Any reason not to get a Vortex (aside from price)
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  1. #1

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    Question Any reason not to get a Vortex (aside from price)

    I am a former lurker and just signed up for the site . I would be most grateful if someone might give me some advice before I spend my children's college money on a new toy.

    I used to ride a road bike in the days of Sun Tour but stopped during school, grad work, new kids, etc. I had a fling with mountain biking but it takes me too long to get to the trails and back. I also tend to fall and hurt myself more than I like.

    With these things in mind, I plan on getting a road bike soon for group rides, solo rides, fitness, Blue Ridge Parkway, etc. I might race a little but don't have expectations of being more than a causal racer. I expect that I will ride a fair amount and, while my wife is still willing, I want to go ahead and commit to the bike that I will enjoy and ride the most.

    I am 36, 6'0", 175 lbs, and in pretty good shape. Already on a regular work out routine several days per week.

    It seems to me that the LS Vortex might be the way to go. Leaning towards Dura Ace components. Any strong disagreement with this direction or other factors I might need to consider?

  2. #2

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    This will spawn a litany of

    arguments against buying the Vortex. You will hear that you should go custom or get something more unique and less common. BLAH BLAH BLAH.
    My suggestion is to go out and ride one and make up your mind. There aren't any "better" bikes out there as far as quality and performance. I mean, that all high end bikes will give you ultra performance, but the Vortex will be much more durable than an aluminum or carbon frame over the long haul.
    You will hear that you should go for a Serotta, Seven, Moots, IF etc etc rather than the LS because they are far superior in quality control and fit. Trust me, get a Vortex that fits and you will be just as fast and comfortable. I ride a 2002 Vortex which is great as well as an older LS Classic which is my favorite. I also have a Trek 5500 which for the $ is fantastic. Each has its strong points. Personally, if I were you, I would look at the Tuscany and bank the rest. Too bad Colorado Cyclist just blew out this frame at $1100 with carbon fork. Awesome bike, but if you want the ultimate high end cost LS, get the Vortex and have no regrets.
    Personally, I like the Vortex's high tech styling compared to the Seven, Serotta or Moots although they are all great bikes. Just don't let anyone dissuade you from contemplating the Vortex purely on it being more common. That is total BS, there aren't that many on the road, especially the newer ones. LS is just more of a marketing presence at that creates for a misconception that they sell a million Vortexes per year. Plus they are as painstakingly handmade as all the smaller bike companies. I heard even more so due to the shaping of the tubes and welding of the seams. LS will tell you that they never seen a Vortex fail at the seam. FYI, if any ti frame doesn't crack at joints in first year, odds are it will last forever.

  3. #3
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    hmmm.....

    Okay let's see..... The vortex is fast, looks fawking awesome, kicks arse! light, has been used to TDF victories, comfortable, stiff but cost an arm and leg and perhaps your kidneys as well.

    Dura Ace? I would rather go for Chorus or Record, since we don't need two kidneys and can ride with one arm.

    They say the vortex uses seamed tubing which are tubes formed by folding sheets of Ti and welding them. They also say that the butting is external which means that they are grinded down externally which is why they are so light weight. They also mention that it is so stiff that they actually feel more like Alu frames now, so why pay for a Ti frame in the first place? So are they as durable as their Ti counterparts? No one knows because no one has broken one yet..... without getting a replacement because of the lifetime warranty.

    All great choices. But you want a reason not to chose a Litespeed Vortex? I will try and give you one....

    An Airborne Zeppelin. If you are not serious about racing, it will do you with enough cash for the downpayment for that country home you promised your mom when you were 15.

    Regards,
    Sean

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    There is no reason not to buy one if you want it.

    However, there may be some things you want to consider, assuming you haven't already.

    One is that the frame is 6/4 ti. If you are interested, Tom Kellogg, designer of Merlin frames and owner of Spectrum Custom, has an article on 6/4 vs. 3/2.5 ti. Here's the link:

    http://spectrum-cycles.com/624.htm

    I'm a biased Spectrum owner who is trying very hard to keep my mouth shut.

    You can't go wrong with Dura Ace, but I am partial to Record for aesthetic reasons. I also like the mouse ear thumb actuator for shifting, but there are those who don't.

    Perhaps you could share your reasons for being attracted to the Vortex specifically. If you are most concerned about getting a bike that fits you best, you can't beat a knowledgeable bike fitter.

    Paul

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    The goofy headset?

    Before you buy one, also try a Tuscany and a Classic. LS is nice but for Vortex money I'd look at Moots, IF or Serotta.

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    One thing to keep in mind if you're coming into road riding as a virgin is the amazing ammount of peripherial equipment you're going to inevitably need; shoes, clothing, helmet, packs, tools... You can easily figure to spend about another $500, $600, $700+ on top of the cost of the bike. And this does not include an extra set of wheels, a roof rack for your car, a trainer for winter, or the diamond you're going to have to buy for your wife as a peace offering for dropping all this bread on a "toy"

    Keep this all in mind, but do not let it prohibit you from getting what you really want (which sounds like the LS) otherwise it'll cost you double in a year when you sell the old bike to make room for the one you truly desire. Also keep in mind that once you've had a taste you're going to want to keep buying bikes (it's a given-just ask anyone.)

    All in all, the best advice is really to have a long chat with shop employees from different shops (to get differing opinions) and then do alot of test riding. The bike that feels the best and satisfies the lust factor is the one you should buy. (just tell the wife it cost a grand less that it did... )
    "I don't know, trying is the first step towards failure." -Homer

  7. #7
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    Tuscany

    The Tuscany has the same geometry but has a reputation for having a smoother ride than the Vortex

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    Quote Originally Posted by purplepaul
    However, there may be some things you want to consider, assuming you haven't already.

    One is that the frame is 6/4 ti. If you are interested, Tom Kellogg, designer of Merlin frames and owner of Spectrum Custom, has an article on 6/4 vs. 3/2.5 ti. Here's the link:

    http://spectrum-cycles.com/624.htm

    I'm a biased Spectrum owner who is trying very hard to keep my mouth shut.

    You can't go wrong with Dura Ace, but I am partial to Record for aesthetic reasons. I also like the mouse ear thumb actuator for shifting, but there are those who don't.

    Perhaps you could share your reasons for being attracted to the Vortex specifically. If you are most concerned about getting a bike that fits you best, you can't beat a knowledgeable bike fitter.

    Paul
    Thanks for everyone's help and comments. I am leaning toward the Vortex initially based on recommendations from friends. The decision will ultimately depend on getting a great fit. If it is not there, I would keep looking.

    I have looked briefly at the Serotta but I am a little intimidated with trying to make custom decisions from a newbie standpoint. I will also look at some other models such as Merlin, Seven (?), etc.

    I have found it pretty easy to research the LS line so I feel comfortably knowing that I am not too far off base. I like the Votex because it seems you can't go wrong with it but that thought is what gives rise to the post. Alright, it also looks good. I know I probably won't ever have some super sports car but at least I can get a cool bike.

  9. #9
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    I ride a Chorus-equipped Tuscany

    I'm a recreational rider who likes longer rides. The Tuscany is a wonderful bike - IF IT FITS YOU. I've had it for a couple years and have thousands of miles on it. It completely broke me of bike lust for other machines. I appreciate the differences and strengths of other nice bikes, but I wouldn't trade my Tuscany for any of them.

    (I am getting another bike, but it's being configured quite differently, so it's not a replacement, but rather supplements the Tuscany - or so I tell my wife.)

    Dura Ace is great, but so are Chorus and Record. I'd give the Campy stuff a look. Check the fit in your hands of the different systems. Chorus now is much like Recod last year.

    You will be surprised at how much other stuff you'll be spending moeny on at first. Shorts, jerseys, shoes, helmet, computer, and on and on. The money you save with a Tuscany will be spent on other stuff before your first ride.

  10. #10

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    Don't be worried about the fitting process with the Serotta. It is actually quite fun. Do a lot of research though. But get what you want in your heart. Get what you want.


  11. #11
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    Serotta, Merlin, Seven, IF, Moots, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by PVW23
    Thanks for everyone's help and comments. I am leaning toward the Vortex initially based on recommendations from friends. The decision will ultimately depend on getting a great fit. If it is not there, I would keep looking.

    I have looked briefly at the Serotta but I am a little intimidated with trying to make custom decisions from a newbie standpoint. I will also look at some other models such as Merlin, Seven (?), etc.

    I have found it pretty easy to research the LS line so I feel comfortably knowing that I am not too far off base. I like the Votex because it seems you can't go wrong with it but that thought is what gives rise to the post. Alright, it also looks good. I know I probably won't ever have some super sports car but at least I can get a cool bike.
    I have a 1999 Vortex. Bought it after 25+ years on steel frames. You really can't go wrong with the bike although there are lots of options out there. More importantly, I'd make sure that the frame fits you, regardless of manufacturer. The frame will likely outlast you unless you have an accident so take your time in selecting the frame. I've never had a problem with mine and their service is quite good if you ever need some help.

    I've had 3 custom steels and also a C-40 but I still think highly of the Vortex, both in terms of fit (for me), ride quality and consistency of build.

  12. #12
    Juanmoretime
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    If the Vortex fits you correctly, everything else will fall in place.

    I own a 1997 Vortex that is on it's thrid set of components, the first 2 were Dura Ace and now it wears Campy Record. I like the Record much better than the Dura Ace although I am ruuning the FSA Carbon Pro Team Issue crank with the ISIS Ultimate Ti bottom bracket. I've owned many bikes and several while owned the Vortex. Many have come and gone and the Vortex stays. Every time I ride my Vortex I like it even a little more, it's a keeper for life just as my S.O. is. If it fits you like a glove and you like the ride, buy it, you won't regret it. It's all about the fit and if it's right with the Vortex for you, you will have met your soulmate.

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    I know a lot of people who have held onto their Vortexes

    throughout the years. It is that good of a bike. The guys who own the LBS I go to still have their original frames, painted them several times and yet have owned so many other frames. These include the Colnago Ferarri bike, custom Merlins, Pinarellos, Fondriest, Giants etc etc.
    I must say though that the Giants seem to be the ride of choice for racing though. All the racers on the team ride Giant compacts either al or carbon. The Vortex has been indestructible though. I personally prefer the older more rounded tubes of the Vortex, but the new one is REALLY nice all built up.



    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmoretime
    I own a 1997 Vortex that is on it's thrid set of components, the first 2 were Dura Ace and now it wears Campy Record. I like the Record much better than the Dura Ace although I am ruuning the FSA Carbon Pro Team Issue crank with the ISIS Ultimate Ti bottom bracket. I've owned many bikes and several while owned the Vortex. Many have come and gone and the Vortex stays. Every time I ride my Vortex I like it even a little more, it's a keeper for life just as my S.O. is. If it fits you like a glove and you like the ride, buy it, you won't regret it. It's all about the fit and if it's right with the Vortex for you, you will have met your soulmate.

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    Let the flames fly.

    Before I begin, please let me say that everything I am about to say is personal opinion which has been derived from my personal experiences and knowledge about brands and fit. I work at a store in Kansas that has Moots, Serotta, Seven, and Litespeed and I have been trained in the Serotta fit method. The previous posts have been correct to a certain degree. I will agree that no matter what bike you get fit is the ket component. However, I disagree to a certain point that all build qualities/ti quality are identical. Let me address what I feel to be strengths and weaknesses of Serotta, Seven, and Litespeed.

    First the Litespeed Vortex... Someone posted earlier that the Litespeed has butting. This is incorrect. All Litespeed bikes are straight guage ti, meaning all the same thickness. What they have going for them is the G.E.T. This is the tube shapes that give them such a radical look. As far as the Vortex goes there is some disadvantage going with a Litespeed 6/4 ti bike. Like many have said before they 6/4 ti Litespeed sources arrive in sheets. First the grain pattern isn't designed to be turned into tubes. This degrades the ride quality. Second they weld the sheets into tubes. While they may have impecable durability records the seam acts as a hard point in the tube also degrading the ride quality. Third, 6/4 ti is a very hard metal to deal with. Usually there is a very high amount of scoring within the ti that occasionally creates weak points within the ti. Overall the bike is good, relatively stiff with a little less attention to the fine details. Great bike if you don't want to wait for custom.

    Next comes Serotta. IMHO no one makes a better Ti frame than Serotta. Both the Legend and Concours are 3/2.5 ti frames that are swaged and then internally butted to the nth degree. The tubes are larger diameter towards the bottom bracket increasing stiffness while the tube narrows towards to top to increase comfort. Both chain and seatstays remain 100% round all the way to the drop out increasing the integrity of the tubes (cheaper ti frames cut the stays diagonally or pinch the stay and then weld to the drop out). Serotta also has the most comprehensive fit system out there. Not only do they take into account limb length, but they also take into account hamstring and hipflexor flexibility. The welds are absolutely immaculate and the ride quality is always spot on.

    Finally, Seven. This company is the hottest thing going at the shop right now. For those of you who don't know the company, it is out of Watertown Mass... They employ about 35 employees and was started by an ex-Merlin employee (Rob Vandermark). Seven makes nice frames (somewhere between LS and Serotta IMO). What cool about Seven is there fit system. We take about 12 body measurements and send them to Seven. A fit expert will call the customer and interview them for about an hour with topics ranging from current riding discomfort, to future goals, to custom build requirements (i.e. a 1.5" headtube for a headshock). Seven then sends us positionals which we use to set up a bike. After a test ride the customer signs off on the bike and it goes into production. Total time about 4-5 weeks. The bike is truly custom, not just by tube length, but also tube diameters and butt placements/lengths. One may truly dial in one's fit. They use 3/2.5 ti as well. There mantra is fit by the numbers not by sight (people may develop bad habits over time and what "looks" good may not be the ideal fit). Seven takes care in there frame production welding each frame 1.5 cm at a time, checking alignment, all the while staggering their welds to maintain proper alignment. (LS bends the frames in order to align the frame resulting in fatiguing the ti since its after the anealing process). In fact Seven has about 24 alignment checks per frame resulting in the straightest possible frame. Seven also has a 100% frame fit guarantee.

    I know i've spit out a lot of information and why I agree that the beginner to intermediate cyclist may not be able to tell/appreciate the differences in frame building techniques, but look at it from this perspective. Why should someone pay $5k + for a bike not built for them? I mean if the price is all the same, might as well get something made just for you. Sure you can make an off the shelf LS work for 90% of the riders out there, but at what expense? Each bike is engineered around a certain stem length. Increasing/decreasing will ultimately degrade the handling/balance of the finished product.

    As far as the components go that's your call. Both Dura Ace 10sp. and Campy Chorus/Record will get the job done with you beaming during your ride. I'm going to fit a woman to a Seven Alaris tomorrow with 2004 Campy Chorus. The third Seven for me in the last 6 weeks. The first two were both decked out in Campy and the guys are absolutely thrilled. I hope this information has helped out a little bit. But to those people who tell you a LS is the same as a Serotta which is the same as a Seven simply don't know better. Do your homework, spend the money to get fit no matter what bike, and then let the credit card rip. Keep the rubber side down.

  15. #15
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    Paul, can you post a picture of your bike?

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    I don't think anyone said LS was the same as any of the other

    bike companies, but from a performance standpoint and overall quality, any of these high end bikes are comparable. I remember back in the say when the Vortex WAS the most coveted bike on the planet and it has always gotten great reviews from professional reviewers.
    It has lost its sense of mystique due to it being around for so long, and Serotta Moots and Seven etc appear to most as being "better" because of customization and the like, but if the Vortex fits a person, it is plain and simple, one of the best rides one can buy. I defy you to show me a Vortex that has had an issue at one of the seams. Seriously, I know people who have been riding and racing the same Vortex since 1996 and 1997 without as much as a scratch. Go figure. Seven has its own BS marketing scheme with the 1-10 scales of stiffness etc. I almost got the 7 Axiom and it was a sweet sweet bike, but the Vortex felt faster in steering and overall road manners.



    Quote Originally Posted by castelliscorpion
    Before I begin, please let me say that everything I am about to say is personal opinion which has been derived from my personal experiences and knowledge about brands and fit. I work at a store in Kansas that has Moots, Serotta, Seven, and Litespeed and I have been trained in the Serotta fit method. The previous posts have been correct to a certain degree. I will agree that no matter what bike you get fit is the ket component. However, I disagree to a certain point that all build qualities/ti quality are identical. Let me address what I feel to be strengths and weaknesses of Serotta, Seven, and Litespeed.

    First the Litespeed Vortex... Someone posted earlier that the Litespeed has butting. This is incorrect. All Litespeed bikes are straight guage ti, meaning all the same thickness. What they have going for them is the G.E.T. This is the tube shapes that give them such a radical look. As far as the Vortex goes there is some disadvantage going with a Litespeed 6/4 ti bike. Like many have said before they 6/4 ti Litespeed sources arrive in sheets. First the grain pattern isn't designed to be turned into tubes. This degrades the ride quality. Second they weld the sheets into tubes. While they may have impecable durability records the seam acts as a hard point in the tube also degrading the ride quality. Third, 6/4 ti is a very hard metal to deal with. Usually there is a very high amount of scoring within the ti that occasionally creates weak points within the ti. Overall the bike is good, relatively stiff with a little less attention to the fine details. Great bike if you don't want to wait for custom.

    Next comes Serotta. IMHO no one makes a better Ti frame than Serotta. Both the Legend and Concours are 3/2.5 ti frames that are swaged and then internally butted to the nth degree. The tubes are larger diameter towards the bottom bracket increasing stiffness while the tube narrows towards to top to increase comfort. Both chain and seatstays remain 100% round all the way to the drop out increasing the integrity of the tubes (cheaper ti frames cut the stays diagonally or pinch the stay and then weld to the drop out). Serotta also has the most comprehensive fit system out there. Not only do they take into account limb length, but they also take into account hamstring and hipflexor flexibility. The welds are absolutely immaculate and the ride quality is always spot on.

    Finally, Seven. This company is the hottest thing going at the shop right now. For those of you who don't know the company, it is out of Watertown Mass... They employ about 35 employees and was started by an ex-Merlin employee (Rob Vandermark). Seven makes nice frames (somewhere between LS and Serotta IMO). What cool about Seven is there fit system. We take about 12 body measurements and send them to Seven. A fit expert will call the customer and interview them for about an hour with topics ranging from current riding discomfort, to future goals, to custom build requirements (i.e. a 1.5" headtube for a headshock). Seven then sends us positionals which we use to set up a bike. After a test ride the customer signs off on the bike and it goes into production. Total time about 4-5 weeks. The bike is truly custom, not just by tube length, but also tube diameters and butt placements/lengths. One may truly dial in one's fit. They use 3/2.5 ti as well. There mantra is fit by the numbers not by sight (people may develop bad habits over time and what "looks" good may not be the ideal fit). Seven takes care in there frame production welding each frame 1.5 cm at a time, checking alignment, all the while staggering their welds to maintain proper alignment. (LS bends the frames in order to align the frame resulting in fatiguing the ti since its after the anealing process). In fact Seven has about 24 alignment checks per frame resulting in the straightest possible frame. Seven also has a 100% frame fit guarantee.

    I know i've spit out a lot of information and why I agree that the beginner to intermediate cyclist may not be able to tell/appreciate the differences in frame building techniques, but look at it from this perspective. Why should someone pay $5k + for a bike not built for them? I mean if the price is all the same, might as well get something made just for you. Sure you can make an off the shelf LS work for 90% of the riders out there, but at what expense? Each bike is engineered around a certain stem length. Increasing/decreasing will ultimately degrade the handling/balance of the finished product.

    As far as the components go that's your call. Both Dura Ace 10sp. and Campy Chorus/Record will get the job done with you beaming during your ride. I'm going to fit a woman to a Seven Alaris tomorrow with 2004 Campy Chorus. The third Seven for me in the last 6 weeks. The first two were both decked out in Campy and the guys are absolutely thrilled. I hope this information has helped out a little bit. But to those people who tell you a LS is the same as a Serotta which is the same as a Seven simply don't know better. Do your homework, spend the money to get fit no matter what bike, and then let the credit card rip. Keep the rubber side down.

  17. #17
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    Seven vs. Serotta

    Quote Originally Posted by castelliscorpion
    Next comes Serotta. IMHO no one makes a better Ti frame than Serotta. Both the Legend and Concours are 3/2.5 ti frames that are swaged and then internally butted to the nth degree. The tubes are larger diameter towards the bottom bracket increasing stiffness while the tube narrows towards to top to increase comfort. Both chain and seatstays remain 100% round all the way to the drop out increasing the integrity of the tubes (cheaper ti frames cut the stays diagonally or pinch the stay and then weld to the drop out). Serotta also has the most comprehensive fit system out there. Not only do they take into account limb length, but they also take into account hamstring and hipflexor flexibility. The welds are absolutely immaculate and the ride quality is always spot on.

    Finally, Seven. This company is the hottest thing going at the shop right now. For those of you who don't know the company, it is out of Watertown Mass... They employ about 35 employees and was started by an ex-Merlin employee (Rob Vandermark). Seven makes nice frames (somewhere between LS and Serotta IMO). What cool about Seven is there fit system. We take about 12 body measurements and send them to Seven. A fit expert will call the customer and interview them for about an hour with topics ranging from current riding discomfort, to future goals, to custom build requirements (i.e. a 1.5" headtube for a headshock). Seven then sends us positionals which we use to set up a bike. After a test ride the customer signs off on the bike and it goes into production. Total time about 4-5 weeks. The bike is truly custom, not just by tube length, but also tube diameters and butt placements/lengths. One may truly dial in one's fit. They use 3/2.5 ti as well. There mantra is fit by the numbers not by sight (people may develop bad habits over time and what "looks" good may not be the ideal fit). Seven takes care in there frame production welding each frame 1.5 cm at a time, checking alignment, all the while staggering their welds to maintain proper alignment. (LS bends the frames in order to align the frame resulting in fatiguing the ti since its after the anealing process). In fact Seven has about 24 alignment checks per frame resulting in the straightest possible frame. Seven also has a 100% frame fit guarantee.
    You said Serotta makes the best frames and that Seven is between LS and Serotta. You gave both builders a glowing review. So why do you think Serotta is better than Seven?

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    Does it really matter what this guy thinks?

    When I got my Vortex, I test rode the Seven and Merlin and came to my own conclusion. It would be like me looing to buy a Lexus, Mercedes, BMW or Infiniti. They are all great cars, but is one really "better" than the other? Some knucklehead would say the stitching in one leather seat is better, but all in all, they are all luxury cars. To answer this guys question, aside from price is there a reason not to buy the LS, no one has given him an answer.





    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    You said Serotta makes the best frames and that Seven is between LS and Serotta. You gave both builders a glowing review. So why do you think Serotta is better than Seven?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by castelliscorpion
    Like many have said before they 6/4 ti Litespeed sources arrive in sheets. First the grain pattern isn't designed to be turned into tubes. This degrades the ride quality. Second they weld the sheets into tubes. While they may have impecable durability records the seam acts as a hard point in the tube also degrading the ride quality.
    What do you mean by "degrades the ride quality"?

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    LOL, my Vortex feels like a

    Dodge Aries K with a broken axel coming down a mountain on bald tires and no brakes.





    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Chinaski
    What do you mean by "degrades the ride quality"?

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    Re: Does it really matter what this guy thinks?

    Absolutely! This is an online forum ... full of what people think. That's why we all post and read here ... go learn what other people think.

    This guy has a lot of experience and I value his perspective. I wouldn't take it as gospel. But I'll take his opinion for what it's worth.

    I think a lot of people have given him answers.

    But ultimately, I agree with you. He can't really go wrong with the Vortex if it fits him well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazywriter
    When I got my Vortex, I test rode the Seven and Merlin and came to my own conclusion. It would be like me looing to buy a Lexus, Mercedes, BMW or Infiniti. They are all great cars, but is one really "better" than the other? Some knucklehead would say the stitching in one leather seat is better, but all in all, they are all luxury cars. To answer this guys question, aside from price is there a reason not to buy the LS, no one has given him an answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazywriter
    When I got my Vortex, I test rode the Seven and Merlin and came to my own conclusion. It would be like me looing to buy a Lexus, Mercedes, BMW or Infiniti. They are all great cars, but is one really "better" than the other? Some knucklehead would say the stitching in one leather seat is better, but all in all, they are all luxury cars. To answer this guys question, aside from price is there a reason not to buy the LS, no one has given him an answer.
    Lazywriter, this is where you miss the point. A BMW is purchased for the handling and stick shift. A mercedes is purchased for the luxurious ride; but you can get some stiff sway bars and and some race shocks for $800 and it will outhandle a beemer. Infiniti for low cost with cheap interiors and power for young people, Lexus for good reputation regarding problems, etc... Don't take me literally or try to correct what I am trying to say about the cars, because you all get the point.

    It depends what you want. I started out looking for a litespeed classic, then moved up to the vortex, then decided on the Seven Axiom, then the Serotta Legend, then read up on the qualities of steel frames and decided on my current Serotta CSi with Dura Ace, Ksyriums, etc...

    If I could sum up my opinions in a few sentences:

    Research research research!!!

    And don't be like my friend who always gets second best. A bike is a relatively cheap purchase compared to the least expensive new car out there. Get what you want, and don't settle for less than what you want if you are just talking a grand or two.

    Get the best you can afford, and ride it.

    The honorable and true,

    spankdoggie

  23. #23
    Censored by *********
    Reputation: purplepaul's Avatar
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    Nov 2002
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    Here you go...

    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    Paul, can you post a picture of your bike?
    What you can't see is that the paint changes color, from blue to a rich purple, depending on the angle.

    It's Campy Record except for the Phil Wood Ti BB, Chris King Headset, Bold Ti seat post, Wipperman chain and Coombe pedals.

    Wheels are Neutron tubies.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  24. #24
    BS the DC
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
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    Feb 2002
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    1,422

    Beautiful bike

    Beautiful bike. Spectrum is way up on my list for a custom ti bike. Did you go get fit personally or did you send in your measurements and pictures?

  25. #25
    Juanmoretime
    Reputation: Juanmoretime's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    Wink I love my degraded ride quality!

    I think Lazywriter does too.

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