Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    11

    Converting to road biking...

    So since I rarely go off road anymore any when I do it's just tightly packed gravel, and considering my rides are 95% on pavement, I am switching to road biking. I just put a Giant Contend 3 on layaway at my local bike shop, in the small size since I have a rather very short inseam. I only have a few questions for the pros here...


    * I weigh in at 240(ish) pounds. Will the wheelset hold me up? Looks like it has the Giant SR3 wheelset with 32 spokes in the rear, 24 up front.
    * Will I get used to the brake/shifter combo coming from years of trigger shifters on mountain bikes and hybrids?
    * Should I worry about flats with my weight on the bike?
    * Will I notice a speed increase on my rides since I'm not pushing a 35 pound mountain bike with 2.25 inch tires around?

    Thank guys. Need this advice before I pick it up on Friday.
    Last edited by kona0197; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:14 AM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,524
    Yes, yes, yes & yes.

    The wheelset should be fine for your weight, as long as they are well built and properly tensioned. The rear wheel is going to take the brunt of the punishment, and 32 spokes should be plenty strong.

    You'll get used to the shifters in no time.

    Make sure your tires are fully inflated before every ride, and check the tread for imbedded shards.

    Of course you'll be faster. Isn't that the whole point of going from a mountain bike to a road bike?

    Enjoy the road.
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  3. #3
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    13,098
    Quote Originally Posted by kona0197 View Post
    * I weigh in at 240(ish) pounds. Will the wheelset hold me up? Looks like it has the Giant SR3 wheelset with 32 spokes in the rear, 24 up front.
    You should be fine. The front wheel looks to be straight pull. I'd prefer the front wheel to be cross laced and 28 spokes. But shouldn't be a problem. Since these are entry level wheels, they're probably machine built. After the first couple rides, check all the spokes and make sure none are loose. Wouldn't be a bad idea to ask your bike shop to check the spoke tension.

    * Will I get used to the brake/shifter combo coming from years of trigger shifters on mountain bikes and hybrids?
    Yes. They're very intuitive. You'll have no problem.

    * Should I worry about flats with my weight on the bike?
    No. Which model year do you have? Looks like the 2018 has 25mm tires and the 2019 has 28mm tires. 25mm tires would be acceptable. 28mm highly prefered.

    * Will I notice a speed increase on my rides since I'm not pushing a 35 pound mountain bike with 2.25 inch tires around?
    Yes. Very much so.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  4. #4
    Neophyte
    Reputation: jetdog9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,621
    Yes x4.

    Keep in mind your front derailleur probably has trim, meaning 4 positions and not 2. Sometimes new folks don't realize that.

  5. #5
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,075
    I like trim.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    297
    I have some experience riding at close to that weight.

    You should be fine in all regards, just be mindful of your tire pressure. As long as you keep the pressure adequate to prevent pinch flats, you'll be fine.

    I can't prescribe a specific pressure because everyone is different in terms of their bike handling, and terrain will be variable as well. You'll have to go by 'feel',

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    225
    when you wear out the original tires, replace them with as large as possible. I now use 32's and they are awesome!

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    11
    I was also considering the Liv Bliss. Don't laugh, men's bikes really don't fit me due to short inseam. It is a hybrid with hydraulic brakes. Thoughts? Still scared the Giant would break on me.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by kona0197 View Post
    I was also considering the Liv Bliss. Don't laugh, men's bikes really don't fit me due to short inseam. It is a hybrid with hydraulic brakes. Thoughts? Still scared the Giant would break on me.
    I would think a men's bike should fit better. Women usually have a long inseam relative to their height. I'd go for whatever fits well though.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by kona0197 View Post
    * Will I get used to the brake/shifter combo coming from years of trigger shifters on mountain bikes and hybrids?
    I got used to the shifting after a few rides and it now feels more natural than the trigger shifters on my MTB.

    Regarding braking - you'll also get used to it with the caveat that when on the hoods the braking force is much weaker than in the drops and certainly not to be used on descents unless you want to force yourself to go slow.

  11. #11
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    164
    Yes, yes and yes, with one caveat that you might have to get the bike shop to respoke and tension your wheels for Clydesdale class riders like yourself. You will get used to road shifters within a day especially if you go with Shimano and not SRAM or Campag which can be a little different. If your bike is fitted properly for height, stack and reach and you are riding a road bike properly (its supposed to be slightly uncomfortable just like a road bike is for motorbikes) then you will go faster. If you set it up for riding like a touring bike you'll go slightly slower. So ask your shop to fit you properly with a more agressive race fit and not a touring fit.

    The point of riding a road bike is to get you into the spirit of riding a road bike where average speeds can get up to 40km/hr for a category A rider.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:28 PM.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,881
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I like trim.
    All good helpful advice in this thread except for this one. But I shouldn't have expected anything less from the resident troll.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #13
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    All good helpful advice in this thread except for this one. But I shouldn't have expected anything less from the resident troll.
    Relax mate. If you let them wind you up all the time like you do they're going to drag you down to their level and beat you over the head with a large stick.
    Last edited by 1500SLR; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:34 PM.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    567
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    I would think a men's bike should fit better. Women usually have a long inseam relative to their height. I'd go for whatever fits well though.
    This is actually urban legend. Probably because women wear clothes that accentuate the length of their legs and men don't.

    Women generally have shorter arms than men, however. Along with wider sit bones and narrower shoulders.

  15. #15
    Out riding.
    Reputation: 1500SLR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    164
    Calling Giant Liv was dumb, it segments their market. If you ride a Trek WSD bike no one knows and some guys might compliment you on a Celeste coloured bike... If you ride a Liv everyone knows. Why can't I ride a bright purple bike anyway Does this confuse you?

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7,648
    Quote Originally Posted by kona0197 View Post
    So since I rarely go off road anymore any when I do it's just tightly packed gravel, and considering my rides are 95% on pavement, I am switching to road biking. I just put a Giant Contend 3 on layaway at my local bike shop, in the small size since I have a rather very short inseam. I only have a few questions for the pros here...


    * I weigh in at 240(ish) pounds. Will the wheelset hold me up? Looks like it has the Giant SR3 wheelset with 32 spokes in the rear, 24 up front.
    * Will I get used to the brake/shifter combo coming from years of trigger shifters on mountain bikes and hybrids?
    * Should I worry about flats with my weight on the bike?
    * Will I notice a speed increase on my rides since I'm not pushing a 35 pound mountain bike with 2.25 inch tires around?

    Thank guys. Need this advice before I pick it up on Friday.
    Where do you live, more specifically, what kind of terrain do you ride?

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    567
    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    Calling Giant Liv was dumb, it segments their market. If you ride a Trek WSD bike no one knows and some guys might compliment you on a Celeste coloured bike... If you ride a Liv everyone knows. Why can't I ride a bright purple bike anyway Does this confuse you?
    I'm with you here. I've got a new Santa Cruz Bronson on order. The Juliana Roubion (same damn bike but women's branded) has *way* better colors. Problem isn't that I mind the branding, it's that it tanks the resale value, because women will buy a men's bike but men are delicate and won't buy a women's branded bike.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    388
    Quote Originally Posted by masont View Post
    This is actually urban legend. Probably because women wear clothes that accentuate the length of their legs and men don't.

    Women generally have shorter arms than men, however. Along with wider sit bones and narrower shoulders.
    Seems like you're right. Maybe he should try a women's bike. Are Women's Body Proportions Different From Men's? -

  19. #19
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,921
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I like trim.
    And big ones to play with and feed on.
    That's what I'm talkin' about.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,875
    Quote Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
    Calling Giant Liv was dumb, it segments their market. If you ride a Trek WSD bike no one knows and some guys might compliment you on a Celeste coloured bike... If you ride a Liv everyone knows. Why can't I ride a bright purple bike anyway Does this confuse you?
    Allied’s purple finish is a bike I’d LOVE to have as a daily ride!!!

    https://builder.alliedcycleworks.com...d-ultegra-di2/
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  21. #21
    The Slow One.
    Reputation: Alaska Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,713
    OP- I've said it before, Giant manages to put together a great bang-for-your-buck package. Enjoy your ride and don't worry about the components. Maintained properly, they should do fine.

    On that note, after putting some miles on it, bring it back to the shop and have them check it out- especially spoke tension since wheel durability is a concern of yours. A checkup is usually part of any bike sale from a LBS, and developing a relationship with the mechanics is always a good idea. Beer and/or pizza never hurts on that front.

    Don't worry about major upgrades. The places you should look at investing in are the contact points- feet, backside, and hands. The advantage of this is that these "upgrades" are portable- you can take them with you to the next bike if you want to. A good saddle that fits your sit bones/riding style with some good bibs, a pair of stiff soled cycling shoes/pedals, and good gloves/bar tape all can do wonders. Even a different shape of aluminum handlebar can be sourced cheaply and improve comfort.

    If you got the rim brake version, a set of better brake pads when the originals wear out wouldn't a bad idea either.

    It's amazing what little tweaks can do to make a world of difference, and they don't have to cost a lot.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    11
    Guys, I'm thankful for the help, but I ended up getting another mountain bike. Why? Because I would miss my twice a year off road trips I take, the hydraulic disk brakes that you can't find on a $600 road bike, the precise fit, and I don't have to worry about breaking the frame or fork under my weight. Maybe I'll take up road bike next year. Sorry.

    It's really about getting out and riding, not about the bike...

  23. #23
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,075
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    All good helpful advice.
    thx mate

Similar Threads

  1. Road biking vs. Mountain biking - physiological difference etc.
    By mm9 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 05-28-2015, 10:07 AM
  2. Putting the fun back into biking...through mountain biking!!
    By p_b_bistou in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-19-2013, 11:29 AM
  3. looking for road biking clothes that don't look like road biking clothes
    By amheck in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-10-2008, 03:29 AM
  4. Converting Road Bike parts to CX Bikes
    By ByronLing in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-31-2004, 10:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.