Bike mounted to trainer, or stationary bike cycling trainer?
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  1. #1
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    Bike mounted to trainer, or stationary bike cycling trainer?

    Winter weather is coming...

    Wondering what the thoughts are on either using my road bike mounted to a trainer (not interested in roller v. trainer debate), or using a standalone stationary bike...This will be the first winter training I do, and I'm planning on riding outside when possible, but I need a fallback for 'can't ride' days. I'm looking for some benefit/detriment analysis on both sides, from people who have tried both.

  2. #2
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    I'd choose my road bike over a stationary bike. By using your usual bike you keep the same position that you're used to. You don't have to adapt to a new position twice per year. You also have the same gears, same shifters, same bars, use the same shoes, same seat, etc.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  3. #3
    wim
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    Agree completely with Mr. Versatile. But if you're looking for a compromise, consider a dumpster bike mounted to your trainer. If the saddle-pedal-handlebar points in space are identical to your fancy road bike, there's no reason why you can't train on junk. I did some of my best winter training on an AMF "Roadmaster" found in a ditch and subsequently mounted onto my Blackburn wind trainer.

  4. #4
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    everyone here will say get a trainer for YOUR BIKE.

  5. #5
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by skyliner1004
    everyone here will say get a trainer for YOUR BIKE.
    Are you sure? The dude who wrote post # 3 recommended a dumpster bike. And many of those who say get a trainer for YOUR BIKE will only do so because they've never trained on a standalone stationary bike.

  6. #6
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    i prefer the regular road bike with a dedicated trainer wheel/tire for easy swaps.

  7. #7
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    I say trainer, for the same reasons listed above.
    Last edited by jaysc; 09-19-2010 at 11:56 PM.

  8. #8
    wim
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    Confused?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaysc
    Do you have anything to contribute to this thread?.
    I already contributed to this thread in posts # 3 and # 5. If you don't like what I contributed, say so and explain why you don't like it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    I already contributed to this thread in posts # 3 and # 5. If you don't like what I contributed, say so and explain why you don't like it.
    Sincerest apologies. I failed to read the user names of all posters and did not realize that you were also poster number three. Post number five makes more sense now. I guess I was more tired than I realized.

    Post edited!

  10. #10
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaysc
    did not realize that you were also poster number three.
    Part of this was my fault. Trying to be witty, I referred to myself in the third person ("the dude who wrote..."), which is, in fact, confusing.

  11. #11
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    I tried 2 different stationary bikes and both of them were worse than riding my bike on the trainer, which is bad enough but I will do it.

    I vote trainer.
    "Science has proven that if you have one flat on your bike, you will have another one, sooner or later. This is the reason that you should always buy a new bike when you get a flat." Mr Grumpy

  12. #12
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    Price, portability, identical fit and controls of what you're actually training for, ease of storage, realistic gear changing ......I really can't think of anything in favor of a stationary bike other than it won't put any wear on your bike. Even then it might still be cheaper to get a second bike and a trainer.
    There are cheap stationary bikes out there off course......but as far as I know if you want realistic gear change and resistance change it will cost a mint on a stationary bike. I doubt anyone would ever burn enough tires to make up the difference. But considering you just use tires that are no longer road safe but not dead either....it's a moot point anyway.

  13. #13
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    Stationary bike in a spin class....

    While I have a trainer for my bike, I just don't have to motivation to get any real benefit out of it...

    When I can't ride outdoors, I head to the local 24 Hr Fitness and take a spin class...I have 3 locations within an easy drive so there is always a class regardless of the day of week.... For me, I get a much better workout....your mileage may vary
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

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  14. #14
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    Is it essential to have a dedicated trainer wheel and tire? What's the thought behind doing that instead of just using your regular wheel/tire?

  15. #15
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    Road bike all the way. You wont have to worry about fit and will be able to ride your own bike. Plus, in my experience stationary bikes usually --- well, suck (quality wise.)
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  16. #16
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    There are so many benefits to having YOUR bike in a trainer as stated in the previous post and I have a trainer as well. BUT, there are other household benefits to having an indoor cycle. We just purchased a barely used LeMond RevMaster Pro.

    Here is our rationalization:
    1. outside bike stays outside (no having to clean it before it comes indoors)
    2. indoor cycles are practically silent (good for family considerations if you share space)
    3. wifey likes to use the indoor cycle so changing positions is fast and easy for all.
    4. it takes up a lot less room in the 'exercise corner' of our den

    Is the same set up as your road bike - absolutely not - but items 1-4 won out in our household YMMV.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawfarm
    Is it essential to have a dedicated trainer wheel and tire? What's the thought behind doing that instead of just using your regular wheel/tire?

    Trainers tend to eat tires from what I hear. My guess is many people just buy a seperate cheap wheel/tire combo to swap on so they don't eat through good tires they use during the season. Check out www.sportsauthority.com if you're looking at the Kurt Kinetic Road Machine. I just picked one up and found a 20% off coupon code online. Got it for 255+shipping. I think like 275-280$ total.

  18. #18
    n00bsauce
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
    Stationary bike in a spin class....

    While I have a trainer for my bike, I just don't have to motivation to get any real benefit out of it...

    When I can't ride outdoors, I head to the local 24 Hr Fitness and take a spin class...I have 3 locations within an easy drive so there is always a class regardless of the day of week.... For me, I get a much better workout....your mileage may vary
    +1 for the spin bike and spin class. I've done it both ways. Probably spent 10 years on various trainers and 8 years spinning. Spinning is better in almost every way IMHO, especially if you have a good instructor. Spin bikes adjust well and you can easily get a position that's very close to your regular bike position. The big advantage is the workout. You just can't get as good a workout by yourself. A good instructor and a good class is a much better motivator.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

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  19. #19
    duh...
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    budget? "stationary bikes" are often crap, but a decent spin bike can replicate your position. it will cost you tho. if you ride occasionally or semi-regularly in winter, putting the bike (if you only have one) on and off and on again (and cleaning in between if needed) can be bit of a pita. whatever you get, keep in mind that many people would rather hang by their testicles than ride a trainer for more than 10min
    .


    Quote Originally Posted by mikagsd
    Fat tire Fred....you are the bike god of the universe and unless someone agrees with your reasoning they are just plain stupid

  20. #20
    n00bsauce
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    What I get a kick out of is that somehow the experience of riding a wind trainer or a spin bike is even close to a real riding experience. No matter how hard we try, it will never approximate a real ride. Wind trainers of all stripes, rollers, spin bikes, stationary bikes, nothing will come close. So, the way I see it, what's important is motivation, intensity (all types of intensity from LSD, to recovery, to intervals, etc.) and tolerability (maybe even fun?). Spin class comes the closest IMHO. Now, YMMV. That's what's great about having choices.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

    "We are all ignorant about most things."
    Mel Erickson

  21. #21
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Erickson
    What I get a kick out of is that somehow the experience of riding a wind trainer or a spin bike is even close to a real riding experience. No matter how hard we try, it will never approximate a real ride. Wind trainers of all stripes, rollers, spin bikes, stationary bikes, nothing will come close. So, the way I see it, what's important is motivation, intensity (all types of intensity from LSD, to recovery, to intervals, etc.) and tolerability (maybe even fun?). Spin class comes the closest IMHO. Now, YMMV. That's what's great about having choices.

    Well said Mel....That is exactly my experience as well.....

    I come closer to maintaining my fitness in spin class because I am more motivated....Nothing comes close to riding outdoors so pick the lesser of the evils...
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  22. #22
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    The awesome thing about trainers is that you can unhook them and hook them back up in all of 30 seconds, I don't see why you can't ride your bike outside AND on the trainer
    "It's hard to tell the poison from the cure, so enjoy the disease."
    -Mohair_Chair

  23. #23
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    If you keep riding, eventually you will have several bikes, and as the older ones get replaced, choose one of these "old" bikes as your dedicated trainer bike. Get a dedicated set of trainer wheels and use old worn out tires for the trainer.

    No reason to spend thousands on a spin bike, when you can just use one of your old road bikes. If you are at all serious about cycling, you'll eventually get a second, third, etc. road bike.

  24. #24
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    People are right on the motivation factor. But, go out, get a Cycleops trainer (model that increases intensity as you shift, don't buy one with a manual intensity adjuster), get a bunch of Spinervals or Chris Carmichael DVDs and you'll find yourself sweating and working like a maniac if you follow them precisely. Coach Troy/Spinervals also does DVDs that are actual footage of the ride. You "follow" another bike through the roads. Mt. Lemmon outside of Tuscon for example is a great one. Follow the shifting and intensity guide and you'll be wiped out after an hour. I've spent many years doing spin classes, and after getting a bunch of the DVDs I'm now riding about 10-20% of the time in spin classes and the rest on the trainer during the winter. I'll admit, it does help a little that my wife rides right next to me on her trainer at home, but for the most part we just ignore each other.
    “To kill, you must know your enemy, and in this case my enemy is a varmint. And a varmint will never quit — ever. They’re like the Viet Cong — Varmint Cong. So you have to fall back on superior intelligence and superior firepower.”

  25. #25
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    Motivation (too keep intensity up) seems to be the hardest thing to maintain indoors. Another problem is that once I get off the bike I don't want to get back on. In both of these cases a spin class is best, but it's only 1hr at a time usually.

    For at home something you have to take into account is the "feel", I have a stationary bike and a trainer. The trainer has a little bit better feel because I think the flywheel simulates the road nicely. The flywheel on my stationary bike and most spin type bikes is very large which has + and - but doesn't simulate the road great. A stationary bike is going to be waaaaay more stable than a trainer which I like a lot. In the end I feel like I can spend more time on a stationary bike, but I can put longer bouts of intensity on a trainer.

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