2000 Cannondale R600 at Pawn Shop
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  1. #1
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    2000 Cannondale R600 at Pawn Shop

    I been wanting a road bike for awhile but cant afford one. Ran across a 2000 (I think) Cannondale R600 black with Bontrager Race Lite wheelset. Not sure if those are stock or not. It looks in OK shape but a project bike. Needs tires and tubes to be usable. Been dropped the right 105 shifter/brake is scratched up pretty bad but functions fine. Its right at $200 out the door. Thoughts? Its also not the right size as I was suggested a 54 from the bike shop. Its a 56 but it does not seem big at all but I could not actually ride it. Its also has the old style stem. Can new ones be found if I want to adjust fit a little?

  2. #2
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    I am 5'10" so I am thinking I was on the large side for a 54 anyway. Also it does look like it would clean up well.

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    I had a 1999 R800. The Bontrager wheels are not stock; original would have been Mavic. You can find replacement stems. With 105, if it functions good, $200 probably is a good deal. I sold my R800 this past year for $380.

  4. #4
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    I'm also 5 10. My R800 was a 56, but I used a shorter stem than the original. So, you may can make the 54 work.....different body types may require different sizing? You need to give it a test ride if any way possible.

  5. #5
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    Dude you better go get that bike before I do. Unless you are 5'4" then maybe just maybe it's to big for you. Don't get it if you are 6'2" though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnerrabbit View Post
    I am 5'10" so I am thinking I was on the large side for a 54 anyway. Also it does look like it would clean up well.
    I'm 5'10" on a 53, intentionally "running small" just fine. Considering Cannondale also runs a bit long, it could work for you.

    You can get a stem adapter. Considering the whole thing works, $200 ain't bad, but I wouldn't turn it into an investment.

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    On second thought 6'2" might work

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent319 View Post
    On second thought 6'2" might work
    Sizing is not so much of a "linear" function.
    In the pro peleton:
    Lance @ 5'9" rode a 58
    Contador @ 5'9" rode a 56 (Trek), then 52 and now 54 (Specialized)
    Cav @ 5'9" rides a 49 (he did this by choice; I think he has proportionally small legs though)
    The Schlecks at 6'2" didn't go lower than 56

    Considering both Lance and the Schlecks were on Treks in the same era, it is a little weird how the taller ones went with a drastically smaller size, and the shorter guy went with arguably too big a size.

  9. #9
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    I know fit is very important but this is probably the only way for me to get ridding at all. I should be in good shape to get something new next summer. My though was to replace tubes, tires, and stem

  10. #10
    pmf
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    You can fit fine on a 56 cm frame. I'm 5'9" and ride 56 cm bikes. You can play around with the seat position and possibly swap the stem if need be. Stems are cheap and easy to swap. For $200, you've got nothing to lose.

  11. #11
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    Agree with most above, that is a good deal and for another 100 bucks or so you can be up and riding a nice setup. After a few years riding it you can probably sell it for the same price you paid.

  12. #12
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    $200 doesn't sound bad, and the shop might take less if you offer cash up front (like $150-175). If 'old style stem' means a quill stem, yes they can be had easily for not much ($25-$80+ depending on material and weight) in varying lengths. You can get replacement hoods for your shifters as well for not a lot also (@ $15). Keep an eye on Ebay to get a replacement shifter, and check in with your LBS, they might hook you up with a take-off for cheap.
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    I think I got my quill adapter for $30 in a local LBS and they had them at Nashbar for a lot less than that.

  14. #14
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    I though it was a 2000 but now I am pretty sure its a 1999. Going back by there tomorrow and will likely pick it up. What are some things I need to look for? What am I likely going to need that I might not be thinking of bringing a bike back to life? I did look the frame over pretty good and it does not seem damaged. Had spider webs in the tight areas guessing it has been sitting for awhile.

  15. #15
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    Like I said $200 is fair, but the worse the condition, the less you should offer. If you're gonna need tires and tubes, ask them to knock off $25 (since you'll spend @ $35 to replace them on the cheap). Figure on replacing the chain as well, unless it looks spotless and no rust, links move easy, etc. Spin the wheels. Sounds silly but if they won't spin freely or have a wobble then you're gonna need to have them checked out by a shop. They may diagnose them for free, and you can decide whether to have them trued and the hubs overhauled or just replaced (sometimes it's cheaper to buy a new set). You might want/need a new saddle as well, but that'll depend on your arse more than anything. Bar tape and pedals are also likely to want/need replacing as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by chudak View Post
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  16. #16
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    Sounds like a good deal. Remember to post pics.

  17. #17
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    Got it home for $192
    Suggestions on tires, tube, and pump?
    Buying online.

    I think, I will need a shorter stem,
    but want to ride it as is first.

    My goal for this bike is to get comfortable and
    try to eventually make some local 20 mile group rides.

    Are these older flat spoke rims a good thing?

    I am 39 190lbs and out of shape.
    Need to fix that.

    I love bikes but have never had a road bike.

    Will post pics when I can get some decent ones.

  18. #18
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    Tires-what kind of tires are on it now? I might think some 28mm tires might be good to start with, I like Continentals. These will be wide enough to give you confidence, and narrow enough to get you going.
    Tubes-Lots of tubes will give good performance, if encased in good tires. Are your rims drilled for Presta(narrow, long valve) or Schrader(like a car has). Most name brand tubes are pretty good.
    Pump- Again, lots of good choices. Folks prefer Co2 alot nowadays where I'm at, but I still like to use an old Blackburn frame pump, myself. You might also want a track pump to fill things up at home, and just use the pump on the bike for emergencies. This also has you looking at your bike before every ride, which keeps you current with any issues regarding maintenance that may crop up.
    Sounds like a great bike you have there.
    Not so fast!

  19. #19
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    Its to big but I think it will work for intro to on road 101.
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  20. #20
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    Lower the saddle height and get yourself this in order to get a smaller stem. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000FG...092974-8970256

  21. #21
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    This seem ok?
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  22. #22
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    You just threw away $200 that could have been put toward a bike you can ride. Don't throw good money over bad. Eat your loss. Save up for a bike that can be made to fit without heroics. Polishing a turd results a highly polished turd. If it's too big it's too big. You can't make it smaller.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  23. #23
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    I do understand what your saying, but sometimes something is better than nothing.

  24. #24
    .je
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    I hate to weigh in on this, but I think that someone 5'10" is often advised to a 56cm model, not a 54. I'm 2" shorter, and always advised to the 54. In fact, try this link to Diamondback bikes, which size just almost exactly the same as Cannondale, who have a really quick size estimator: Diamondback Bicycles - 2013 Podium 3
    If you want to get into the pedantic pissing contest we see here, Competitive Cyclist has a fit calculator you can plug yourself into, and it will probably give you the same recommendations as the above link.

    Let's get our heads back in the real world: It's just a friggin bicycle. If it feels as good as you say, you probably have the right size, sit on it, push on the pedals, and turn left and right when you need to.

  25. #25
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    If you're 5' 10" then ride the crap out of that bad boy. That was a good deal at $192.00

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