Beer Clipless and beer ride... No epiphany
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  1. #1
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    Beer Clipless and beer ride... No epiphany

    I just came back for my beer (first) ride with my beer (first) pair of clipless. It was a short ride about 10 miles with pretty much the entire way out all I was doing was clipping and unclipping, On the way back I just rode as I normally would.

    I think I may have gone 1 or 2 miles faster than usual, or it could be that I haven't ridden in a several days or that I took it easy on the way out and was not tired for my ride back.
    I did feel my feet pulling on the pedals a couple of times, which I guess is nice.

    The thing is I didn't have the epiphany I was expecting. The moment that everything was clear and I questioned how could I have gone so long without clipless. It was nice, but I don't know if it was $160 dollars worth and an "inpending tip-over "

    What am I missing? Is it continued use or long distances, or whatever, that is going to tell me the difference?


    Beer? For a cross-cultural education: In the Skydiving world, whenever someone does something for the "first" time it is their "Beer" time - You never say "first" and always replace it with "beer"

    Why you may ask. Because whenever you do something for the Beer (first) time, YOU buy a case of beer for the dropzone.

    Still perplexed: How to entice both experience and new jumpers to stick around after the planes have stopped --- Free BEER!!
    With free Beer, there will be plenty of people much more experienced than your talking about what YOU did. What to do better, what never to do again, how that could have killed you, etc.... The Best learning comes after the planes have stopped.
    Also a great way to meet people

  2. #2
    Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
    Reputation: jupiterrn's Avatar
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    As you get use to the pedals you will notice that you will have more control and a smoother pedaling cadence and more power to the pedal. Smoothness is next to godliness as far a pedaling. Now go by use a case of beer. Something nice too none of that cheap stuff.
    Just fast enough to know I am slow.

  3. #3
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    try this, unclip one leg (and extend it out to the side or back) and pedal one legged focusing on the upward stroke and downward stroke. be sure to pedal "circles" not "squares" a drill like this is good at realizing how our pedal stroke mechanics are deficient...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jupiterrn
    Now go by use a case of beer. Something nice too none of that cheap stuff.
    Haha, always good beer, and most likely in a green bottle

  5. #5
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    I don't know anybody who regularly pulls up on the pedals. To apply power, besides pushing down, which is natural, when you get to the bottom of the pedal stroke, pull back. It's similar to the motion you'd make if you were trying to wipe mud off your shoes before you went in the house. You'll also be able to spin the pedals faster, assuming that you want to. The pedals will keep your feet firmly planted on the pedals in exactly the position you need for maximum power and efficiency. You'll come to appreciate them in short order.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  6. #6
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    it really doesnt make that big of a difference. its a marginal difference, but hey why not. a gain is a gain.

    i use spd pedals and cant imagine not being able to clip out on the road. ive been goofing off and fallen over playing on the bike while everyone is stopped, but no big deal. you might slip on a platform and do the same thing.

    all in all, its not a big deal.. if you really dont like it, dont fret going back to platforms for a while.

  7. #7
    Two wheels=freedom!
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    A few years ago, I introduced a family to road cycling. Oh sure, they had ridden bikes, and had the ubiquitous pile of rusty mountain bikes leaning against the garage, but they were intrigued by my keen interest in the sport. They were all very athletic, a mother and three teenage daughters. Deciding to take the plunge, I went with them to a good LBS (Zane's in Branford, CT... shameless plug) and they all bought road bikes. On our first ride together, they constantly asked me why I was always pedaling so fast. I explained "Spinning" and they all wanted to try to do it. They were all frightened by the concept of attaching their feet to the pedals at the bike shop, so each had opted for platform pedals. But when they tried to spin, at anything over 70 rpm they had a hard time keeping their feet on the pedals. The next day, back to the LBS, and they all got shoes and Keo's. Once clipped in, they all were amazed at the ease with which they could spin up to 80 - 90 rpm or more..

    For spinning, it is impossible to be efficient on platform pedals. You must put some pressure on your upward stroke to maintain contact with the pedal, which is counter to the power stroke of the other pedal. Simple math: 100% power minus 5% counter equals only 95% efficiency. Once you no longer have to worry about keeping the up-stroking foot in contact with the pedal, you can gain back that 5% loss.

    If you are mashing (under 60 rpm) all the time, platforms are fine. But once you get into a high cadence, being attached either through clips and straps or clipless, is mandatory.

    The spin at high cadence is where your "epiphany" will occur.
    Last edited by rdolson; 05-30-2009 at 05:52 AM.

  8. #8
    Hucken The Fard Up !
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    If you ride a normal flat ride at a soft-medium pace, you won't have much an "epiphany".

    Now try to sprint hyper-strong on normal pedals, you'll have your first epiphany when you are on the clipless.

    Now go and climb and steep hill, go on the hanlebars ( on "danseuse" ) and push the pedals real hard to beat that hill into sumbission. first on standard pedals, then on your clipless. Then you'll have the bigest epiphany of them all

    If your clipless are SPD pedals, try one day the SPD-SL or Look Keos etc, you'll have an even greater "epiphany",

  9. #9
    Domokun!
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    ok, ok i'll say it... I'm waiting for the "beer" fall! It'll happen when you least expect it. At a light, in the driveway, who knows but the "beer fall" has you in it's sights.

    BTW It always happens when there's a bunch of people around. It's humbling but it'll happen...

    My wife rode toe clips for over 10yrs and made the switch to clipless. I LOL'd when it happened after she told me I was crazy...
    " The ability to purchase an expensive bicycle does not make you a cyclist! "

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolFatGuy
    ok, ok i'll say it... I'm waiting for the "beer" fall! It'll happen when you least expect it. At a light, in the driveway, who knows but the "beer fall" has you in it's sights.
    No way, I gotz mad SKILLZ Maybe, if I keep telling myself that ....

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