in ways that even Merchx, Pantani, Coppi, Hinault Lemond, and others couldn't. He made Trek the powerhouse they are today, and he is the reason so many riders are riding today here in the US. I remember Lance as a Junior racer. He was really cocky, but the dude showed a lot of talent. I remember riding the bike trails here and seeing maybe 50 riders on a 20 mile Trek down to the beach and back; Now I see 50 riders in the first 5 miles off my ride. That's the Lance Factor. They knew he was doping. I would bet that even Trek knew to some degree and they turned a blind eye to it. The billions he brought into the cycling industry is unmatched by anyone before or after. I'm a Lemond fan. He was my idol when I started racing back in 1988. Greg was the first to race on a carbon bike: Lance was the first to make you want one. Bicycle technology is advancing the way it has because of him. Many will argue that but let's face it: The technological advancements in the last 15 years surpasses anything done in the previous 50 years. The Lance factor is largely responsible for that. Most Americans (and most others in the world) could've cared less before that.

  6. #31
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    Have to disagree strongly. Saw him get severely beat up in NE crits when with Eddie B. at Subaru Montgomery and later saw him suffer in Montreal.

    Guess you forget San Sebastian. Let's face it, there was a big difference pre and post cancer.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    I'm not a LA fan, but he helped define the sport and the industry behind it: The good and the bad- in ways that even Merchx, Pantani, Coppi, Hinault Lemond, and others couldn't. He made Trek the powerhouse they are today, and he is the reason so many riders are riding today here in the US. I remember Lance as a Junior racer. He was really cocky, but the dude showed a lot of talent. I remember riding the bike trails here and seeing maybe 50 riders on a 20 mile Trek down to the beach and back; Now I see 50 riders in the first 5 miles off my ride. That's the Lance Factor. They knew he was doping. I would bet that even Trek knew to some degree and they turned a blind eye to it. The billions he brought into the cycling industry is unmatched by anyone before or after. I'm a Lemond fan. He was my idol when I started racing back in 1988. Greg was the first to race on a carbon bike: Lance was the first to make you want one. Bicycle technology is advancing the way it has because of him. Many will argue that but let's face it: The technological advancements in the last 15 years surpasses anything done in the previous 50 years. The Lance factor is largely responsible for that. Most Americans (and most others in the world) could've cared less before that.
    I think you nailed it.
    My biking interest was entirely devoted to mountain biking prior to Lance (even though I trained for another sport on a (seemingly) cast iron Centurion prior to 85).

    I never expected Lance to be anything other than a douche bag--pretty much like every other roadie I met in the bike shops in the 80's and early 90's.

    Lance made watching the TDF a tradition on July mornings with the wife and I and we'd tilt the bed up, get some OJ, and watch the races religiously. My wife would keep the reruns on all day. We've been hooked every since but have no illusions that any professional sports are clean.

    We do find the eventual damage done by PEDs to be a sad trade off for short lived fame. But, when we see how effed up a large portion of society has become because of drugs and alcohol, the attempt to get an artificial high is a far more damaging and pathetic pursuit.

  8. #33
    The Slow One.
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    The PR world recognized Lance as a product.
    prod·uct /ˈprädəkt/ noun
    1. an article or substance that is manufactured or refined for sale.

    The American public bought it, and it flung the doors wide open on a vast marketplace that had never been fully tapped for the UCI. The TV coverage certainly got better. It certainly wasn't the first "10 speed" revolution we'd seen, but it was probably the first we could attribute to one person. LeMond didn't have that kind of presence, and a bunch of guys with funny names just didn't inspire like the fabricated persona that was Lance.

    Did it positively affect the popularity of the sport in traditional cycling nations? Not really. They recognized Lance for what he was and is.

    And now we're contracting to pretty much where we were before Lance. Eric Min gets more people on bikes day after day than Lance does. The world has moved on, and I'd rather Lance and his generation just fade off into a distant, unpleasant memory.

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