Anyone riding a seriuos E bike ?
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  1. #1
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    Anyone riding a serious E bike ?

    Anyone riding a real road E bike ? Something like a Pinarello Nitro or Bianchi Aria Eroad or Focus Paralane,something that turn heads I mean
    If so,care to share ? I'm almost 46,busy with family an ride only 7 months per year ( including flu/cold and vacation time) during winter months,each and every year is becoming increasingly difficult to gain a decent fitness. It's not that I can't do it anymore,it's just recovery times are becoming a true issue and when I push it a bit because I feel good my body feels hammered for 2/3 days. And no,no time to stretch at the gym or whatever else..
    Last edited by Devastazione; 03-11-2019 at 08:25 AM.

  2. #2
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    If you're having trouble maintaining your fitness level why would you want to get an ebike? If your goal is fitness but time is an issue just do shorter rides when you can, every ride doesn't have be a suffer fest leaving you wipped out for days afterward.

    I look at ebikes more for those that have some physical limitations or injuries but still want to enjoy the outdoors.

    I wonder if any studies have been done tracking those using ebikes. Does their fitness level increase or decrease?

    To answer your question...no I have no experience with an ebike, I think it would be fun to ride but wouldn't help my fitness level....but I could be wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cooper1960 View Post
    If you're having trouble maintaining your fitness level why would you want to get an ebike? If your goal is fitness but time is an issue just do shorter rides when you can, every ride doesn't have be a suffer fest leaving you wipped out for days afterward.


    I wonder if any studies have been done tracking those using ebikes. Does their fitness level increase or decrease?

    .
    Define suffer fest. My rides are about 50km,26/28 km per hour average pace and an elevation of about 400/700 meters depending. Doesn't sound like a suffer test to me. I'm 6 ft tall/191 lb. I can be on the heavy side for sure but legs account for a lot of that weight. I lose about 3/4 kilos when I sto riding during summer.
    Anyway after a couple of rides in a row like that I have some very stiff legs when climbing stairs at home. Give me 4/5 days of total rest and I can literally fly on those stairs while holding a couple of water kegs..


    Yes,studies have been done for E MTB and general fitness seemed improved. I'm talking about youngish people,34/37 years old editors testers who had a Specialized Levo to review for about a month
    Last edited by Devastazione; 03-11-2019 at 09:54 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Define suffer fest. My rides are about 50km,26/28 km per hour average pace and an elevation of about 400/700 meters depending. Doesn't sound like a suffer test to me. I'm 6 ft tall/191. I can be on the heavy side for sure but legs account for a lot of that weight. I lose about 3/4 kilos when I sto riding during summer.
    Anyway after a couple of rides in a row like that I have some very stiff legs when climbing stairs at home. Give me 4/5 days of total rest and I can literally fly on those stairs while holding a couple of water kegs..


    Yes,studies have been done for E MTB and general fitness seemed improved. I'm talking about younghish people,34/37 years old editors testers who had a Specialized Levo to review for about a month
    My thinking is similar to Cooper's. You are only 46 and ready to use a "crutch"? I would suggest maybe getting a trainer and trying not to lose so much fitness over the winter. Maybe stretching after your ride would have eliminate some of the recovery issues.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Define suffer fest. My rides are about 50km,26/28 km per hour average pace and an elevation of about 400/700 meters depending. Doesn't sound like a suffer test to me. I'm 6 ft tall/191. I can be on the heavy side for sure but legs account for a lot of that weight. I lose about 3/4 kilos when I sto riding during summer.
    Anyway after a couple of rides in a row like that I have some very stiff legs when climbing stairs at home. Give me 4/5 days of total rest and I can literally fly on those stairs while holding a couple of water kegs..


    Yes,studies have been done for E MTB and general fitness seemed improved. I'm talking about younghish people,34/37 years old editors testers who had a Specialized Levo to review for about a month
    Getting an e-bike isn't going to help you keep fit.

    The problem is you can't find the time to maintain the level of speed and distance you are accustomed to. An electric motor will let you see that speed and distance but won't add fitness doing it. You need to reevaluate your goals. Maybe go a bit slower or the same speed over a shorter distance. Or find an alternative activity that you can squeeze in when the weather is bad, swimming, walking, etc...
    Last edited by Steve B.; 03-11-2019 at 10:40 AM.

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    I have a BMC AMP Cross that I bought specifically for commuting. My commute is 16 miles one way and has about 800 meters of climbing. It's a ride I love to do on my road bike on a weekend or evening ride after work, but in the summer, getting to work drenched in sweat sucks. We don't have showers or lockers, which means carrying all of my work clothes on my back.



    Having the E-bike makes the morning commute a casual light exercise (i still average about 115bpm for an hour - twice a day - similar to a brisk walk), and I don't have to worry about getting to work drenched in sweat. I can ride in street clothes, jump off the bike and be ready to work when I get there.

    I commute pretty early (about 6am), and most (probably 60% by the eye test) of the commuters I see on this route are on e-bikes now. Very few casual cyclists out at that hour.

    I like having it. I find I'm a lot more inclined to ride now, even when the weather is a bit sketchy (too hot/cold). It takes away a lot of the drudgery related to logistics of commuting. I just grab my backpack and go.

    My only concern with my commute is a lack of a secure place to lock up the bike at work. Right now I bring it inside and stash it in a corner of the office, but the building management folks don't like it. I told them I'm not keeping a bike that expensive outside, and asked them to provide access to a secure area to lock it up (our main campus has an indoor secure locker area, but the satellite office, which is new, does not - yet!).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Getting an e-bike isn't going to help you keep fit.
    It's not like riding a motorcycle. I would suggest you take one on a demo ride before you say stuff like this.

    it's certainly not going to qualify for race training (although it could if you wanted to), it's still really good exercise. As I noted in my previous post, with the bike in Eco mode, i still average about 110-120bpm for an hour, twice a day. This is about the equivalent of a brisk walk, or very slow jog. This is great exercise. It burns calories and works large muscle groups, and doesn't put a lot of physical stress on the body. You can recover quickly, and thus do it every day.

    Keep in mind, you can always turn the motor off, or ride faster than the pedal assist speed (25kmh in my case), to increase the HR.

    And by the way, I'm not coming here as a non-cyclist saying this stuff. I've averaged ~9k total miles on road/gravel bikes the last three years (BEFORE I had the E-bike).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    It's not like riding a motorcycle. I would suggest you take one on a demo ride before you say stuff like this.

    it's certainly not going to qualify for race training (although it could if you wanted to), it's still really good exercise. As I noted in my previous post, with the bike in Eco mode, i still average about 110-120bpm for an hour, twice a day. This is about the equivalent of a brisk walk, or very slow jog. This is great exercise. It burns calories and works large muscle groups, and doesn't put a lot of physical stress on the body. You can recover quickly, and thus do it every day.

    Keep in mind, you can always turn the motor off, or ride faster than the pedal assist speed (25kmh in my case), to increase the HR.

    And by the way, I'm not coming here as a non-cyclist saying this stuff. I've averaged ~9k total miles on road/gravel bikes the last three years (BEFORE I had the E-bike).
    This.

    Iím not looking to unlock the engine and speed like a jerk at 50 mph, I still want to pedal and sweat while keeping my hr at 130/150 on the uphills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    This.

    Iím not looking to unlock the engine and speed like a jerk at 50 mph, I still want to pedal and sweat while keeping my hr at 130/150 on the uphills.
    As part of keeping up with a group?

    I'm not sure what you are looking to accomplish. Each and every one of us that didn't win the TDF has some sort of training challenge.

    I don't use a HRM but presumably I could regulate my effort (go slower) to keep it below 130/150. That's free.

    Do you figure going faster under the same or less effort will be more fun? I suppose we all do but accept that cycling is not a motorized sport and accept that our speed given a certain effort is what it is.

    I totally get Ebikes for commuting and perhaps keeping up with friends you wouldn't otherwise be able to ride with on social rides. But fitness is what it is so for a fitness sport I don't really see the point.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    It's not like riding a motorcycle. I would suggest you take one on a demo ride before you say stuff like this.
    You've a valid point so I will re-phrase my comment.

    Riding an e-bike is not going to help you meet the goal of staying fit ENOUGH to maintain the speed and/or distances you are accustomed to when riding a non e-bike.. At the end of the day, it's got a motor that is helping you maintain some of the speed you desire, at the expense of the human motor doing all the work.

    But there are a ton of ways to maintain some of that fitness. Paying for spin classes is likely cheaper and probably as good if not better an exercise.

  11. #11
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    Obligatory

    All main transport buses in area (RTA) have bike racks year round. A good part of the fleet is under wire so when I take my bike aboard, does that qualify as an E-Bike excursion?

    Considering the yearly miles I used to log, there have been a handful of bonks where an alternative like an E-bike would have seemed like the bee's knees. OTOH, most of those years were "weight weenie" years and I could not have justified the extra weight and still held my head up on group rides!

    Alternatives.

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    I want to be clear here. E-Bikes have their purpose. They are a utility vehicle, not a race bike.

    I still do group rides once or twice a week when I have time, and I do them on my road bikes.

    In summer, I ride gravel on most weekends, some times both days. I do this on my Norco Search XR or my Moots Routt RSL, depending on the planned terrain.

    I don't race, or ride competitively in any way. Sure, the group rides can have a competitive bent to them, but I'm not 'training' to win a Wednesday Night Worlds ride. I do those for the fun and fitness when time allows.

    I would not use the E-Bike on a group ride, or in an organized charity event (Fondo/Sportiv, etc..), or even on a weekend epic. In fact, i would not use it in any scenario where close quarters riding is involved (i.e. a paceline).

    It does make commuting to work a lot more feasible and a lot less frustrating (which means I'm a lot more likely to do it). More bike miles, less car miles, more time outside enjoying fresh air and sunshine, and less time in my car grinding through bumper to bumper traffic.

    Edit: Let me put this another way. By riding an E-Bike to work instead of driving, i'm not trading road bike miles for E-Bike miles. I'm trading car commute miles for E-Bike commute miles. There are so many good reasons to do this. I'm pretty sure you don't need me to list them here.


    Edit2:
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    there are a ton of ways to maintain some of that fitness. Paying for spin classes is likely cheaper and probably as good if not better an exercise.


    Why on earth would want to spend time indoors in a spin class? I would pay good money to NOT have to do that.
    Last edited by Finx; 03-11-2019 at 11:31 AM.

  13. #13
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    I completely understand the usage as outlined by Finx. As an economical commuter in the right environment (climate, infrastructure...), it makes perfect sense. You arrive at work ready to go on a mild endorphin high yet not completely drenched in sweat. Especially for those without convenient shower facilities, it's a viable alternative.

    For fitness? Unless there's a physical limitation or you're completely out of shape, I don't understand the cost-benefit here. If you can't go faster/longer, you go slower/shorter and build from there. If you're getting dropped on a group ride, you get dropped until you can hang or you find another ride. You make adjustments to your goals/aspirations, not buy shortcuts to a level of performance that wasn't earned by turning over the pedals. Sorry, to me that's about as bad as mainlining EPO, but I understand some don't see the same ethical parallel.

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    Is root of this thread about fitness or mid life crisis?

    Fitness\ability changes as we age, no getting around that. Better to understand that and make allowances than to expect to keep pace with a younger crowd.
    Or get one of "those" Doctors. The one that hands out the right prescriptions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    I want to be clear here. E-Bikes have their purpose. They are a utility vehicle, not a race bike.

    I still do group rides once or twice a week when I have time, and I do them on my road bikes.

    In summer, I ride gravel on most weekends, some times both days. I do this on my Norco Search XR or my Moots Routt RSL, depending on the planned terrain.

    I don't race, or ride competitively in any way. Sure, the group rides can have a competitive bent to them, but I'm not 'training' to win a Wednesday Night Worlds ride. I do those for the fun and fitness when time allows.

    I would not use the E-Bike on a group ride, or in an organized charity event (Fondo/Sportiv, etc..), or even on a weekend epic. In fact, i would not use it in any scenario where close quarters riding is involved (i.e. a paceline).

    It does make commuting to work a lot more feasible and a lot less frustrating (which means I'm a lot more likely to do it). More bike miles, less car miles, more time outside enjoying fresh air and sunshine, and less time in my car grinding through bumper to bumper traffic.

    Edit: Let me put this another way. By riding an E-Bike to work instead of driving, i'm not trading road bike miles for E-Bike miles. I'm trading car commute miles for E-Bike commute miles. There are so many good reasons to do this. I'm pretty sure you don't need me to list them here.


    Edit2:


    Why on earth would want to spend time indoors in a spin class? I would pay good money to NOT have to do that.
    Not for me either. The OP seemingly doesnít get much time to ride in winter months, thus faces the problem many face of losing fitness over the winter. I swim and will mt. bike. Neither keeps me in shape for hard road rides, but outside of doing something really concentrated in terms of effort level over a short period of time, like spinning, Iím not seeing a great answer, other than just getting on the bike and riding. An E-bike seems to be an expensive and not great answer.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Not for me either. The OP seemingly doesnít get much time to ride in winter months, thus faces the problem many face of losing fitness over the winter. I swim and will mt. bike. Neither keeps me in shape for hard road rides, but outside of doing something really concentrated in terms of effort level over a short period of time, like spinning, Iím not seeing a great answer, other than just getting on the bike and riding. An E-bike seems to be an expensive and not great answer.
    That's what I'm thinking. You want to maintain bike-specific fitness? Ride. "Off-season" training options have never been so plentiful. Fat bikes, spin classes, Zwift... It's to the point that it's easier to burn yourself out prepping for riding season than during the summer months.

    Of course, one needs to identify the personal reasons they ride, and then tailor the solution to address that. Just because ebikes make little sense to me from a recreational standpoint doesn't make it so for someone else. However, I still reserve the right to question "fitness" as a justification for their use. It's not like riding a bike is (at it's core) a strenuous form of locomotion once a certain level of basic proficiency is achieved. You can choose to make it harder (and faster), but it's still a choice you make for the most part- given modern gearing options.

    I don't recover as easily as I did when I was 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, or 45. I don't drop weight like I once did. I have to keep modifying my diet and training to achieve similar results, or deal with the decline in performance. There's always some area that I'm slacking on that's holding me back. My diet is crap. I don't get enough sleep. I don't ride hard/easy enough when I should. My socks aren't the right height... I get out what I put in. That's the deal I made. I realized long ago that I'm not elite material and there is a ceiling on what I can and can't achieve. As I get older, that ceiling of potential gets lower and lower, but if I'm 100% honest, I haven't yet come close to realizing my own potential because of my life choices. I'm fine with that, because my life is more than riding around on kids' toys in my underwear. Not a whole lot more, but there is some other stuff in there.

    Point is, based on my narrow perception of cycling and why someone would want to do it, an ebike just doesn't fit in. YMMV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Anyone riding a real road E bike ? Something like a Pinarello Nitro or Bianchi Aria Eroad or Focus Paralane,something that turn heads I mean
    If so,care to share ? I'm almost 46,busy with family an ride only 7 months per year ( including flu/cold and vacation time) during winter months,each and every year is becoming increasingly difficult to gain a decent fitness. It's not that I can't do it anymore,it's just recovery times are becoming a true issue and when I push it a bit because I feel good my body feels hammered for 2/3 days. And no,no time to stretch at the gym or whatever else..
    A couple of things I've learned in my 75 years. First, fitness has to be very high on your priority list and you need to make it high on your families. You'll be of no value to anyone when your health goes to hell. I was 70 when I began climbing most of the famous climbs in the Dolomites. I still keep cycling high enough on my priority list to suffer through the pain of the training each spring after skiing most of the winter (after 65 years, snow skiing in the resort is close to zero exercise ever when you ski hard). As you get older you will find that, with day 1 being exercise day, day three will be when the soreness shows up until you regain fitness. It will go away fairly quickly as long as you do a couple of hours three times a week.


    In regard to e-bikes: Don't be fooled by new entries into the e-bike market by manufacturers of high end road bikes. E-bikes made for the European market discontinue to provide assistance at 25kph. That does not mean that there are no European companies that make e-bikes for the US market. Make sure that the one you buy provides power assist up to 28MPH. It will make road riding much safer as you remain in the vision of overtaking cars longer and there will be fewer of them.

    I have an e-bike that was bought in early 2014 for my wife so she could join me on riding vacations in the Alps. It was from a very reputable company from Germany (Haibike) but their sizing was absurd and it was always too big for her. I now use it for making the shuttle on river fly fishing trips and it works great.

    Regarding exercise: The good news is that nearly every experienced bike rider will push themselves to get exercise that corresponds to their fitness level. An e-bike usually has four levels of assist and it will be natural to keep turning down the assist as fitness improves (highway rides notwithstanding).

  18. #18
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    HTFU. For @&^# sake, you're 46, not 86.

    My club is comprised mostly of guys in the 50s - doctors, business owners... with kids, houses... you know grownup ****. Lots of the guys still race, do fast group rides, etc. Not quite ready to blow out the candle.

    Wake up earlier. Get a Kickr. Subscribed to Zwift.. there are lots of ways to squeeze in rides.

  19. #19
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    While I have no interest in an e-bike for myself, it may have its merits if it's a difference between riding and losing interest in the sport and instead plopping your arse in front of the TV.

    As has been said, an e-bike (really e-assist) isn't a "free ride". You have to pedal it for the motor to kick in. So you do get some exercise.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    While I have no interest in an e-bike for myself, it may have its merits if it's a difference between riding and losing interest in the sport and instead plopping your arse in front of the TV.

    As has been said, an e-bike (really e-assist) isn't a "free ride". You have to pedal it for the motor to kick in. So you do get some exercise.
    I mostly agree with you but is just seems wrong to me to plunk down 6 or 7 grand to get free speed when you dont have any physical ailment. The OP doesn't say if he's riding with others but If you show up with a Pinarello ebike, there may be some judgement to contend with

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    I mostly agree with you but is just seems wrong to me to plunk down 6 or 7 grand to get free speed when you dont have any physical ailment. The OP doesn't say if he's riding with others but If you show up with a Pinarello ebike, there may be some judgement to contend with
    E-Bikes in general are not "6 or 7 grand". Well, you might be able to buy one that costs that much, but it's kind of like buying a completely blinged out top-of-the-line road bike fully decked out with the most expensive weight weenie parts for $11k.

    The BMC I bought is certainly a premium model with lightweight carbon, Shimano STEPS 8000 and Di2 shifting. The MSRP is $5999, but as far as i know, no one pays that much for them (I certainly didn't).

    You can get very serviceable commuters that are not made of premium carbon, but do have good quality electric components for $2500 or so. You can get budget models for $1500 and up.

    If you look at the companies selling E-Bikes to the masses, most of them don't even stock bikes in that price range. Of course you can go to Trek, Specialized, or BMC and spend that kind of money on a premium ride, it's not where most people are spending their money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post

    Wake up earlier. Get a Kickr. Subscribed to Zwift.. there are lots of ways to squeeze in rides.
    No.No.And no. I'm not hysterical about cycling and I don't get paid to ride.
    Last edited by Devastazione; 03-12-2019 at 07:52 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post

    As has been said, an e-bike (really e-assist) isn't a "free ride". You have to pedal it for the motor to kick in. So you do get some exercise.
    Most people don't get this,even those who test an E Bike just our of curiosity. I remember a guy who turned into the bike shop with his E bike from Trek *****ing about how the battery ran out after a little while. The douche kept the chain on the 11's all the time and set pedal assist to max power. The bike shop guy told him he shoule have got a moped...
    Last edited by Devastazione; 03-12-2019 at 07:57 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    No.No.And no. I'm not hysterichal about cycling and I don't get paid to ride.
    Then just ride what you got and quit worrying about it. Maintain a level of fitness that you can while living your life and don't worry about what you were able to maintain 10 years ago.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    E-Bikes in general are not "6 or 7 grand". Well, you might be able to buy one that costs that much, but it's kind of like buying a completely blinged out top-of-the-line road bike fully decked out with the most expensive weight weenie parts for $11k.

    The BMC I bought is certainly a premium model with lightweight carbon, Shimano STEPS 8000 and Di2 shifting. The MSRP is $5999, but as far as i know, no one pays that much for them (I certainly didn't).

    You can get very serviceable commuters that are not made of premium carbon, but do have good quality electric components for $2500 or so. You can get budget models for $1500 and up.

    If you look at the companies selling E-Bikes to the masses, most of them don't even stock bikes in that price range. Of course you can go to Trek, Specialized, or BMC and spend that kind of money on a premium ride, it's not where most people are spending their money.
    The bikes the OP listed are in that price range

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