Chiropractic for back pain? - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    So are lots and lots of MDs.
    Point taken and sadly true.

    As far as chiropractic here is how it works in the big picture when looking at the population of people with bad backs.

    For people that are experiencing acute back pain from an "ordinary injury", like "I bent over to pick up a light object from the floor and I hurt my back more often than not chiropractic treatment is the best choice for direct and first contact care.

    The caveat is that one goes to a good chiropractor. (How one determines that is a story that I will bypass to keep things pithy.)

  2. #27
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    I thought I would post a follow-up. I ended up going to a DC on Friday. After looking me over he put me on the table and worked me over like Rocky Balboa on a bag of meat. He stopped a couple of times and asked if that was too much pressure. I said "yes" but that didn't seem to change anything. He did use the ultrasound wand, but very aggressively. He said I "might be a bit sore" afterwards. The next morning I was in more pain than I ever had been with this injury. I was supposed to go back today but I called and cancelled as I am still in pain, and didn't want to face even worse. He did give me some stretching exercises which I plan to do, but I don't think I'll go back

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    He said I "might be a bit sore" afterwards. The next morning I was in more pain than I ever had been with this injury.
    This sums up my experiences. In many way, I wish that I could be more positive (with a traditional Martial Arts background I'm not against alternatives) but having to seek medication afterwards was disappointing.

    Thankfully, there appear to be alternatives for everyone (ultrasound & electric stem seemed to ease pain and speed recovery but only in concert with pain killers, muscle relaxers and REST).

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akirasho View Post
    Thankfully, there appear to be alternatives for everyone (ultrasound & electric stem seemed to ease pain and speed recovery but only in concert with pain killers, muscle relaxers and REST).
    You left out acupuncture.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    I said "yes" but that didn't seem to change anything.
    Any care provider who does not listen is bad. That's a rule I have for all care, if they don't listen, we go to someone else.

    If the chiro can't pop something back in place (relatively quickly) then it wasn't really a problem to take to one. But unfortunately, unless you know what's what (like with chronic problems) the only way to know is to try.

    I would think a PT would be worth a try. They can get things to release, and often recommend better stretches than an MD, since that is what they do. Maybe your MD will refer you for two sessions? Once to see if you can get immediate relief and get exercises, one for followup and evaluation. A physical therapist who works with cyclists, if possible, is a good idea.
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    Any care provider who does not listen is bad. That's a rule I have for all care, if they don't listen, we go to someone else.

    If the chiro can't pop something back in place (relatively quickly) then it wasn't really a problem to take to one. But unfortunately, unless you know what's what (like with chronic problems) the only way to know is to try.

    I would think a PT would be worth a try. They can get things to release, and often recommend better stretches than an MD, since that is what they do. Maybe your MD will refer you for two sessions? Once to see if you can get immediate relief and get exercises, one for followup and evaluation. A physical therapist who works with cyclists, if possible, is a good idea.
    At this point I am afraid to use chiropractic again, even if its possible another practitioner would be better. I have been doing the expanded stretching, using a massage mat, and paying attention to posture and I am starting to slowly improve again. I have not been on the trainer for over 2 weeks now which is frustrating the that groundhog said spring will be here next week. I am definitively not ready to ride on the road yet

  7. #32
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    I hurt my back at work back in November. Went to the Doctor and saw a chiropractor. The Doctor recommended rest and the chiropractor did some massages and used a TENS unit - basically electrical stimulus. After about 3 weeks I was back to work.
    You can't fix stupid.

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    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    I hurt my back at work back in November. Went to the Doctor and saw a chiropractor. The Doctor recommended rest and the chiropractor did some massages and used a TENS unit - basically electrical stimulus. After about 3 weeks I was back to work.
    Sometimes it boils down to perceptions:

    I can recommend rest and meds and have you back on your feet in a week or recommend rest and electric stim to get you back in about seven days.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    Any care provider who does not listen is bad. That's a rule I have for all care, if they don't listen, we go to someone else.

    If the chiro can't pop something back in place (relatively quickly) then it wasn't really a problem to take to one. But unfortunately, unless you know what's what (like with chronic problems) the only way to know is to try.

    I would think a PT would be worth a try. They can get things to release, and often recommend better stretches than an MD, since that is what they do. Maybe your MD will refer you for two sessions? Once to see if you can get immediate relief and get exercises, one for followup and evaluation. A physical therapist who works with cyclists, if possible, is a good idea.
    Again, excellent point. (Your choosing a resident supervisor as your GP is also a nugget of gold. I work with docs all the day long. I asked them and picked the person that kept popping up in their recommendations...) PT has a sound whole body preparation. For stretches and the like they are the go to... At least to me. I work with PTs also. Been a huge benefit. PT gets the whole exertion component like no one else. They are important for cyclists IMO because our sport really makes us better and faster at riding bikes. Then there is life... Some of which, at least, is not on a bike. PT gets “THAT” better than other provider by far. They study exercise. They are kinesiology practitioners.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  10. #35
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    Sorry to learn of your experience. Secondarily, your experience may be linked to what I posted earlier:
    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    For people that are experiencing acute back pain from an "ordinary injury", like "I bent over to pick up a light object from the floor and I hurt my back more often than not chiropractic treatment is the best choice for direct and first contact care.

    The caveat is that one goes to a good chiropractor. (How one determines that is a story that I will bypass to keep things pithy.)
    One thing that is for sure 90 plus percent of the time is you should feel better, not worse or additionally injured or sore after treatment.

  11. #36
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    As someone with a lifetime "sore back" (bad fall in 1973 has left me with disc degeneration, arthritis in my spine, etc.) I only turned to treatment when things got really bad about 10 years ago, when the dog couldn't figure out why I was walking around on all fours!

    Much of what I'd say has been said, so I'll summarise, and add a point.

    1) It depends hugely on the individual - some chiropractors (and massage therapists, and osteos, etc.) can help, but some could make you a whole lot worse. ANY of the above who ignores your feedback ("that really hurts"!, "I really don't like that", "I'm concerned that I got a lot worse after last time") should be discarded to the waste bin. I still experience sciatic problems from one session with an awful massage therapist who ignored my pleas to stop (I'm no wimp)

    2) Ask about the treatment and diagnosis before, during and after treatment. Keep asking questions. If a chiro (or massage therapist, blah, blah) can't explain when you ask them "What is that structure you are working on, and what is that movement/pressure/treatment supposed to do to help?", I'd similarly think of ditching them.

    3) I'd agree that a chiro should be able to help with an acute issue (s the OP has), they also can help with chronic issues - mine, for example, has been helped by chiros and massage therapists, though some were much more effective than others.

    4) If you can find someone who has an interest in sport, especially cycling, and especially if they cycle themselves, that will help hugely. They will not only be more sympathetic, but hopefully more familiar with your needs.

    5) (My additional point) - regardless of whether you see a chiro, physio, osteo, whatever, find someone who will teach you to help yourself. Getting tweaked every 2-4 weeks isn't the solution =- you need power over your situation. Being able to self-manage means you are not so dependent on the professional. Cycling is terrible activity for creating imbalances - your hips are constantly in flexion, which causes all sorts of tightness that needs to be worked out, and weakness in the core that needs to be strengthened. Boring, boring stuff, but potentially much more effective than a quick $50 fix every month.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Interested in forum experiences with chiropractic. I hurt my back about a month ago hauling firewood. I figured I would be OK in a few days. The pain got worse and eventually I started getting these really painful back spasms. I could barely get out of bed. I went to the doctor and he advised some stretching exercises. Within a day of doing the exercises, the spasms went away and I thought I was on the road to recovery. However, since then it has stayed about the same. Not super painful but it restricts what I can do.
    Along with everything else suggested try taking a good Glucosamine, Chrondroitin, MSM supplement like NatureMade Triple Flex twice a day. I have slight scoliosis, which didn't bother me for the first 65 years of my life. I strained my back doing some heavy lifting work and developed similar symptoms. Taking the supplement along with stretching exercises, hot bath soaks, and taking it easy on the bike I have no issues at age 73. Knocking wood!!!

  13. #38
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    I wouldn't let a chiropractor touch me. I have always thought of them a few steps up from palm readers. If the doc's suggestions - rest, stretching, etc. don't do it, I'd get a referral for a good physical therapist.

    Then, when you're all back to normal - get in the gym! We - cyclists - get next to zero upper body work while on the bike. We have GOT to supplement that with core/upper body work. I spend a couple hours/week in the gym doing just upper body and core. I'm not working on a "spring break body"... I just don't want to get hurt moving the couch.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    Chiropractic for back pain? Yes or no depends strictly upon what's the cause of the pain and getting the right Chiropractor to treat it if indicated.
    I would agree with this. However, my own experience was not positive. Five years ago I herniated my L4-L5 disk. I went to a chiropractor for a few weeks to see if that might help. I would come out of the office feeling relief after the usual Tens and adjustment, but it would not last very long. So, he went a little more aggressive and really hurt me. I could barely walk out of his office and it was the last time I darkened his doorway. I went to an highly recommended orthopedic surgeon next, and after an MRI and insurance mandated steroid injection (did not work) I had surgery. Six months later I did a 640 mile cycling week and I've done well ever since.

    So, back to the OP's original question, it really depends what the problem is, and who you are dealing with. My wife is currently working with a good chiro and it seems to be helping.
    There I was...

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clipped_in View Post
    I would agree with this. However, my own experience was not positive. Five years ago I herniated my L4-L5 disk. I went to a chiropractor for a few weeks to see if that might help. I would come out of the office feeling relief after the usual Tens and adjustment, but it would not last very long. So, he went a little more aggressive and really hurt me. I could barely walk out of his office and it was the last time I darkened his doorway. I went to an highly recommended orthopedic surgeon next, and after an MRI and insurance mandated steroid injection (did not work) I had surgery. Six months later I did a 640 mile cycling week and I've done well ever since.

    So, back to the OP's original question, it really depends what the problem is, and who you are dealing with. My wife is currently working with a good chiro and it seems to be helping.
    640 mile cycling week? Hard man... truly. Nice work. I’m fully impressed.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by davelikestoplay View Post
    I will add to the chorus of opinions that say Chiro is good for a very focused need.. spinal back/neck issues. I have seen many different DCs over more than 25 years and when they stick to that I find them useful and more than worth it. It also helps that I live in Canada and my employer health plan coverage means that a visit only costs me about $10
    My opinion is that their competency is even more limited to just the lower back. I would not trust a chiro to crack my neck! That's just dangerous. https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.75b50c418d65

    Their idea of 'subluxation theory' causing all manner of issues, even lower back pain, is not based in science. They're really just doing a kind of massage for the lower back and like a stopped clock get it right sometimes. https://www.quackwatch.org/01Quacker.../chirosub.html

    I went to a chiro once for an acute lower back pain issue. It did not help at all. More recnetly I have been seeing a PT for a shoulder issue. she is great!
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  17. #42
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    Here is the FAQ section from a Chiropractor that I've known 37 years. The info in the FAQ is indicative of what I would define along with other traits and skills for a "Good Chiropractor" which is the type of practitioner I allude to when considering whether to seek treatment from a chiropractor.

    Will you explain my condition?
    Yes. We will review your diagnosis with you, so that you understand your condition. We feel this allows you to become more informed and involved in controlling your own health.

    How long will therapy take?
    The length of your treatment will depend upon a number of factors, including the length of time you have experienced your problem, your general health, your exercise habits, the nature of your work and/or daily activities, and your level of commitment to getting well.

    Treatment may range from a few visits for a simple condition to several months of visits for a more complicated case. Our goal is to help you get well as quickly as possible, then give you tools and information to help you manage your condition on your own. The extent to which a patient can benefit from care varies depending on their problem and how long it has existed.

    Is chiropractic care effective and safe?
    Yes. Many controlled and independent research studies indicate that chiropractic care is an effective and safe method of care for low back pain, neck pain, headaches and other conditions relating to the spine. A recent Canadian report supported the safety, effectiveness, and scientific validity of chiropractic. The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services has also endorsed chiropractic services. And chiropractic services were shown to be effective in an issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

    In terms of cost-effectiveness, studies show that chiropractic care lowers health care costs by decreasing the use of expensive technology and inpatient services. Chiropractic also provides higher patient satisfaction than other types of care. Based on these scientific studies, the consensus is that chiropractic care is the treatment of choice for most spinal problems.

    What do medical doctors say about chiropractic?
    Chiropractic treatment is gaining wider acceptance among the medical profession for a variety of spinal conditions. Many medical doctors recognize the value of chiropractors for the management of functional disorders of the spine. A recent research survey found, "A majority of family medical doctors have encouraged patients to see a chiropractor" (The Journal of Family Practice). Moreover, Grannis Chiropractic Clinic has an excellent professional relationship with the medical community of South Orange County.

    Does it hurt?
    We make every attempt to use procedures that are as gentle as possible. Most patients are relieved at how comfortable our treatments are. Any discomfort is usually temporary, lasting only seconds or minutes. We are proud of our reputation for gentle care. This is the reason why our patients continue to refer their friends and family members to our clinic.

    What is the noise I hear during manipulation?
    When your spine is manipulated, tiny air bubbles in the fluid inside your joints “pop”. This is normal and is similar to the sound you can make when cracking your knuckles.

    Will my condition return?
    Research suggests that 50% to 70% of all patients will see the problem return. However, in our experience, we have found that whether a problem returns is often within the patient’s control. When patients faithfully perform their exercises and modify previously detrimental lifestyles and work activities, the likelihood of recurrence is reduced. Patients play an active part in healing their condition and preventing the likelihood of recurrence.

    Can I just treat myself?
    No. A chiropractor studies for years to understand when, where and how to deliver manipulative therapy to a patient. Yet, a chiropractor cannot and will not perform the procedure upon himself. The likelihood of damage when attempting self-treatment is high and has been documented by researchers.

    Can you treat children?
    Musculoskeletal care is not dependent upon age. Research has shown that some children experience back and neck pain. Although their tissues are generally resilient, some children need chiropractic care to restore normal function or alleviate pain from injuries.

    Am I too old for chiropractic care?
    Chiropractic treatment is for people of all ages, including senior citizens. With growing concerns about over-medication and the side effects of combining various prescription drugs, chiropractic care is more important than ever for the aging population. Restoring better spinal function can help improve mobility, vitality, endurance, and appetite. Many patients report improvement in arthritic symptoms and other chronic ailments associated with aging.

    I have heard that once you start going to a chiropractor, you never stop.
    Many chiropractors recommend continuing “maintenance care”. But researchers have not been able to demonstrate the benefit of seeing a chiropractor on a regular basis once a condition is stabilized or resolved. Therefore, we generally do not encourage additional treatment beyond the point of maximum improvement. We do, however, recommend an annual examination in order to detect early changes in your spinal health. Additionally, we encourage you to come in if you sense an old problem returning or a new condition developing. The earlier we begin treating a problem, the sooner you will experience relief.

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