anyone go from lemond to colnago?
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  1. #1
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    anyone go from lemond to colnago?

    anyone go from a lemond to a colnago? how does fit differ? looking at geometry charts doesn't really help me. i'ld like to know how fit differed. what size lemond did you have and what colnago did you end up with?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Start with seat tube c-c. This will bring you to a Colnago with a shorter top-tube yet a bit taller head-tube (depending on the size).

    The rest is up to you, do you want to reduce your drop(raise the handlebars without spacers)? Then go 2 cm larger as the top-tube will be about the same as a comparable Lemond. Keeping the same drop, a Colnago will give you 1-2cm shorter top-tube which is easily offset by stem length. But, in smaller sizes with steeper seat-tubes, the shorter top-tube effect is negated.

    I ride a 55 Lemond (55 x 56.5 c-c), and if I could pick up a Colnago tomorrow, it would be a 57 (55 x 55.6 c-c, with a 15.8 cm head tube which is 2.5 cm taller than the Lemond). FWIW, Lemond has fixed the HT (IMHO) issue with an extension ( la Pegoretti) this year.

    Just my rant,

  3. #3
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    be more specific....

    Lemonds are measured c-c. Colnago has both c-c and c-t measurements clearly listed on the geometry charts. Colnago's vary considerably in their geometry through the size range. You can't just compare any size and get a valid answer. What size Lemond do you ride?

  4. #4
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    Competitive cyclist (sponsor of this forum) has a very good Colnago geometry chart. Click on your right!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-40
    Lemonds are measured c-c. Colnago has both c-c and c-t measurements clearly listed on the geometry charts. Colnago's vary considerably in their geometry through the size range. You can't just compare any size and get a valid answer. What size Lemond do you ride?
    this is actually something for my wife. she is currently riding a 53 c-c she 'inherited'. but she needs something a bit smaller. i think i'll have to take her test riding some more. i've just seen some nice vintage colnagos on ebay that are/were 52-53 bikes and thought about picking one of those up for her.

    i was wondering if she feels the lemond is sort of comfortable, tho a bit stretched out, would a smaller colnago thus shorter tt work better?

    we already have 110mm quill stem raised as hi as possible(about 4-5 spacers equiv.) to bring in the bars a bit and raise them up.

  6. #6
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    valid comparison

    The 53 Lemond is very similar to a 55cm Colnago, vertically, but will actually have a bit shorter effective TT length, due to a shallower 73.25 degree seat tube angle.

    You need to distinguish between needing a frame the is vertically smaller (smaller frame size) and one that merely has a shorter top tube. A "vintage" Colnago would not be a wise choice, IMO.

    To determine if the frame is appropriately sized, take a vertical measurement from the top tube to the top of the saddle, near the nose of the saddle. 16-18cm is a good range.

    You also mention using a 110mm stem raised high to get the bars up to height. A smaller frame will further reduce the bar height, creating more of a problem. A shorter stem would be the first thing to try. Stems are made a lot shorter than 110mm.

    When buying a new frame, the head tube length, which affects the handlebar height should not be ignored. A 2cm smaller frame will only have a 1cm shorter top tube (at most), but will have a 2cm shorter head tube. This will make a small improvement in the stretched out feeling, but create a larger problem with the handlebar height.
    Last edited by C-40; 02-17-2004 at 05:47 AM.

  7. #7
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    I did.

    I rode a Zurich for about 3 years, now it is a single-speed and my main ride is a CT1.

    The fit is pretty different, in retrospect I am not sure the lemond was the the right (or perfect) size for me...when I picked up my 56cm CT1 I went through 3 fit sessions over 3 months to dial it in right. Now I have gone back to the Zurich and set up the fit as near as I could in the same way the CT1 is, and it is pretty differnt. Everone one is right, that Colnago does measure differently. Best to test ride or get fit at your LBS.

    I really believe my CT1 is a perfect fit for me.

  8. #8
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    The diff.

    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    anyone go from a lemond to a colnago? how does fit differ? looking at geometry charts doesn't really help me. i'ld like to know how fit differed. what size lemond did you have and what colnago did you end up with?

    thanks

    If you check the geometry charts you'll see that Lemonds are long in the TT, while the Colnago's are short. I like 'em shorter, so I would pick the Colnago. Whatever works for you.
    Work?! -- Maynard G. Krebs

  9. #9
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    not necessarily true...

    A 53cm Lemond actually has a shorter TT than a Colnago measured 53cm c-c (a 55cm), like the Lemond.

    The Lemond has a 54.5cm TT while the Colnago has a 54.3cm TT. Subtract about 1cm from the TT lenght of the Lemond to compensate for the slack seat tube angle, and it's only 53.5cm, compared to the Colnago. This comparison places a given rider in the same position relative to the bottom bracket.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-40
    A "vintage" Colnago would not be a wise choice, IMO.
    why would it not be a wise choice?

    thanks for your other input. that's been helpful.

  11. #11
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    my take...

    Times change. It's rarely a good idea to buy a frame that requires a quill stem, IMO. There are very few quill stems being sold these days. Quill stems are a pain to change, which does not promote experimentation. A threadless stem can be changed out in 5 minutes. A threadless headset is much simpler to adjust and more likely to stay adjusted. Trying to find an old frame that's not scratched and rusted is also not easy. There are lots of very nice new frames at reasonable prices out there that are very functional, with the current 1-1/8" threadless steerers.

    Take a look at www.gvhbikes.com. Many good values there.

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