Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    591

    Cadence, Power, and Speed

    I used to ride with a cadence of around 60-80 rpm. Then, after doing some reading, I upped that to 80-100 to protect my knees and improve efficiency. I generally ride at around 82-85 rpm.

    Then I did a little experiment.

    I did a ride (Alpine Splash) on the Expresso bike at my gym - 2.93 mi

    The first time, I did it in 11:41, and put out about 164 watts
    Second time: 11:18, 190W
    Third time: 11:06, 196W
    at this point, I noticed that the guys on the leaderboard who were just a little faster than me (1-3 sec) generally put out 10-20 fewer watts.

    The fourth time, I really kept an eye on the wattage, and tried to keep a constant effort of 190W. I ended up with 187W and 10:57. My PR.

    The fifth time, I focused on cadence. I kept my cadence to 90rpm. I put out 209W, which was my highest power output, but my time was 11:19. My second slowest time.

    I don't know what my average RPM was on any of the other ride. I do know that it was significantly lower. Probably in the 60s or 70s. I just seem to pedal slower on the stationary bike.

    So here are a few possible conclusions:
    1. I would be faster on the road with a lower cadence.
    2. Expresso's calculations should not be trusted, and will not translate to the road.
    3. I am missing other variables including the fact that I used two different Expresso bikes, time of day, how well rested I was, etc.

    What do you guys think?

    Also, would this thread be better suited to the Training/Racing forum?

  2. #2
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    13,317
    Quote Originally Posted by TiCoyote View Post
    I ended up with 187W and 10:57.
    I put out 209W,.... my time was 11:19.
    So you put out 22 more watts but were 22 sec slower. That's a 12% increase in power. Pretty significant.


    So here are a few possible conclusions:
    1. I would be faster on the road with a lower cadence.
    2. Expresso's calculations should not be trusted, and will not translate to the road.
    3. I am missing other variables including the fact that I used two different Expresso bikes, time of day, how well rested I was, etc.
    Whatever this Expresso thing is.... it should not be trusted. On the road... or in the gym.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: taodemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    788
    I am not familiar with expresso bikes but most likely just the two different bikes are causing the differences. I'm pretty sure that x amount of watts over y distance should result in z time regardless of the rpm used to achieve it. These bikes don't factor in rider weight or have some place where that can be set do they? I guess something like that would also affect the results.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    26
    Your FTP is based only on power. FTP is a representation of your cycling fitness. I would go with power.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,120
    more power should always be done at higher cadence. Virtually no one wants to generate higher power at a lower cadence (other then done so for training purposes, but not for racing).

    Speed is variable, not a dependable measurement of fitness.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7,680
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    more power should always be done at higher cadence. Virtually no one wants to generate higher power at a lower cadence (other then done so for training purposes, but not for racing).

    Speed is variable, not a dependable measurement of fitness.
    On most long steep climbs it's not possible to carry a high cadence with a conventional cassette. It's important to train to what you expect to be riding (both gradient and cog maximums). Sometimes developing high power at a low cadence is what gets the job done.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    25,549
    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    On most long steep climbs it's not possible to carry a high cadence with a conventional cassette. It's important to train to what you expect to be riding (both gradient and cog maximums). Sometimes developing high power at a low cadence is what gets the job done.
    True.

    Most riders used to walking or running find maximum aerobic efficiency around 70-80 rpm. Faster cadences require more energy just to turn the crank around. But if the heart, lungs, and cardio system delivers, faster cadences won't trash out the legs like slower cadences would, working at the same high wattages. Eddy said, "To go fast, pedal fast," 90-95 rpm tempo, 110 rpm or faster in sprints. Train up the cardio system, increase VO2 max., save the legs. OP's stats above might indicate a need to train the legs at higher cadences they can't quite handle yet.

    Quite amazing pedaling fast, "out of breath," also increases strength when working the crank at lower cadences, such as climbing or time trialing. Hinault pointed this out years ago. All a function of aerobic conditioning, training the slow twitch muscle fibers.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 1 Week Ago at 10:56 PM.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,121
    If this machine is intended to replicate a hilly course, it may matter where in the course you put out the watts too. Differences vs other riders may be weight related if you put that in as a variable before starting. Other than that, it sounds like you are enjoying playing around with it and you are pushing yourself on it so you are getting a good workout which is all that matters.

    The results from a machine like that aren't necessarily going to transfer to the road. In the real world, watts is watts and it doesn't matter what cadence you are riding at when it comes to the speed.
    Gravel Rocks

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    2,006
    Quote Originally Posted by TiCoyote View Post
    I used to ride with a cadence of around 60-80 rpm. Then, after doing some reading, I upped that to 80-100 to protect my knees and improve efficiency. I generally ride at around 82-85 rpm.

    Then I did a little experiment.

    I did a ride (Alpine Splash) on the Expresso bike at my gym -
    What do you guys think?
    I think your equipment choice rendered your "test" invalid and fairly pointless aside from a decent workout.

    I wouldn't take anything away from those numbers.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,839
    Does the 'expresso' bike serve coffee, that would help me a lot. I assume you had more power with expresso, it is a proven fact that wheels turn faster with caffeine.
    BANNED

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    591
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Does the 'expresso' bike serve coffee, that would help me a lot. I assume you had more power with expresso, it is a proven fact that wheels turn faster with caffeine.
    The coffee is spelled "espresso" the bike is spelled "Expresso."

Similar Threads

  1. Speed vs. Cadence. Vs. Power
    By bgit in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 06-22-2018, 05:02 AM
  2. Maximum cadence and preferred cadence
    By Warrior in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 115
    Last Post: 10-15-2014, 06:41 PM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-04-2012, 08:38 PM
  4. Power, power and more power
    By uzziefly in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-07-2007, 11:13 AM
  5. Q's about Cadence Aero/Cadence VSR rims
    By Mike Prince in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-26-2007, 12:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.