bike problems with under a month till first race
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  1. #1

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    Unhappy bike problems with under a month till first race

    Hey all,

    this is my first post in a while, work has been pretty hectic here at school but there is a light at the end of the tunnel : our first series of weekend races start in march!

    now for the bad news, i cracked my carbon fork on a guardrail, I escaped with a bruised shoulder and ego. its definately not rideable.

    Considering the fact that i have VERY limited funds, its going to take me at least 2 weeks to get a replacement. Thats a critical loss of time in the few weeks leading up to a race. Is there any way that hard cross distance running can help me simulate the stress of cycling and keep my cardiovascular fitness at its current level? Im talking 5-10 miles a day of hard rolling hills. I know bike specific stuff is the best way but thats just not an option for the next few weeks. Im just looking for damage control here.

    ALL suggestions welcome and appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Check out www.chucksbikes.com

    There are several forks for cheap. They might not be Look or Time, but they are pretty good. I bought one for $65 and it rides better than the stock Time my C-dale came with.

    Or, you can always buy a steel fork from nashbar and then just save money for a real carbon fork.

  3. #3

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    To answer your question- I ran last winter every time it snowed which was quite often. I would run on hilly roads for at least 6 miles. I also went to a park and ran on rugged trails up long flights of stairs and up steep hills. I could feel that I lost some on the bike performance mainly at the "high" end of my power but I didn't lose any of my fitness so I was able to bounce back very quickly. I think it took about 2-3 rides to be back where I was before I started running.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max-Q
    To answer your question- I ran last winter every time it snowed which was quite often. I would run on hilly roads for at least 6 miles. I also went to a park and ran on rugged trails up long flights of stairs and up steep hills. I could feel that I lost some on the bike performance mainly at the "high" end of my power but I didn't lose any of my fitness so I was able to bounce back very quickly. I think it took about 2-3 rides to be back where I was before I started running.

    that good to hear. im not too worried about losing my high end output as i was never much of a sprinter to begin with and at my peak i couldnt maintain more than 24mph for more than a couple of minutes so im not going to dominate the peleton if you know what i mean. i just want to be competitive. thanks a lot bro.

  5. #5
    Gruntled
    Reputation: Jim Nazium's Avatar
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    Running hills (or stairs) will definitely keep your cardio fitness up there. Also keep in mind that while your first race may be in early March, the season runs clear through April, and as I recall collegiate championhsips are in late May, right? You don't want to peak too early and then burn out. This could turn oout to be a blessing in disguise.

  6. #6
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    If you are serious about racing you need to have at least two bikes and two sets of road wheels. Neither needs to be super high end or anything, and the second bike could be a cross bike or even a mtb, but if you ride a lot stuff is gonna break and if you don't want to mess up your training schedule you're gonna need a backup. For the time being isn't there a bike you can borrow? Check with your club or team or friends or LBS. Borrow your girlfriend's mountain bike. Whatever it takes.

  7. #7
    Old, slow, and fat.
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    I'll vouch for this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Chinaski
    If you are serious about racing you need to have at least two bikes and two sets of road wheels. Neither needs to be super high end or anything, and the second bike could be a cross bike or even a mtb, but if you ride a lot stuff is gonna break and if you don't want to mess up your training schedule you're gonna need a backup. For the time being isn't there a bike you can borrow? Check with your club or team or friends or LBS. Borrow your girlfriend's mountain bike. Whatever it takes.
    I've got two road bikes, a cross bike, a mtn bike and a track bike. The only thing I really don't have a backup for is the track bike and I was going to buy one right before my friend Troy got me building a reef aquarium.

    Multiple sets of wheels are another must. At least two sets of training wheels and one pair of race wheels is min. in my book. That way, if you crash on a Sat race and you still have a Sun race to go, you're not S.O.L.

    Mike

  8. #8
    Roll Out Jeremy
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    Please

    be careful of your knees. Your joints aren't used to running. I'd hate to see you do any physical damage in the interest of staying in shape for cycling. Don't run hard down hill or down stairs. Can you go swimming? I don't mean to sound negative towards running. Just be careful.

  9. #9

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    i'll third that

    If you race, you should really have two bikes, and even if you don't it's a great idea. I've got a race bike, training bike, and a tt bike, with four sets of wheels between the bunch. Now, I'm not saying you have to go this overkill, but lets put it this way, I've always got a bike, even if some turkey in a collegiate b or c's race decides he gets to take all the lines. Collegiate racing (where I'm from) is three races a weekend (crit, rr, ttt usually) and if you don't show up with at least two wheels sets, you're testing your luck.

  10. #10
    flinty-eyed moderator
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    I second the watch the kneee caution. Your motor is in good shape, and you may be tempted to pound out the extra miles more then your knees are ready for. Try for soft surfaces like grass and dirt paths.

    Also an inexpensive Al fork is almost as light as many CF forks and much cheaper.
    Dr. Cox: Lady, people aren't chocolates. Do you know what they are mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard fillings. But I don't find them half as annoying as I find naive bubble-headed optimists who walk around vomiting sunshine.

  11. #11
    Endorphin Junkie
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    Watch your feet, too

    Cycling shoes are pretty rigid and support the foot. You're not getting much flexing of the foot when you ride. Suddenly jumping to running can cause damage to unprepared connective tissue. When I was in college, at the end of one race season, I started running. Aerobically, I could handle 5 miles right off the bat with no problem. Did that about two times and woke up one morning almost unable to walk. I had plantar facitis (sp?), which is an inflamation of the plantar facia, the tendon (or ligament, I forget) that runs from the heel out toward the toes on the bottom of the foot. Start out slow.

    As for your fork, try www.chucksbikes.com. He often has decent forks cheap. I've bought a few things there and never been disappointed.

    Glad to hear your brush with the guardrail didn't cause more damage. Heal up and good luck!

    Kathy

    Kathy
    "Riding the wheel, our powers are revealed to us..." Maria Ward, Bicycling for Ladies, 1896

  12. #12
    hi, I'm Larry
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    Go get a beater at Goodwill

    sort of joking but you might be able to find a ridable road bike that fits there. Good enough for training and getting the muscles in condition. Just move your pedals over, Clean up the brake and shifter cables and get a new low end Chain and you have a trainer for 50 bucks.

    Check garage sales and pawn shops. I've bought an old TREK 400 at a garage sale for $30 and a Giant Prodogy Cross bike at a garage sale for $50. Both were nice bikes, in good condition. The Prodogy is my current winter bike. If it rusts or gets worn out by the sand and salt, no big deal, I'll throw it away and find another beater for next winter.

    See if someone on your team has a beater to lend. (It would be a lot to ask to have them lend you a high end bike)

    Having been a poor college student long ago, I know a stable of bikes for racing is out of the question. There are priorities to think of, beer and parties or bikes. Find a way to do both. During the season, if you toast your bike or wheels, throw yourself on the mercy of your team. If you are good and they need and want you, I'm sure they will come up with something until you get your bike repaired.

  13. #13
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    How About The Gym at School?

    Do they have a stationary bike?

    Also, how about a turbo/mag trainer hooked up to the back wheel of your bike? Yes, the fork may be hosed, but maybe you can still use your bike safely to do stationary workouts. Just stay seated, and don't rock the bike...

    Just a thought.
    It's Been Fun...See You Down The Road.

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