BRIFTER-and other lame cycling terms - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    Nope. "Brifter" is a coined word. A compound word is an established combined word. Think "daybreak" or "tombstone" - two words in their entirety combined into a single word. "Website" is an example of a combined term that's since been adopted... it's now a compound word.
    ....
    From a linguistic standpoint, that is one of the defining features of Germanic languages. For anybody who is fluent in modern German, there are countless examples of combined words that are an amalgam of 4 or 5 separate words, even. Some are rather long.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  2. #27
    Slowski
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    Bidon - I get it, it's French , but it does sound like a word for a baby bottle.

  3. #28
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    23c, 25c, 28c, etc. etc. etc.

    The wheel is 700[c, the tires are mm's.
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #29
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    23c, 25c, 28c, etc. etc. etc.

    The wheel is 700[c, the tires are mm's.
    ^This^
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    From a linguistic standpoint, that is one of the defining features of Germanic languages. For anybody who is fluent in modern German, there are countless examples of combined words that are an amalgam of 4 or 5 separate words, even. Some are rather long.
    But more common is the evolution of the named thing with no evolution of the name. When we started using the word "phone" (after dropping "tele-", it had one function. We've added functions - first a few (recording, autodialing) then millions (apps) and still, we call it a phone.

    Of course both arguments are correct... I just don't like the word "brifter" ;-)

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    From a linguistic standpoint, that is one of the defining features of Germanic languages. For anybody who is fluent in modern German, there are countless examples of combined words that are an amalgam of 4 or 5 separate words, even. Some are rather long.
    What comes to me with my crude knowledge of Deutsch is typewriter = Schriebmaschine, or literally 'writing machine'. I suppose 'typewriter' is just as much crudely thrown together, or neologistic I suppose.

    Best one from the link below is #9 - Fingerspitengefuhl, or 'finger feeling'. (The u should have an umlaut)

    https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/t...w-to-use-them/

    NTT, got any mega-multi-syllabic-germanic combined words you can share?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogre View Post
    .......
    NTT, got any mega-multi-syllabic-germanic combined words you can share?
    Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  8. #33
    Never Give Up!
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I don't study words, I just have opinions. You old enough to every have a work provided pager? And end up running around looking for a pay phone when you boss messaged '911'?
    Lol... I do! I use to manage them for a team of software engineers and cryptographers
    "I refuse to be afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday & I love today!!"

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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    How about a system of pedal interface where you clip in, called clipless?
    ...
    Good example; it made sense 40+ years ago, but hardly anybody still uses toe clips today. Should call them "cleat pedals" or even "click-in pedals".
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Then your standards for "stupid", need adjusted.

    "Brifter" is a compound word that tells you what you're talking about, and saves time talking/typing in doing so. As such it is automatically superior to "bottom bracket" that is not only wordy--but fails spectacularly at clarifying exactly what the item in question is (it is neither at the bottom nor are there any brackets involved).
    Thats it! The support for the crank bearings is bracketed between the bottom of the downtube and seatpost, hence "bottom bracket." 19th Century lingo.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    How about a system of pedal interface where you clip in, called clipless?
    Using inches to measure wheel diameters and millimeters for crank lengths.

    brifter worked really well but they are so ubiquitous now brake lever usually means brifter
    Fugly is a great adjective which works really well, it's a neologism. That's for you Mapei
    I heard the Japanese and British introduced 27" tires. Millimeters would be small enough to accurately measure smaller differences in crank lengths. And yeah, clip in to clipless pedals doesn't make an ounce of sense.

    Original users were referring to toe clips and straps. Riders just jammed their feet down on those Look pedals, no toe clip to navigate, no strap to pull--clipless!

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    23c, 25c, 28c, etc. etc. etc.

    The wheel is 700[c, the tires are mm's.
    Well, some of us thought of "C," albeit abstractly, as "circumference." The height and width of the tire would deform depending on tread and rim width.

    What's the functional difference between a 25mm tire and a "26mm" tire? Who knows? Same height but slightly wider? On my bikes, the "25mm" Conti measures 23mm width and 25mm height from the rim. The "28mm" Gatorskin measures 27mm width and 25mm height.

    I've measured other tires on rims and found these numbers 25mm, 28mm aren't always the actual width or height of the tire. But they do identify girth, circumference bead to bead, and give you an idea of how they'll ride.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 07-17-2019 at 12:39 AM.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Well, some of us thought of "C," albeit abstractly, as "circumference." The height and width of the tire would deform depending on tread and rim width.

    What's the functional difference between a 25mm tire and a "26mm" tire? Who knows? Same height but slightly wider? On my bikes, the "25mm" Conti measures 23mm width and 25mm height from the rim. The "28mm" Gatorskin measures 27mm width and 25mm height.

    I've measured other tires on rims and found these numbers 25mm, 28mm aren't always the actual width or height of the tire. But they do identify girth, circumference bead to bead, and give you an idea of how they'll ride.
    In the French sizing system, tires are designated by a three-digit number, which may be followed by a letter. The number is the nominal outside diameter of the tire the rim was originally designed for. The absence of a letter indicated a narrow tire; "A", "B" and "C" indicated increasingly wider tires."A" was originally a tire about 30 mm wide, so the 650A rim is pretty large, 590 mm. If you add the top and bottom 30 mm tire thickness to 590, you wind up with the 650 mm tire diameter.

    The 650C size was originally intended for a quite wide tire, about 40 mm wide. Top and bottom 40 mm tire plus the 571 mm rim size again bring you to a 650 mm outside diameter, even though the rim was smaller.

    With time, however, evolutionary processes have led to different widths of tires being applied to the rim, so the nominal 650 mm designation is now more theoretical than practical.


    from
    https://sheldonbrown.com/650b.html

    As can be seen reading this, the number\letter designation(700c, 650a, 650b etc) represents the dimension of the diameter of the wheel with the tire mounted on the rim. The "c" of a 700c wheel has nothing to do with the tire alone.

    Originally smaller rims were made for larger diameter tires to keep the same wheel height across the board, hence the A, B, C designations.
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I don't study words, I just have opinions. You old enough to every have a work provided pager? And end up running around looking for a pay phone when you boss messaged '911'?
    Or do like Homer:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TINdNEMhga4
    Last edited by Lombard; 07-17-2019 at 05:06 AM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    23c, 25c, 28c, etc. etc. etc.

    The wheel is 700[c, the tires are mm's.
    No, the wheel is 622.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Slow day at the Russian Troll Farm?
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to SPlKE again.


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  17. #42
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    You know what I think is really lame? The term HTFU.....even though I struggle to resist using it with some people on these forums.

    It's usually just a chest bumping, boner wagging display of faux manliness. You are better off just burping, farting and grunting.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #43
    What the what???
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    You are better off just burping, farting and grunting.
    You mean burfarunting, right?


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    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy you better leave something in the tank for the turn...

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    You mean burfarunting, right?
    Exactly!

    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Opus51569 again.


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    No, the wheel is 622.
    Right, but the tire mounted on the rim is 700, as noted in my post from earlier today. The original 700c measurement comes from the tire\rim combination which necessitated a tire of a certain width measured in mm's.

    I should have written the tire mounted on the rim constitutes the wheel, which is700c.
    Too old to ride plastic

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Right, but the tire mounted on the rim is 700, as noted in my post from earlier today. The original 700c measurement comes from the tire\rim combination which necessitated a tire of a certain width measured in mm's.

    I should have written the tire mounted on the rim constitutes the wheel, which is700c.
    700c is nothing more than an arbitrary designation. As you said, for this to be a true measurement, it would be required to be a specific width. But we all know that all widths of road tires mountable to 622mm rims are designated 700c, while all widths of mountain tires mountable to 622mm rims are designated 29.

    Bike tire sizing systems are more of a cluster f*ck than car tire sizing systems.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    700c is nothing more than an arbitrary designation. As you said, for this to be a true measurement, it would be required to be a specific width. But we all know that all widths of road tires mountable to 622mm rims are designated 700c, while all widths of mountain tires mountable to 622mm rims are designated 29.

    Bike tire sizing systems are more of a cluster f*ck than car tire sizing systems.
    It's not arbitrary, but it's true worth is lost in the annals of time. At one time there was a 700c tire a 650b tire a 650a tire, but there was never a 25c tire.
    Too old to ride plastic

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    It's not arbitrary, but it's true worth is lost in the annals of time. At one time there was a 700c tire a 650b tire a 650a tire, but there was never a 25c tire.
    The Continental Ultra 2000 tires I have are printed on the sidewall, "700 x 25C." They're about 5 years old. The Gatorskins are marked "700 x 28C." WTF?

    Which leads to the question: is the size designation 25C or mm, 28C or mm, a measure of height or width?

    My measurements above seem to indicate height, and of course width would vary according to height, but not necessarily as much, depending on casing and rim width. Larger clincher road tires generally seem to be elongated in height but not equally in width. Tubular tires would stay round in height and width.

    Also, 650B et. al. are followed by another number referring to tire size. It will be larger than 25 or 28 mm, although the total diameter of the wheel with tire mounted would be the same or very close.

    IOW, I find the new insistence on millimeters just as misleading or possibly more so than the old C designations.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    The Continental Ultra 2000 tires I have are printed on the sidewall, "700 x 25C." They're about 5 years old. The Gatorskins are marked "700 x 28C." WTF?

    Which leads to the question: is the size designation 25C or mm, 28C or mm, a measure of height or width?

    My measurements above seem to indicate height, and of course width would vary according to height, but not necessarily as much, depending on casing and rim width. Larger clincher road tires generally seem to be elongated in height but not equally in width. Tubular tires would stay round in height and width.

    Also, 650B et. al. are followed by another number referring to tire size. It will be larger than 25 or 28 mm, although the total diameter of the wheel with tire mounted would be the same or very close.

    IOW, I find the new insistence on millimeters just as misleading or possibly more so than the old C designations.
    It's meant to be confusing. That's what marketing is all about.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    The Continental Ultra 2000 tires I have are printed on the sidewall, "700 x 25C." They're about 5 years old. The Gatorskins are marked "700 x 28C." WTF?

    Which leads to the question: is the size designation 25C or mm, 28C or mm, a measure of height or width?

    My measurements above seem to indicate height, and of course width would vary according to height, but not necessarily as much, depending on casing and rim width. Larger clincher road tires generally seem to be elongated in height but not equally in width. Tubular tires would stay round in height and width.

    Also, 650B et. al. are followed by another number referring to tire size. It will be larger than 25 or 28 mm, although the total diameter of the wheel with tire mounted would be the same or very close.

    IOW, I find the new insistence on millimeters just as misleading or possibly more so than the old C designations.
    Originally there was one tire size that in combination with a 622 diameter rim made up a 700c wheel. That was then, now there are many different width tires that fit a 622 rim, from as small or smaller than 20mm on up thru 40mm or larger. The wheel has stayed the same since its inception, but the tire has changed, and the tires change is measured in mm's. It doesn't matter that the manufacturer calls the tire size 25c, they may not care or know the history and are just printing what they think is right or what they think that the market understands.

    Why would a nominal 28mm tire be called 28c? A mm is a known, whether they hit the mark, or miss, so why settle for a "c" that means nothing unless measured in conjunction with a 622 rim, and then is only, in reality, one tire size?
    Too old to ride plastic

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