ankle pain
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Thread: ankle pain

  1. #1
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    Question ankle pain

    Please Help

    I am getting left (only) ankle discomfort. Last year, I thought I have a ok set up cos I have no problem with a whole summer of long ride. (I usually do a 70 mile ride on Sundays, avarage speed is about 15mph, slow!)

    Last couple months have been trainer intervals. I added length to my intervals. Now I am at (6 sets of 3min at 20mph w/ 2 min rest, cadence at 100).

    I must "wider" them most people, so I set the left cleat to far right on the shoe to keep my knees happy.

    With this set up, I think I don't have enough support on the outside of left foot and my left ankle is complaining.

    How do I move my pedals farther out? Can I add spacers to the pedals?

  2. #2
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    uhh

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisca
    Please Help

    I must "wider" them most people,
    ???...

  3. #3
    wim
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    Don't use spacers, shims, washers, whatever.

    While it's possible that your feet are wider apart than most people's, it shouldn't cause you ankle pain. You're making some good guesses by moving your cleat as far inward as possible, but guesses is all they are. I strongly suggest you go to a good bike shop with your bike and let someone look at you. They may see your problem immediately and suggest a solution.

    What's more urgent is my advice to NOT move the pedal or pedals out by using spacers or washers. There's just barely enough thread to keep them in the cranks securely. Shimming them out could make them break out of the crank. That could be very ugly if that happens while you're standing up and cranking hard.
    Last edited by wim; 05-20-2005 at 12:06 PM.

  4. #4
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    Question Why pedals are one-size-fits-all?

    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    While it's possible that your feet are wider apart than most people's, it shouldn't cause you ankle pain. You're making some good guesses by moving your cleat as far inward as possible, but guesses is all they are. I strongly suggest you go to a good bike shop with your bike and let someone look at you. They may see your problem immediately and suggest a solution.

    What's more urgent is my advice to NOT move the pedal or pedals out by using spacers or washers. There's just barely enough thread to keep them in the cranks securely. Shimming them out could make them break out of the crank. That could be very ugly if that happens while you're standing up and cranking hard.

    Thanks for the patient (I know the post is comfusing), Yes. can't move the left cleat any farther to the right. I guess I have to take it to a shop.

    But I don't believe only me are having this problem with look pedals. Almost all cycling produces provides difference size to difference people.

    Why pedals are one size fits all?

  5. #5
    wim
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    Pedals are "one size fits all" because differences in foot size are supposed to be taken care of by different size shoes. There are ways to take care of your wide stance, but they don't involve modifying pedals or the way the pedals are attached to the cranks. One way it's done is by moving the cranks away from the frame. This means a longer bottom bracket axle and an adjustment in the chainline - for most people, that would mean trip to the bike shop.

    You might want to experiment by slowly and carefully riding uncleated in sneakers for a few days. The best way would be to temporarily install a pair of large BMX pedals, but it can be done by just wearing sneakers and stepping on your Look pedals. That would allow your feet to rotate completely free. If your ankle pains and knee pains disappear while you do that, your wide stance might not be the cause of your pain. It might have more to do with your current pedals not being able to accomodate the alignment and structure of your leg- and foot bones.

  6. #6
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    Talking wim - you are da man.

    That explains why only left ankle is giving me problem!!!! Because my LBS inserts spacers between large ring and small ring (less chain rub he said). So I don't have any problems on my right ankle.

    I will try to use tennis shoes for now until I get to my shop.

    "Longer bottom bracket axle" is a bike fit vocabulary which I have not even aware of until today. It seems an important part of a correct fitting, but very few discussions here, compare to other variables such as saddle height, seat tube angle.

    I search the web, but bottom bracket sizing only involves "spindle length" and "shell width". I don't think I am looking at the right place. Do you have info on how to lengthen bottom bracket axle to fit a wider stand?

    Ths
    Chris

  7. #7
    wim
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    "Bottom bracket axle" is just another word for "spindle." It's the shaft the cranks are attached to. A longer spindle will move the cranks away from the frame. Technically, changing spindle length is not really a part of normal bike fitting. I mentioned this course of action only because you seem to have an unusual problem,

    Go to a good bike shop with your bike and have then put you on a stationary trainer. Let the shop's fit guru observe you pedal. You need to find out what your legs and feet are doing as you pedal your bike. I know you're interested in physical therapy, so it would be an good experience for you. Good luck!

  8. #8
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    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    "Bottom bracket axle" is just another word for "spindle." It's the shaft the cranks are attached to. A longer spindle will move the cranks away from the frame. Technically, changing spindle length is not really a part of normal bike fitting. I mentioned this course of action only because you seem to have an unusual problem,

    Go to a good bike shop with your bike and have then put you on a stationary trainer. Let the shop's fit guru observe you pedal. You need to find out what your legs and feet are doing as you pedal your bike. I know you're interested in physical therapy, so it would be an good experience for you. Good luck!
    you are one good man. I need to hang around LSB more. let you know later what happens to my bike.

    thanks

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