Big Move South... and I'm feeling the Heat.
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  1. #1
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    Big Move South... and I'm feeling the Heat.

    Moved from Maine to Florida, just north of the Tampa area early this Summer to satisfy family pressures. Pretty much settled in, but I'm really struggling with the heat and humidity. Acclimating slowly and steadily riding early morning or late evenings when the thunderstorms aren't around. Staying well hydrated, too.

    My norm by this time of year would be 120 to 190 miles a week, doing rides between 35 to 75 miles. Rides lengths here are just 25 to 30 miles so far, even on the super flat Florida roads and trails totaling only around 100 miles +/- a week. Where I'd get 1,100 to 2,300 feet elevation per ride, I'm lucky to see 120-150 feet here. It's flat as a pancake. Definitely a big change and hope to increase my mileage soon.

    The thing that I've noticed the most is developing hot spots in my Specialized road shoes on the balls of my feet. My guess is that it's heat related, since I've never encountered this while riding longer distances in Maine.

    So I'm open to opinions and suggestions on road shoes that ventilate really well or any other related solutions.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  2. #2
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    I moved from the Midwest to southern Arizona a while back....certainly FAR less humid here than Florida, but the summer heat is miserable. It took years for me to get used to it, but even 25 years later I still don't like the intense heat, like when it's 110 degrees and above.

    I ran into similar problems with hot spots on my feet while riding and after some trial and error realized I had the velcro straps too tight. I loosened the straps up a bit and it pretty much eliminated the hot spots. You might want to give it a try.

    And remember that you can ride year-round in Florida, so you'll be getting the miles in during the middle of winter when your friends in Maine are freezing their kiesters off!

  3. #3
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    More likely the hot spots may be caused because you are constantly having to maintain a steady pressure on the pedals to keep moving. You don't get to coast and you don't have many chances to stand and pedal either. I live south of Houston with a similar climate and terrain to what you have. Mesh shoes may help, along with thin socks and holes punched in the insoles to facilitate airflow. I wear Sidi Wire shoes with thin Defeet socks

  4. #4
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    I've lived in FL my entire life......and now live just South of Tampa Bay (I see the Skyway on my Saturday AM Rides). Feels Like is 104 right now and I'll be on the road in about 45 minutes. I've worn Sidi shoes the last 15 years and never have hot spot issues.
    Currently Ergo 3 and Wire. I have slim feet and some of my Sidis have a Dr. Scholl's gel insert. Good socks help too.....
    Good Luck and welcome to FL.
    Last edited by cdhbrad; 08-09-2019 at 07:55 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by azpeterb View Post
    And remember that you can ride year-round in Florida, so you'll be getting the miles in during the middle of winter when your friends in Maine are freezing their kiesters off!
    They can do these instead, which they have many I've heard.






  6. #6
    wots...uh the deal?
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    In the heat, my feet can swell a bit. That might account for different pressures or shoe fit. Something to consider

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmoose View Post
    In the heat, my feet can swell a bit. That might account for different pressures or shoe fit. Something to consider
    yes definitely a strong chance that's it. Try not tightening your shoes as much, thinner socks or thinner inserts.

  8. #8
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    yes definitely a strong chance that's it. Try not tightening your shoes as much, thinner socks or thinner inserts.
    Pretty much what I would say as well. Try different inserts. Riding in flat coastal areas is something to get used to. I do a century near the beach every year, and also spend a week there riding my bike. I think the big thing to get used to when riding on flat terrain is how easy it is not to change your position. My hands and back get sore a lot quicker than when there's some hills to break things up.

  9. #9
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    big move south ... and i'm feeling the heat

    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  10. #10
    hfc
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    I was reflecting on that just yesterday. Summers in the southeast are just miserable now. Heat and humidity settle in about early to mid May and last until early October. Iím lucky in that I have the Blue Ridge mountains at my doorstep so Iíll load the bike in the car and drive up there to get a 10 or so degree temp drop but even so it can still be pretty toasty.

    Iíll do routes to come back by my house or car to reload on cold water for longer rides (pack a cooler) and make sure you get electrolytes to avoid cramping.

  11. #11
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    Riding your bike in Florida summers is like riding your bike in Maine winters. Miles are a bonus. Donít sweat the shorter rides (see what I did there?) youíll get miles in the cooler months. Just reverse your riding season mindset. I canít imagine how hard that transition is, itís SO dramatic! And goodbye climbing... Good luck and good riding!
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  12. #12
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    Be satisfied to do a third of normal mileage. A climb is one thing, but the humidity is entirely another thing.

    October 29, 2000. Minnesota Vikings are 7-0, and head to Tampa Bay to play the Bucs, who are 3-4.

    On whom do you place your bet?

    I was on my way back from 3 day ultimate frisbee nationals, so pretty tired out myself, but being from the Gulf Coast, I am still conscious. Driving back home after getting eliminated (9th place out of 12 teams in masters div), we take a break to check out Vikings-Bucs.

    We watch the Vikings melt. Final score: Bucs win 41-13.

    Time in the saddle. After a year, get your cycling friends to come visit. And laugh as they melt.

    I left the Gulf Coast this summer for a week in Colorado at about 8500 feet. My two hilly rides had about 600 ft gain. It killed me. I cried Uncle. At least I averaged 9mph.
    Last edited by PJay; 08-13-2019 at 03:02 PM. Reason: Vikings mlt not Bucs

  13. #13
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    I hate riding in the hot humid weather and when it's above 90* it's hard for me and I've had several incidents with heat exhaustion, so a bit gun shy. But, I like riding in the colder months. I joke that my riding temp is 25* to 89*.

  14. #14
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    I like the heat/humidity b/c it represents the 3 months a year Iím stronger than my main cycling buddy. He can ride me down the other 9 months, but wilts in the high heat & humidity.

  15. #15
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    Best to just move back north I think. I can't ride much over 80F. But I do like it in the southwest desert .. in winter only. Each to their own though. I see the Arizonans come north here in the summer and I know who they are cause they are wearing long sleeve coats and balaclavas on their bikes when it is 70F here! seriously, like a different species
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

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