Campy Asks, "Why Don't You Love Me No 'Mo?"

View Poll Results: Will Campagnolo Survive?

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  • Yes... Campy will reign supreme in the future!

    16 44.44%
  • No... Campy is already dead to me.

    12 33.33%
  • What is this "Campy" you spake of?

    8 22.22%
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  1. #1
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    Question Campy Asks, "Why Don't You Love Me No 'Mo?"

    When I was a kid in the 80's, I drooled over Campagnolo components. To me, Italian frames with Campy components where "the cat's pajamas" and I dreamed of owning both someday. When polished aluminum components where cool, Campy's C Record Groupset was the equivalent of bicycle p0rn...



    Fast-forward to today, I have to remind myself that Campy still exists. I can't remember the last time I saw a bike with Campy components.

    As the article below questions, will Campy survive into the future? Do you own any bikes with Campy components? Why would anyone choose Campy over SRAM or Shimano these days?

    Cycling Tips (2017): How Campagnolo plans to stay relevant in a changing market
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  2. #2
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Have a Campag Chorus rig and a Shimano Di2 one....The Di2 shifts as well, and the cassette costs 50-70% less; and is more readily available

    I suspect Campag is going to be bought out soon....they myopically focused on the road racing segment for too long--an increasingly irrelevant segment in terms or market size. Deals with distributors are also a problem--so you have to go out of your way to buy it. I'm just about done fighting their MAP practice. If/when my road rig needs a new group it is getting either etap or wireless Di2 (if/when the latter exists).


    TBH the only reason my road rig got upgraded to 2015 Chorus was because I could import it from UK cheaper than Ultegra....something that has since ended.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
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    I have 4 bikes with Campy right now (3 Italian steel and one Ti). I also have a CF bike that has SRAM Rival on it but the right lever exploded a few years ago and I know use Veloce levers (works really well). I dont know if they will survive or not, but I plan to stick with Campy for now

  4. #4
    Eddy 53:11
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    I LOVE Campy, have several bikes full build. BUT, Campy has not stayed up with the times or R&D and continues to sit on their laurels proclaiming, "We're Campag, soooooo, there." "You'll always be here for US."

    My new build will probably be Red. It is SO painful to consider, BUT here I am. Unlesssss, I do a Wilier Cento 10 or a C64. THEN, it's -against- the rules to equip otherwise! You'll find yourself in Hell one day trying to explain yer way out of THAT situation.
    Live vicariously through yourself.
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  5. #5
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    Campagnolo on my four bikes.

    I think that it's a shame SunTour was put out of business by Shimano. I'd hate to see the same happen to Campagnolo, but I don't think that will happen till us old fcks that are still loyal hang it up.

    As far as the cost of Campagnolo cassettes, I just put a Miche cassette on my daily rider and the price was good, plus the gear ratio can be built to order. Haven't ridden it yet, just completed the overhaul an hour ago, but it shifted well on the stand and a quick ride around the block.
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #6
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    My name is Bruce and I'm a Campyholic. Need I say more? I don't know where you're coming from. There's nothing else for me.

  7. #7
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    been a cyclist for over half a century, never owned a single item made by Campy.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    been a cyclist for over half a century, never owned a single item made by Campy.
    I was as well for about the same time. Was tiring of several things about the company then road a friends bike with R9100 on it (I was on 2016 Record) and was blown away at the shifting; specifically the front derailleur as it shifts like butter. Dumped my Record group and bought 9100. I like the hoods on my Campy group, but thatís it.

  9. #9
    Pack Fodder.
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    Shifter ergonomics never worked for me. Loved the crisp shifting, style, and serviceability, but the price and availability crossed Campagnolo off for me.

    But yeah, it was really those thumb shifters.

  10. #10
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    Camp ayn yolo is an oft discussed topic on here.

    Lessee. I grew up with Campagnolo all around me since the early 70s. I finally got a bike with all Campy (C Record) around 1989. It was the best at the time, though that bike was stolen within a year and I had to campaign using Shimano 105/600 into the 90s. Since 2001 I have been using Shimano, and it is everything Campy used to be. Precision, reliable top performing stuff.

    I still have almost two complete groups of Campagnolo in my possession. Athena friction group from around 1990 and Veloce from 2018. Hardly ever use it, but the bike hangs on the wall cause it's so pretty. It all works just fine. I could live with Campy as my own groupset, even. I don't like their cassette situation is all. My 'perfect bike for riding lots' is built around Ultegra.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    Camp ayn yolo is an oft discussed topic on here.

    Lessee. I grew up with Campagnolo all around me since the early 70s. I finally got a bike with all Campy (C Record) around 1989. It was the best at the time, though that bike was stolen within a year and I had to campaign using Shimano 105/600 into the 90s. Since 2001 I have been using Shimano, and it is everything Campy used to be. Precision, reliable top performing stuff.

    I still have almost two complete groups of Campagnolo in my possession. Athena friction group from around 1990 and Veloce from 2018. Hardly ever use it, but the bike hangs on the wall cause it's so pretty. It all works just fine. I could live with Campy as my own groupset, even. I don't like their cassette situation is all. My 'perfect bike for riding lots' is built around Ultegra.
    Up to the '80s, Campy was so far above all the others, it was the exclusive equipment on racing bikes mortals lusted for. It was overbuilt, durable as hell, bulletproof. The bearings worked so smoothly. Everything looked so solid, form follows function. Nuovo and Super Record late '70s early '80s were the standard of comparison available in all pro shops.

    Then came Shimano Dura Ace. They got mortals on to Shimano 600 morphed later into Ultegra and kicked out Suntour in the serious bike market. The European brands were struggling to gain a foothold in the USA. Simplex, Miche, the poor man's Campy.

    No question Shimano is indeed as good now as Campy was in its heyday. And SRAM is building up a great reputation. But whoever takes over Campy if that happens, will preserve the name and quality of the man who started it. Tullio is the patron saint of cycling. His followers at the plant must turn out product that honor his legacy. They're doing a great job, no?

    I upgraded to Campy Super Record on a flippy Puch in '81, equipped with Shimano 600 EX, heavy, clunky, headset bearings brinneled, rear derailleur got out of alignment, brakes were mushy. All the Campy stuff, Super Record on sales from Nashbar, responded stiffly and lasted forever. "Like going from a Ford Mustang to a Ferrari" we used to say. Campy was beyond our pedestrian or automotive experience. Amazing, Campy still designs in clicks to remind the rider he's working a manual instrument, a bike. Shimano followed the opposite criteria: remove the rider from the experience, smooth out those clicks.

    Nonetheless, Shimano durability is no longer a question. So choice becomes a matter of taste. Apologies to Honda Civic; in bike related stuff, I'll take Italian over Japanese. Classic Italian bikes are highly prized in Japan, hear tell. Sez it all.

  12. #12
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    Exactly. It's a matter of taste. The Campagnolo will do the job as well as any brand, and in some ways there are little things about it to prefer over the others, like the front derailleur control.

    Interestingly, Campagnolo may be the more available groupset nowadays, since Shimano and SRAM have stomped out ecommerce exports: https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/ca/en/groupsets (hmm $1600usd for a Super Record groupset)
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  13. #13
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    I think Campy needs to convince one or more major bike manufacturers, other than Bianchi, to start putting their components on bikes. The vast majority of bikes are sold as complete bikes and almost none of them come with Campy.

  14. #14
    Never Give Up!
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    been a cyclist for many years, what is this Campy you speak of... never seen Campy products on any of my fellow road rider bikes and/or road ventures.... I also never owned a single item made by Campy.

    Shimano, Shimano, Shimano it's all about Shimano
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    I upgraded to Campy Super Record on a flippy Puch in '81, equipped with Shimano 600 EX, heavy, clunky, headset bearings brinneled, rear derailleur got out of alignment, brakes were mushy. All the Campy stuff, Super Record on sales from Nashbar, responded stiffly and lasted forever. "Like going from a Ford Mustang to a Ferrari" we used to say. Campy was beyond our pedestrian or automotive experience. Amazing, Campy still designs in clicks to remind the rider he's working a manual instrument, a bike. Shimano followed the opposite criteria: remove the rider from the experience, smooth out those clicks.

    Nonetheless, Shimano durability is no longer a question. So choice becomes a matter of taste. Apologies to Honda Civic; in bike related stuff, I'll take Italian over Japanese. Classic Italian bikes are highly prized in Japan, hear tell. Sez it all.
    When exemplifying Japanese brand with Italian brand, shouldn't that (in bold) have been "Honda Accord to a Ferrari"?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    I think Campy needs to convince one or more major bike manufacturers, other than Bianchi, to start putting their components on bikes. The vast majority of bikes are sold as complete bikes and almost none of them come with Campy.
    I 100% agree. They really missed the boat on this. They need to make deals with OEMs to get their components on some bikes. It might be too late though.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    When exemplifying Japanese brand with Italian brand, shouldn't that (in bold) have been "Honda Accord to a Ferrari"?
    Agree, Fredrico should really know better

  18. #18
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    So... I just built up a frame. I bought a tig welded steel Merckx frame. I thought Campy was the obvious choice for a throw back frame of allegedly Belgian design. As I dug into the search for parts for the frame, I was put off by the availability and cost of Campy components. Also, the limitations on wheel choices. Been a SRAM guy for years and was thinking Iíd default to Red, nice and light and I like double tap. Nope. I wound up getting a great deal on a lightly used Shimano 9000 group and went all in, including the 24 wheels. I donít have a ton of miles on it yet, but I really like it so far. The FD shifting is amazing. Quick and confident. I canít say that about my SRAM experience but I havenít ridden Red. Been a long time for me and Shimano... The reunion is going pretty damn well. Iím not getting any chain contact on the little rings on the small cogs which I have on my SRAM set up.


    I wouldnít say Iím optimistic about Campy surviving. When a roadie wants to build up a bike with it and gets discouraged I think you have a deeper problem. You may simply be dead but still up and walking... So, in the interest of full disclosure, I have ridden thumb buttons. I donít understand why anyone would want to do that, so in the back of my head, I wasnít a super pro Campy adopter. That said, I would have still done it, for the nod to the elegance. Ours is a sport where a nod to the elegance has meaning. It is one of the many things that I love about the sport and practice of road cycling.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  19. #19
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    I'm a big fan of the thumb buttons, never thought that a swinging brake lever made sense and don't even want to think about a lever that shifts up or down dependent on the length of the arc the lever is pushed.
    Too old to ride plastic

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    They need to make deals with OEMs to get their components on some bikes. It might be too late though.
    It is. They donít have the clout to make OEM deals like Shimano.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    So... I just built up a frame. I bought a tig welded steel Merckx frame...
    ...I wouldnít say Iím optimistic about Campy surviving. When a roadie wants to build up a bike with it and gets discouraged I think you have a deeper problem.

    I have a Merckx frame fetish, I need pics!

    I totally agree... if a roadie building a custom European frame set doesn't go Campy, who will!?!?
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'm a big fan of the thumb buttons, never thought that a swinging brake lever made sense and don't even want to think about a lever that shifts up or down dependent on the length of the arc the lever is pushed.
    +1 on the thumb buttons. Makes so much more sense than the dual inboard levers. Also prefer the resounding "click" of gear changes.

    I have one bike with Shimano 105 10sp, the other with 8sp. Campy Ergo. I'll take the 8sp any day.

    When I couldn't afford Campagnolo, I had Suntour Superbe Pro, just like Gianni Bugno and the Chateau d'Ax team. It's a shame what Shimano did to that company.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    +1 on the thumb buttons. Makes so much more sense than the dual inboard levers.

    When I couldn't afford Campagnolo, I had Suntour Superbe Pro, just like Gianni Bugno and the Chateau d'Ax team. It's a shame what Shimano did to that company.
    While I disagree with the first statement, I gave you rep for the second statement.

  24. #24
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    Campyís arrogance allowed them to sit on the sidelines for years while others surpassed their products not only in technology but in price and quality. Campy will never be the prestigious product again.

  25. #25
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    No...

    But from what I see and hear, the Campy Bora wheels are still the cats pyjamas?

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