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  1. #151
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    In the "here we go again" department, I'm thinking of looking for a different seat for my VR5. I actually changed out the seat before I even took delivery of the bike, so I do have the OEM seat in a box along with a couple of other seats from years past. Any comments on the OEM seat? I might just try a couple of the seats that I have since I no longer remember where they came from or why they're laying around in my workshop. But I think that my physique and riding style have changed a lot over the years and something else might work better for me now.

    On a negative note, the dealer where I bought my bike is going out of business. Really unfortunate since they were the only Felt dealer around and were one of the very few shops in this area that promoted road bikes (this is mostly a MTB/Trail/Hybrid area). They specialized in triathlon bikes and gear, so maybe that ended up not working out so well.

  2. #152
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    Anyone have a problem with chain-drop in the front jamming between the crank assembly and the frame?
    My wife's VR5W did this and the bottom bracket had to be loosened to free the chain. It was impossible to remove the chain by hand, stranded on the ride.
    I emailed Felt and was told to adjust the fr derr and, from the pics I sent the customer service guy, he said it looked OK to him.
    The frame was gouged from the pretzel-twisted chain that had jammed.. jammed so tight it was impossible to remove without loosening the BB.
    This happened about 8 mos ago and I had the derr adjusted then the bike didn't get ridden. Now with the dtr's wedding over my wife's taken her bike out and the second ride out the exact thing happened again, we were stranded and had to be sagged in.
    Here's Felt's email reply from last Sept...
    'Frame scratch From the photo the frame does not look permanently damaged. My suggestion is when you take it to the shop to make sure the front derr. is adjusted correctly, have them take a look in person to access it. From the photos it looks OK to me.
    I hope this helps.
    Thanks,
    Alan Foster - Felt Bicycles
    Consumer Relations'
    He said 'the frame DOES NOT LOOK PERMANENTLY DAMAGED.' Trust me, the frame is permanently marred. I have owned 6 other brands of bikes: Trek, Look, Merlin, Serrotta, Orbea and GT. None have ever exhibited a problem like this when a front chain was dropped. I did have a problem with my Look frame and they upgraded me to their better frame for cost and gave me all kinds of Look swag. When Alan stated he 'didn't feel the frame was damaged' and then that's-that, I don't feel Felt addressed this situation adequately. This is just a side-note on the customer service you can expect from Felt.
    I took the bike back in and had a chain catcher installed on the derr. Just a word of warning about the chain-drop and my experience with Felt's CS...

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    In the "here we go again" department, I'm thinking of looking for a different seat for my VR5. I actually changed out the seat before I even took delivery of the bike, so I do have the OEM seat in a box along with a couple of other seats from years past. Any comments on the OEM seat? ...
    With my OEM saddle I was also not satisfied. Tried it on the Felt and even on my MTB. Was ok, but not good and is now in a box with all the other saddles.
    Good look finding the right seat,

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerman View Post
    Anyone have a problem with chain-drop in the front jamming between the crank assembly and the frame?...
    I had that Problem.
    Also had to remove the drive side of the crank to get the chain out.
    I don't know the root cause exactly, but I think it was a mixture of
    - wrong shifting
    - chainrings (FSA)
    - front derailleur adjustment.
    Since I adjusted the front derailure and changed the shifting I didn't had the problem anymore. Also change the chainrings and chain when worn out.

    Additionally I used MarshGuard slapper tape to protect the frame. It also narrows the gap, that the chain will not fit anymore between the chainring and the frame, like a chainguard.

  5. #155
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    The problem is not the chain dropping, it's that the chain jams fully when dropped that the only way to free it is pull the crank. You are stranded.

    No tape, but I noted in my original post I had a chain catcher installed after this second.. we will see.

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerman View Post
    The problem is not the chain dropping, it's that the chain jams fully when dropped that the only way to free it is pull the crank. You are stranded.

    No tape, but I noted in my original post I had a chain catcher installed after this second.. we will see.
    Sorry to hear about this, and now I'm getting paranoid about it so might look into the chain catcher and/or tape. One thing I'm glad of is that I swapped out my crank assembly last year (for a FSA 46/30) and the work was done by a TdF-level mechanic at the shop where I bought it. No shifting problems whatsoever since then (although, given where I ride, the bike stays on the big ring almost all the time).

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerman View Post
    The problem is not the chain dropping, it's that the chain jams fully when dropped that the only way to free it is pull the crank. You are stranded.

    No tape, but I noted in my original post I had a chain catcher installed after this second.. we will see.
    Ok, I got it. You are not looking for a solution, you just wanna blame someone.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    Sorry to hear about this, and now I'm getting paranoid about it so might look into the chain catcher and/or tape. ....
    Don't be paranoid.
    If you don't have shifting problem, the chain will not drop. And if the chain is not dropping, it will not jam.
    If your chain drops, it is just important immediately to stop pedaling. It only jams if you keep on pedaling. And if it jams to have the right tool with you to remove the crank.
    When I jammed my chain, it was in a group ride and it was my fault, that I continued pedaling. But with my multi tool I could losen the crank and free the chain in minutes.
    To prevent that happen again and protect my frame, I closed the gap between frame and inner chainring, so the chain can not jam anymore.

    But like I said before, the root cause was a bad adjusted front derailleur. And since I fixed that, the chain never dropped again.


  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobsn View Post
    Ok, I got it. You are not looking for a solution, you just wanna blame someone.
    What part of my response was assigning blame? Honestly, I did it as a warning. If the chain-catcher that was installed fails then the more severe measure of replacing components will be done, then replacing the bike. This is unacceptable.

    But since you mentioned blame, I believe Felt's design department deserves quite a bit. Chain drop is not 100% preventable. I just saw occurrences at the TdF, and it's happened on my other five brands of bikes I've owned. I go to the best mechanics within a reasonable driving distance, within an hour. These are well respected people in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex... Fort Worth Cycling and Jason, Hilltop Bicycle with Jeff, to name a couple.

    In addition, I do not feel Felt's CS met the level I have experienced with other brands of bikes I've owned. That is an important factor to me when making a significant purchase like this. Unfortunately, I have to say I'm underwhelmed and, in hind-sight, I would have bought another brand.

    Bottom line, loosening the bottom bracket with a multi-tool when you are on a group ride 15 miles out of town, making them stop and wait, is not a reasonable option. I've ridden a lot in the last 15 years and never once experienced anyone doing anything to the bottom bracket other than tighten it.. once.. maybe.

    This is a design flaw that others need to be warned about so precautions, like adding a chain-catcher, may be taken. Blaming does no good Tobsn, I'm just offering a friendly warning.

  10. #160
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    FWIW, I put a K-Edge chain keeper on all my bikes, just in case. Even with meticulous DI2 dial-in and precise chain line adjustment I have had very occasional chain drop up front. I know what you mean by chain getting stuck--the first time it happened on my AR2 I tore off the metal stay protector just to get the chain unstuck miles from home.

    The K-Edge works very well, and I will caution you to check the adjustment of them occasionally, as they will drift with vibration/use. But, I only had one chain drop in all the years of using one--hence my advise to ensure its properly adjusted now and then.

    https://k-edge.com/product-category/chain-catchers/
    2017 Felt IA16 - DI2 Ultegra
    2016 Felt FRD F1X - DI2 XTR
    2015 Felt Rail 29 Cruiser

  11. #161
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    Looking at the latest VR models, I noticed one subtle change. When I got my first-year VR5, most of the VR series (Shimano-based models) had 46/30 chainrings (the VR5 had 48/32, which I later changed out for the 46/30 setup). Now I see that they all are coming with 48/32s. Not much difference, but maybe the 46/30 combo was just a bit too low for some people.

  12. #162
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    Anyone know what the practical max width tire is that will fit the VR5? I've got 700x32s now but am thinking about a second set of "gravel grinding" wheels with more aggressive tires. What might fit?

    Sent from my BTV-W09 using Tapatalk

  13. #163
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    roch.. how much room do you show left with your 32's mounted? I just put Gatorskin Hardshell 32's on my VR4 and still looks like room. I thought I had read online about wider tires used so looked and I just found this on Bike Forums... 'A recent reviewer says he installed 35mm Schwalbe-G-Ones.'

  14. #164
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    Happy to announce the chain-catcher installed on wife's VRW5 has worked flawlessly, she's had no further problems.
    I have been so encouraged by this I am committing to my VR4, so switching out the single front to SRAM eTap and making it a double. Going with a compact 50/34 in the front and 11x32 in the rear as pretty flat around here.

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerman View Post
    Happy to announce the chain-catcher installed on wife's VRW5 has worked flawlessly, she's had no further problems. ...
    Good to hear that you found a solution.

    50/34 seems also the way Felt is going with the VR 2019.
    46/30 2017 --> 48/32 2018 --> 50/34 2019
    Maybe more people complaint about shifting problems with the FSA and chain suck with the smaller chainrings.
    For a small gearing they mount now 11-34 cassettes.
    I personally would like a 12-32 cassette with 50/34.

    For winter I already mounted some 35mm tires on the VR.
    Again Mavic and tubeless, was very pleased with them this summer.

    IMG_20181005_112054.jpg

    IMG_0948.jpg

  16. #166
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    I just picked up a used 2018 Felt VR40. So far I'm enjoying it and having fun with my bar tape to play off the "acid green".

    I've read a lot of different answers on tire clearance and was curious what people have fit ?

    Felt officially states 30mm, I know 32mm is fine based on this forum. How about 35's?

    Thanks

  17. #167
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    35s will most likely fit, but it probably depends on the specific tire. I've seen the same size in different brands that vary in their external dimensions. Also, if it's got an off-road tread with a sort of "knobby" pattern then it might be a close fit.

  18. #168
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    Older thread but one of the reasons why I bought a 2018 Felt VR3. I got mine new as a holdover 4 weeks ago for $1900 (originally $3700). I have put maybe 200 mile so far riding in NY since we have been having nice weather (40+ degrees) most weekends.

    I will say I was a tad skeptical about the the 48/32 crank but it has made climbing a lot easier especially being out of shape since I haven't ridden since November, but it's simply not as snappy or fast as a 50/34 or larger.

    I think the VR3 is an amazing endurance bike but I am not quite sold on it being a "variable road" bike. Yes the 28mm tires are pretty plush for road standards but are pretty meager for any kind of real gravel or anything beyond packed dirt trails. I recently was riding on a paved trail and some pedestrians had their headphones on so I decided to circumvent them and pass them on the grass. When I reentered the path I hit a small wooden lip which I easily have conquered with my gravel bike but these tires had me sliding onto my left side. My body and the left Shimano 105 SPD-SL pedal took the brunt of the hit and I scraped my left knee, tore a left glove, and scratched the side of the carbon 105 pedal. The bike itself to my surprise had minor injuries with the rear through axle being scratched but nothing on the carbon, the end of the bar tape on the left side had minor abrasions, and oddly enough on the steerer tube maybe a small rock created a 3mm paint chip that didn't break off right away until I started examining it and rubbing it. Under the paint the carbon was unscathed and I would have just probably sealed that area back up with top coat but the difference between the neon green paint and black raw carbon was pretty noticeable so I decided to just adhere the paint chip back on with automotive top coat.

    Luckily I had installed a K-Edge chain catcher so the chain didn't fall and damage the frame

    All in all besides this minor spill the bike has been awesome but the spill has taught me that with the stock 28mm tires are great for road rides but throw anything not quite flat at it and you really want to use the max 35mm tire clearance or simply just use a gravel bike. Granted it could just be my dumb luck why I slipped.



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    Last edited by jrasero; 3 Weeks Ago at 06:44 AM.

  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobsn View Post
    Oh boy, do I love those marketing terms.
    What is Gravel? What is Endurance? ...
    By the bike you like most and suites your need.
    And if you tell us your needs, we can tell you if the VR can fit those.

    Comparing the Breezer Inversion and the Felt VR, both are made for a stabile and comfortable ride.
    Not really, for me gravel tires start at 40mm, sure the VR officially can handle 28mm-30mm tires and people have easily managed to get 32mm-35mm in there but there are so many grades of "gravel" from packed dirt to non mainatined tracks or roads with deep sharp layers of gravel that normally a hardtail would tackle. Sure 28mm tires are supple for roadies and sure you could ride any bike on "gravel" but for me it comes down to stability especially on loose segment.

    Now if you are following Felt's marketing and are going from paved to packed dirt roads sure a VR can handle that but any bike with 28mm+ tires can do that. I guess the kicker is the 48/32 crank which was first intended for gravel/adventure bikes in on the VR but IMO inherently doesn't make it a gravel bike but a bike that makes climbing or going further more possible.

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrasero View Post
    Not really, for me gravel tires start at 40mm, sure the VR officially can handle 28mm-30mm tires and people have easily managed to get 32mm-35mm in there but there are so many grades of "gravel" from packed dirt to non mainatined tracks or roads with deep sharp layers of gravel that normally a hardtail would tackle. Sure 28mm tires are supple for roadies and sure you could ride any bike on "gravel" but for me it comes down to stability especially on loose segment.

    Now if you are following Felt's marketing and are going from paved to packed dirt roads sure a VR can handle that but any bike with 28mm+ tires can do that. I guess the kicker is the 48/32 crank which was first intended for gravel/adventure bikes in on the VR but IMO inherently doesn't make it a gravel bike but a bike that makes climbing or going further more possible.
    I agree with you on this, as I've often been confused about what, exactly, a "gravel bike" is intended for and lots of the gravel roads that I see in the ads would be hard to find around here (Michigan, USA). In fact, when I bought my VR5 right after it came out, I don't think that there was any such marketing term, but rather if it wasn't a road bike it was a "cyclocross" bike. So the VR5 was marketed in a new "adventure bike" category. And so it goes...

    I have Conti GP 4-Season 32s on mine and they are great for all the types of paved and unpaved riding that I do. We have 100s of miles of unpaved roads close by, but depending on the time of year and how recently they've been graded they can be very gnarly! There's a big casual group in the area that call themselves the "Gravel Grinders" who go on a 30-50 mile ride every Tuesday, and they all ride MTBs. I've ridden with them on my Crosstrail hybrid, but would never tackle many of those roads on the VR, although it does quite well if I pick one of the less rutted and washboarded routes.

    The VR5 has also proven to be a great road bike for me and I've appreciated the 46/30 crank on some of the hills I've had to tackle. Besides, I'm old and slow enough now that the only way I'll spin out on the big ring is on a steep downhill.

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    I agree with you on this, as I've often been confused about what, exactly, a "gravel bike" is intended for and lots of the gravel roads that I see in the ads would be hard to find around here (Michigan, USA). In fact, when I bought my VR5 right after it came out, I don't think that there was any such marketing term, but rather if it wasn't a road bike it was a "cyclocross" bike. So the VR5 was marketed in a new "adventure bike" category. And so it goes...

    I have Conti GP 4-Season 32s on mine and they are great for all the types of paved and unpaved riding that I do. We have 100s of miles of unpaved roads close by, but depending on the time of year and how recently they've been graded they can be very gnarly! There's a big casual group in the area that call themselves the "Gravel Grinders" who go on a 30-50 mile ride every Tuesday, and they all ride MTBs. I've ridden with them on my Crosstrail hybrid, but would never tackle many of those roads on the VR, although it does quite well if I pick one of the less rutted and washboarded routes.

    The VR5 has also proven to be a great road bike for me and I've appreciated the 46/30 crank on some of the hills I've had to tackle. Besides, I'm old and slow enough now that the only way I'll spin out on the big ring is on a steep downhill.
    Hey Roch you and Tobsn are like the VR gurus of this forum lol. Gravel is one of the trendier bike segments and its crazy how fast it has kind of influenced road bikes with any modern bike accepting 28mm+ tires now.

    You are right that "gravel" bikes weren't as defined back in 2016 when the VR was launching, so it will be interesting to see how the VR evolves. We have seen with Felt having dedicated adventure and gravel bikes now the current VR has moved to a more traditional 50/34 crank and the VR3 now includes carbon wheels. So my prediction is that the VR becomes more of a traditional endurance bike now

    Coming from a 2017 Scott Addict 20 Disc and a 2018 Litespeed T6, I think the VR is a great blend of comfort and performance. My Scott Addict 20 Disc was race geometry before Scott made the Addict line endurance focused and while I loved how fast that bike was it had a ton of carbon chatter even with 28mm tires standard. The Litespeed T6 was kind of a compromise since it fixed the chatter with the Ti but downgraded to 25mm tires so a tad less stable, no disc brakes, and went to 105 from Ultegra. The T6 was an endurance geometry so a bit of a departure from the Addict but I simply missed disc brakes and just never found it to be that lively. The VR is not only comfortable with the relaxed geometry, long seat post, has minimal carbon chatter, and intelligently designed TT and seat stays but it also excels in climbing and while not as lively as the Addict still has some sprinting ability.

    Thanks for turning me onto the VR series and happy riding!

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerman View Post
    Anyone have a problem with chain-drop in the front jamming between the crank assembly and the frame?
    My wife's VR5W did this and the bottom bracket had to be loosened to free the chain. It was impossible to remove the chain by hand, stranded on the ride.
    I emailed Felt and was told to adjust the fr derr and, from the pics I sent the customer service guy, he said it looked OK to him.
    The frame was gouged from the pretzel-twisted chain that had jammed.. jammed so tight it was impossible to remove without loosening the BB.
    This happened about 8 mos ago and I had the derr adjusted then the bike didn't get ridden. Now with the dtr's wedding over my wife's taken her bike out and the second ride out the exact thing happened again, we were stranded and had to be sagged in.
    Here's Felt's email reply from last Sept...
    'Frame scratch From the photo the frame does not look permanently damaged. My suggestion is when you take it to the shop to make sure the front derr. is adjusted correctly, have them take a look in person to access it. From the photos it looks OK to me.
    I hope this helps.
    Thanks,
    Alan Foster - Felt Bicycles
    Consumer Relations'
    He said 'the frame DOES NOT LOOK PERMANENTLY DAMAGED.' Trust me, the frame is permanently marred. I have owned 6 other brands of bikes: Trek, Look, Merlin, Serrotta, Orbea and GT. None have ever exhibited a problem like this when a front chain was dropped. I did have a problem with my Look frame and they upgraded me to their better frame for cost and gave me all kinds of Look swag. When Alan stated he 'didn't feel the frame was damaged' and then that's-that, I don't feel Felt addressed this situation adequately. This is just a side-note on the customer service you can expect from Felt.
    I took the bike back in and had a chain catcher installed on the derr. Just a word of warning about the chain-drop and my experience with Felt's CS...
    Some have suggested that the subcompact cranks might have effected this? For 2019 and newer Felt went back to the more standard 50/34 Shimano however my opinion is because this is just due to them now having dedicated Adventure and Gravel bikes in their lineup.

    I did install a chain catcher on my 2018 VR3 and went with a K-Edge Pro. First I highly recommend a chain catcher not only because it can prevent nasty cosmetic damage but also more serious carbon damage. At $30 the K-Edge Pro isn't cheap and it's main difference is that the arm can be adjusted while being mounted so you don't have to adjust the FD. $30 is nothing when you are talking about replacing a carbon frame BUT my K-Edge Pro's adjustment screw was super soft and stripped. Luckily I was able to screw it down in the right position before this happened at the recommended torque specs.

    So does it work? I believe so since I had a minor spill and normally this would have the chain popping off but the chain remained on. My chain dropped a couple times on my previous bike 2017 Scott Addict 20 Disc and was devastated, ever since then I put 3M mastic 2229 tape around the crank and the chain stays as well

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  23. #173
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    Took my VR to the Bronx River Trail and S County Trailway and got up to Pleasantville. Trail is well maintained for the most part and has some great hills and even a bridge or two.

    Bike climbed just as well if not better than the 2017 Scott Addict 20 Disc but without having to use as much energy. Top speed was almost identical but overall I was .3 mph slower than previous rides on this trail via Strava. This easily could have been me just getting back into form but overall bike didn't feel slow by any means even with the more upright position.

    All parts of the trail are paved but some are more well maintained than others with some parts with a good deal of pavement heave or debris. The frame soaked up a good deal of carbon chatter and while the 28mm tires where great on smooth pavement other parts could have benefited from larger tires or maybe running a slightly lower PSI. Overall as is stock the bikes is a great endurance bike but without a doubt needs larger tires if you want to tackle bumpy roads, broken pavement, loose gravel.


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