Another wind thread: When is too much wind, too much?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 67
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Ventruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5,263

    Another wind thread: When is too much wind, too much?

    I had this thought the whole day after quitting my ride 2 miles in what would seem to be ~35mi/h wind. I've HTFU'd to get going with 25mi winds through my summer, but never this. Been thinking to myself, was this me being soft, or was I just being resonable?

    I was mashing the whole time, couldn't produce any rythm similar to climbing, and I couldn't get anywhere above 18mi/h on the flats. I couldn't imagine how that would've been a productive ride for me. If I wanted to muscle up my legs, I would've just been in my house, doing squats.

    Anyhoo, what winds will stop the members of RBR?

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2
    I live on an island so wind blowing off the lake is almost always a constant. Last year I went out in some 40+ winds that were gusting well into the 50's, anyhow I turned a corner put the wind at my back and started sprinting. By the time I got to the next corner I was doing 41mph on a flat road! The corner is 90 degrees with nice banking so I never slowed down, about halfway through the crosswind hit, blew me across two lanes and into a deep drainage ditch. Only a couple of scratches, alot of mud and even more laughs.
    But to answer the question, cycling on the island with big winds is easier because you know every few miles you will change direction and go from a brutal 10mph can't believe I'm out here mash to flying literally like the wind.
    When I am on the mainland and faced with a long road into big winds---Well that doesn't sound like much fun so I'll pack it in and wait for things to calm down.

  3. #3
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
    Reputation: iliveonnitro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,575
    I did a 75mi road race in 35-40mph wind with 60mph gusts. We weren't a pack for very long, and much of it I was in either a 10-15 person group or a 2 person chase.

    It sucked, but HTFU There is rarely an excuse not to ride your bike.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    913
    I remember last year doing a 15-mile ride (really not that long of a ride, but enought to make an impression, nonetheless) in the Outer Banks NC as a tropical storm/hurricane was out at sea. The winds were a steady 45mph head/cross wind, with gusts somwhere into the high-50's mph, riding into the wind it was a battle to maintain 15mph.

    For some strange reason the only true tailwind I had lasted all of 3/4 mile, but when I did get man I was in the biggest gear doing an easy 45mph and looking for a taller gear, felt increadible.

    After that ride, I'll never, ever let wind keep me from getting a ride in!!

    I've also done some windy rides on Grand Island by Niagara Falls, which is pancake flat but pretty much always windy. Fighting the wind is good way to build character I supose, especially if you live where it's flat.

  5. #5
    Adorable Furry Hombre
    Reputation: Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    28,127
    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonnitro
    I did a 75mi road race in 35-40mph wind with 60mph gusts. We weren't a pack for very long, and much of it I was in either a 10-15 person group or a 2 person chase.

    It sucked, but HTFU There is rarely an excuse not to ride your bike.
    Yep I was out in the remnants of a hurricane (literally) that was passing through Nebraska a year ago or so. That was a hard ride, barely able to keep 10mi/hr, and having to work hard to stay upright in the crosswind.

    That was a memorable, tortuous, and fun ride.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  6. #6
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,546
    Nothing better than a horrible headwind or dangerous crosswind to build character. I just love those rides where I get so frustrated I swear out loud when the wind brings me almost to a standstill.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Ventruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5,263
    Well....I guess pretty much everyone here can accept a rough ride just to log miles in. Good to know. If others are willing to do it, I guess I have less of an excuse.

  8. #8
    Lexicon Devil
    Reputation: Doctor Who's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    961


    But seriously, I'll ride/race in pretty much any wind, provided it's not the dangerous kind (see above).

  9. #9
    Resident Curmudgeon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11,971
    A 20 mph wind is enough to blow lawn furniture around. Winds of 40-45 mph become somewhat difficult to stand in. Wind speeds over that are extremely dangerous to go out in whether you're a cyclist or pedestrian, or maybe even a motorist. If you're in a car stopped at a light, and the winds are 30 mph from the side, you'll very noticeably feel the car rocking back & forth.

    I'll go out to ride in 20-25 mph winds, but certainly not over that.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  10. #10
    Descender
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,940
    Here in CO where nothing is flat you have to consider how much you like climbing with a 25mph headwind, or how productive is it when you can walk your bike uphill faster than you can ride it. No matter what you do you will be climbing into the wind.

    I draw the line at 20mph.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Jerry-rigged's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    591
    I asked myself this question many years ago. My answer was to get some clip-on aero-bars. Can't say that I really like them, but on long rides with lots-o-wind, they are a life saver; or at least a leg-saver.
    Veni, Vidi, Vomiti.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: spade2you's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    12,085
    I say 30's, but I hate cross winds because I'm very light.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Treker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    381
    I personally don't let the wind bother me too much. If I did, then there wouldn't be very many opportunities to ride up here in Minnesota. That being said, I'll cut it off at about 20 mph or so, which thankfully doesn't happen very often.

    When I do ride in the wind, which is fairly frequently, I will head into the wind on the first half of the ride (recreational and training rides), and then ride with the wind on my way back. On my way out I look at it like a hard climb. On the way back I get to fly with the wind, which is like riding a fast decent.

    I think a lot of it is in how you look at it. If you think about it, we always ride in the wind. It's just that most of the time it is wind of our own making. Riding in the wind builds character. It's all good!

    Jay B.
    Treker
    'It is a good day to ride."

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: siclmn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    689
    I was riding in a wind storm today in Eastern Washington. The cars could only do about 40 and that's all I could do also. My motorcycle was at a very steep angle just to go straight down the road. Oh wait a minute, wrong forum, never mind.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    595
    I had a memorable ride last spring where I rode 25 miles into a 25mph sustained headwind with 40mph gusts . I looped around and headed home with those same winds at my back...fun times now

    Must mention...tall profile, aero rims are NOT so good in crosswinds!

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: gamara's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,113
    I live in Canada & I pretty much rode every month so far this year & last year. I have to say though, that I've been noticing that the winds are much worse than the year before. I'm not the only one to comment on this as are my riding buddies.

    We were out in the spring this year with 40 + mph winds like everyday. I think I was in 39x19 & just giving it most of the time. I'm not sure if its global warming thats creating all these winds but it is very noticeable. For me its not a question of being "soft" if I don't go out cause its too windy but more of I've got to get out of the house cause I'm going stir crazy sitting around. Besides when you head out into a headwind, when you turn around for the return you get an awesome tailwind.

    I think that perhaps in your case maybe you were tired or overtrained. In that case its ok to take a day off here or there. Its just your body telling you need to take a break.

  17. #17
    Master of my Domain
    Reputation: RonSchon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    471
    I will go in 20ish, but not over that. It does build character, and keeps you appreciating the perfect days, but those 30-40mph days here in CO usually mean inclement weather is only a short ways off.

    It always make me laugh tho, in the 20 range. There is this really long uphill stretch that I usually can hold mid 15's on, going up it in the wind some days if its just right at me and steady, I fight for 10. Really fight. That 2 miles seems much longer on the out than the back. At 30mph I'm through it faster than I'd like.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    913
    Quote Originally Posted by RonSchon
    I will go in 20ish, but not over that. It does build character, and keeps you appreciating the perfect days, but those 30-40mph days here in CO usually mean inclement weather is only a short ways off.
    I do remember living east of Denver. When it started to smell like livestock, or the tumbleweeds would start coming in like crazy, it wasn't exactly safe to go out for a ride, as they were signs (for me, at least) that the heavens were about to open up.

  19. #19
    pgk
    pgk is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    211
    A buddy of mine and I went down to Daytona beach for spring break, and the day we arrived it was 80, sunny, and 35mph winds with 40 plus gusts. We past on a ride that day. It was more windy than we are accustomed too, so we would usually ride first thing in the morning before the wind would really kick up. At home I'll ride when the winds are around or up too 25mph, but when the gusts start kicking in at over 35-40mph I'll crack open a cold one instead.

  20. #20
    The Cube
    Reputation: kmunny19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,107
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky
    Nothing better than a horrible headwind or dangerous crosswind to build character. I just love those rides where I get so frustrated I swear out loud when the wind brings me almost to a standstill.
    as long as I ride hard throughout the ride, its good, windy, wet, up or down hill.

    I generally have 2 hours to ride, 3-4 times per week. as long as I ride hard and my legs feel the same after each ride, I don't really care how many miles it was. so if wind, or hills or some other form of resistance slow me down, but I feel I rode how I wanted, all's well.
    K$

  21. #21
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    I wonder where you guys get your windspeed measurements from?? Do you carry an aenometer with you? Let me guess: those figures come from the weather reports....well you should know that these figures come from measurements taken 10 feet above the ground, in some stretch of land without any obstructions like buildings or trees. Substract 35-50% from those figures, and you'll get the average wind at ground level.

    Which makes a lot of sense, because in real 50 mph winds most people would have severe difficulty in keeping their footing, much less ride a bike.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    913
    Quote Originally Posted by Sriajuda
    I wonder where you guys get your windspeed measurements from?? Do you carry an aenometer with you? Let me guess: those figures come from the weather reports....well you should know that these figures come from measurements taken 10 feet above the ground, in some stretch of land without any obstructions like buildings or trees. Substract 35-50% from those figures, and you'll get the average wind at ground level.

    Which makes a lot of sense, because in real 50 mph winds most people would have severe difficulty in keeping their footing, much less ride a bike.
    Yeah, on the ride I took along the Outer Banks while a hurricane/tropical storm was skirting the islands I relied on the weather station info. But, as the island I was on was completely exposed to the ocean with no trees, buildings, fences, or pretty much anything else sticking up out of the ground, I'll say the steady 45mph winds I claimed are fairly accurate.

    I totally agree with you in regards to various obstructions, however. The winds I experienced when living in Colorado, east of Denver where the landscape was pretty much a prarie, were much more intense than even the windiest day in Central VA with all the trees, even when the weather service reporting similar wind speeds.

  23. #23
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    According to the famous 'kreuzotter' bicycle power calculator, you would need the following wattage to ride at 15 mph into the wind:

    20 mph - 322 W
    30 mph - 512 W
    40 mph - 748 W
    50 mph - 1032 W

    I'm sure a lot of you guys have battled gusty headwinds valiantly, but get real. If you could ride into a 50 mph headwind, you ought to knock at Astana's door - I hear they'll have a vacancy next year.

  24. #24
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by kichef'nbike
    Last year I went out in some 40+ winds that were gusting well into the 50's, anyhow I turned a corner put the wind at my back and started sprinting. By the time I got to the next corner I was doing 41mph on a flat road!
    Assuming that you can output 500 Watts sprinting, and plugging your speed of 41 mph into the 'kreuzotter' calculator, gives you a tailwind of a whopping...16 mph!!

    Even if you were not sprinting but rather just pedaling, lets say, at 200 Watts, the same calculation gives a tailwind of 28 mph.

    But being a sailor for more than 20 years, I know that hardly anything gets more overestimated than wind speeds. Not even wave heights or the size of caught fish. ;)

  25. #25
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    PS: This is the bike power calculator (Kreuzotter) I used:

    http://www.noping.net/english/

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.