Hubs ... hubs and more hubs
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  1. #1
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    Hubs ... hubs and more hubs

    I want a fixed/free hub (for a 120mm track frame) with 36 holes. My current list of possibles seems to have me down to either an IRO (for $45 + lockrings) or a PhilWood for $172 including lockrings.

    Now, the IRO says "Does not include lock ring for fixed gear cogs (but if you leave the lockrings off, you can install singlespeed freewheels on one or both sides.)"

    Does this mean that most track hubs will take a freewheel if you don't have a lockring?

    -Chris

  2. #2
    duh...
    Reputation: FatTireFred's Avatar
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    sure you can do it... whether to want to or not is open to debate

  3. #3
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    My understanding is that both freewheels and track cogs have the same threading, so you can put a freewheel onto a track hub or a track cog on a freewheel hub (without a lockring). The difference is that on track hubs (or on the track side of a flipflop hub), there is a section of reverse (left-hand) threads out at the edge of the hub for the lockring. So with a flipflop, you can go free/fixed, free/free or suicide/fixed. What I don't understand is why all flipflops aren't threaded as fixed/fixed, since you can always run a freewheel on one side, and you could put fixed cogs of two different sizes on your wheel. I'm sure I'm missing some obvious reason why it's done the way it is.

  4. #4
    MB1
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    Not all that good an idea to run a freewheel on a fixed only hub.

    Quote Originally Posted by BianchiJoe
    What I don't understand is why all flipflops aren't threaded as fixed/fixed, since you can always run a freewheel on one side, and you could put fixed cogs of two different sizes on your wheel. I'm sure I'm missing some obvious reason why it's done the way it is.
    On a traditional fixed gear hub (think European and Japanese racing brands) there aren't enough threads to engage the entire base of a SS freewheel. There is the possiblity of stripping the threads of a track hub threaded for track use only. There is also some likelyhood that the freewheel will jam up against the spokes.

    American hub makers and designers tend to take the desire of some folks to run freewheels into account and include enough threading on their fixed hubs to allow the use of a freewheel on their fixed hubs which is why they mention it in their specifications.

    Unless the manufacturer specifically notes that their fixed hubs will accept freewheels you could run into problems which will not be covered under warranty.

    YMMV

    MB1
    Been there,
    done that.
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  5. #5
    djg
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    If it's gotta be 36 holes, then you might be right about the hub selection. If you can accept a 32 (which, with the right spokes, and lacing, and a good builder, can produce a very strong wheel), certainly there are other options out there for fixed/free combos in a 120 (Surly, Kogswell, Suzue come to mind, and Bontrager sells a decent flip/flop wheelset for the price of the phil rear hub, not that the hub isn't excellent--the bonty is a lower spoke count wheel but it's not fragile).

    If it's worth anything, MB1 sounds right to me on the thread/lockring issue.

  6. #6
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    Im very very keen on having 36 spokes. I ride 32 on all my other bikes, but this fixed gear bike is hopefully going to be able to take a lot of curb hopping and rough round two riding (although maybe my weyless (supergo) carbon fork isnt the smartest idea ... ).

    So the IRO or Phil Wood are probably my options. Now, I can afford either, but then I will have to skimp on other parts later, and also would not be super comfortable locking up a nearly $300 wheel in some places.

    Thanks,

  7. #7
    n00bsauce
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    The Surly is a good choice and can be had for $56 plus shipping from Universal Cycles. They have it in a 36 spoke count silver model in 120 track spacing, cartridge bearings and can run fixed or free on either side.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

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