Anyone still prefer / ride aluminium? - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    My opinion is:
    If you run a road bike with narrow tires pumped hard - the cockpit components and frame material/design do affect ride comfort. How much is components versus frame is tough to quantify.

    If your road tires are pumped less than hard, frame material is not relevant to ride quality, only your psyche and preferences.

    If you race, the stiffest frame can be the fastest. The best fitting frame+components are always most comfortable. Winning is usually a combination of the two, given equal engines and race tactics (which never happens).

    YMMV

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Last aluminum frame bike I owned was a Cannonndale 3.0 frame in the early 1990's. That bike was just brutal. I hear they'v come a long way in 30 years, but the memory of that thing keeps me away. I eventually broke it where the chain stay met the bottom bracket. That was a good day. I didn't even bother trying to warranty it for a new frame.

    All true, as regards my '90s Cannondale.
    But - on mine I remember the tires being 20 - 22mm wide and pumped to 100+psi. The under-used outdoor velodrome wasn't too far. We rode geared bikes with brakes when it was unoccupied and loved it.

    Road cycling was more brutal in populated areas in the early '90s. No bike lanes, less awareness (and acceptance). We were geek-ier back then.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    I enjoyed the heck out of my Mapei-colored Colnago Dream but, yeah, it did ride stiffly. As a matter of fact, one day Ernesto Colnago was doing a personal appearance at a nearby bike shop, and patrons were invited to bring their Colnagos and have Ernesto check them. Ernesto declared the frame too rigid and, indeed, told me to keep the tire pressures low. My wife, meantime, still rides her alu Colnago Dream all the time. As for me, yes, I did move on to carbon frames. A single, one-last-flirtation with steel-is-real steel didn't last very long.
    Man, I loved my Colnago Dream Plus. It was like riding on rails and looked great. When the headtube cracked I got a Fort RoSLC until the carbon seat stays cracked. Then I got a Spooky Skeletor (Aluminum) which I'm still riding.

    Before the Colnago, I rode a CAAD 3, which was a little too big for me.

  4. #29
    T K
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    To the OP. That Bianchi Impulso you have is a great riding bike. I have one and absolutely love it. Most comfortable bike I have owned and I have owned quite a few of all different materials. The Impulso was used in the pro peleton just a few years ago. If you go looking for greener pastures you just may be disappointed.

  5. #30
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    Yep, I ride an Al bike 7 days a week. My do-it-all bike that I commute on, ride around town, ride everywhere for errands is an inexpensive Al CX frame I built up from the frame and fork. Got a great deal on it, so have always like that part. It's not fancy, but I put quality parts on it and some 38 mm Panacracer tires and it rides nicely.

  6. #31
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    My first experience with aluminum was not good. Way too stiff after riding steel. But my CAAD 10 is a different story. Once hydroforming allowed tube shaping, alu became an option. My CAAD 10 is still my main road ride. By far, the lightest bike I own. I never realized aluminum could deteriorate over time. So far, no structural issues I can detect. I take good car of my gear. I really like the ride and find the road feedback comfortable. And Iím on 23ís at 90 psi. Iíve had this bike so long, itís now ďretroĒ!!!

  7. #32
    dcb
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    There are several things about a bike that are as, or more important than the material I think, such as the frames geometry and how it matches with you and the terrain you tend to ride on.

    Someone earlier mentioned a CAAD13. I haven't ridden the newer ones but I had a two CAAD10's that I loved but someone stole one out of my garage and I got hit by a car while riding the other one. Since then I've had three carbon bikes, one of which I liked better than the CAAD's, one not as much and one about the same.
    Last edited by dcb; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:54 PM.

  8. #33
    Pack Fodder.
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    I have one aluminum bike these days, a Storck. Hate that bike. It was an ordeal to build up and not easily maintained. Rode well enough until TSA dented the thin, hydroformed top tube, and has since been relegated to the trainer. One day the sweat will cause enough galvanic corrosion that I can feel comfortable recycling it. I certainly don't feel comfortable selling it. My issues with this bike have little to do with material and a lot to do with design.

    Back when I was foolish enough to race 'cross (great sport which I suck at), I used to prefer aluminum frames. Most of them weren't tweaked into excessively aero tube shapes, so they held up pretty well to the abuse. Internal routing wasn't a huge thing yet, and press fit bottom brackets weren't shoved down your throat.

    These days my road bikes are 50/50 carbon and ti. The carbon bikes are for racing (not that I've done much of that in the last two years) and the ti are for everything else. So, I spend a lot of time riding metal bikes. I don't worry excessively about their fatigue life, as I'll wear out long before they do.

    If you like the aluminum bike, stick with it. Ride what makes you happy. If it stops making you happy or is no longer serviceable, then consider replacing it. Don't let fashion dictate your ride.

  9. #34
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    Your bike is beautiful! Keep it! I would install a carbon seatpost and handlebars.

  10. #35
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    The short of it is different materials behave differently regardless of what people say, but the differences are not as big a deal as some people make them out to be. I know a guy in Cali that puts thousands of miles with all kinds of climbing on an aluminum Specialized Allez Sprint. I know a woman that does the same with a Cannondale in London. Both are very serious cyclists that are happy on aluminum bikes. Others, like myself, prefer carbon bikes for a variety of reasons.

    Despite Covid-19, I say do a test ride (or a number of them) if you can and donít sell the bike you have and like until you find something you know you like riding more. Thatís really the key. Everything else is just distractions, etc.

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