Cross-Country Bike Trip
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  1. #1
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    Cross-Country Bike Trip

    So a friend and I are doing a cross-country bike trip (from San Diego, CA to Savannah, GA) to raise money for an orphanage in Haiti that was destroyed in the recent earthquakes. We are working on getting companies to sponsor us, so I was wondering if anyone had done anything like this, and who they contacted. Also, we have never done anything this big, any advice? Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
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    we have never done anything this big, any advice?
    From your website, I see that you've leaving in about two weeks. What is your overall bike touring experience? Cycling fitness level?

    Answers to general questions about riding cross-country could fill a book. How you're planning on carrying your stuff -- i.e., in panniers, in a trailer, in a support vehicle -- is pretty much decision#1, as that will influence bike choice, gearing choice, etc.

    Not to be too dismissive here, but the best quote I've ever seen regarding cross-country riding is "anybody who wants to ride cross-country should start with a small country".

  3. #3
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    Check out this blog about a Dad and his 2 daughters who rode from Oregon to Virginia and lived to tell the tale:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p..._id=61420&v=K7
    As long as people believe in absurdities they will continue to commit atrocities. Voltaire

    A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned - this is the sum of good government. Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Send Hugh Hefner an email.
    He just wrote a check for 900,000 dollars to save some rickety sign in California.

    Sorry, I have no idea. Good luck with your ride.
    Many memories will be had.

  5. #5
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by WaynefromOrlando
    Check out this blog about a Dad and his 2 daughters who rode from Oregon to Virginia and lived to tell the tale:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p..._id=61420&v=K7
    Sounded familiar. My buddy and I met these 3 in Council, ID on our cross-country adventure.

    We were the 2 guys hauling a floor pump: http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p..._id=61432&v=KY

    Small world.

  6. #6
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhuber07
    So a friend and I are doing a cross-country bike trip (from San Diego, CA to Savannah, GA) to raise money for an orphanage in Haiti that was destroyed in the recent earthquakes. We are working on getting companies to sponsor us, so I was wondering if anyone had done anything like this, and who they contacted. Also, we have never done anything this big, any advice? Thanks a lot!

    Start searching for grants. Also, get your local TV station and newspaper in on this. Make certain to set up a web site that does PayPal and keep a blog running on site of your progress - lots of pictures. Get a netbook (like an Asus or Acer) AND MAKE CERTAIN IT WORKS PROPERLY FOR YOU IN ALL ASPECTS BEFORE YOU LEAVE! Send out letters to TV stations along the way - especially in secondary cities where the news is kind of bland - this kind of local interest stuff is good for your awareness and donations. Do it in conjunction with your rest days.

    Some practical tips (no, I haven't ridden cross country, but these seem to be prudent).

    1) Camp along the way - the crazy guy on a bike web site has all kinds of useful information.

    2) Take every 6th, 7th, or 8th day off. And, stay at a hotel/motel for those two nights (the night you arrive, hang out the next day, then leave the next morning). This way you can wash out your bike clothes and regroup your stuff. Wash bike and drivetrain maintenance. Body recovery too - nutrition requirements are going to be immense. This way you can treat yourself to a steak dinner one night a week to get the benefit of the nutrients without having to deal with grinding through the digestive process on the bike the next day.

    2.5) During these down days make visits to local news or TV stations. Maybe show up the day of your departure at the TV station. Keep your stats - this is great material to share: calories burned (get a Garmin edge 705), elevation gain, miles travel, average speed. Learn to tell people about your bike - cleats, clipless pedals, and gears are always mysterious to people - learn to give a 30 to 45 description of this.

    3) Remember the US Postal Service. Look up general delivery and how it works. Also, Express Mail (the USPS FedEx-like service). There are more outlets of USPS than FedEx and you can have a care package awaiting there from your buddies in SD that are supporting you.

    4) Load up your cell phone with addresses of bicycle shops along the way for parts, support, etc.

    5) Make part of you journey through Colorado. Here's a route that will give you desert, mountains, plains, and permanent bragging rights:

    Cortez -> Durango -> Pagosa Springs -> Del Norte -> Alamosa -> Walsenburg ->La Junta -> Then to Dodge City, KS

    Big Climb over Wolf Creek Pass between Pagosa and Del Norte. Lots of empty space until you hit Alamosa (cross the Rio Grande River here - yeah it's more like a creek here in Colorado). Once you get east of Walsenburg it's all downhill to Kansas. Be certain to stop and look at Mesa Verde (Cliff Dwellings) and Sand Dunes. Look up the stonewall century, old routes for www.bicycletourcolorado.com and www.ridetherockies.com and search for pass information.

    6) Extra cell phone battery - have one charged up and ready to go. Also, you'll want to turn off your cell phone in the "big empty" between towns. As the signal weakens away from cellphone towers, the transmitter in the handset starts increasing power to find a signal. This is all well and good, but this increased transmission power will conk your battery out fast. Turn it off until you get within a few miles of a town.

    7) Remember I told you about the USPS? Well, you'll probably run into issues where you brought too much stuff. Identify that stuff and get a priority mail box and mail it home. The boxes are at the USPS and you can buy a small roll of packing tape there too. Or, talk nice and maybe they'll let you use the priority mail tape to seal the package.

    I envy you guys! You're going to have a great trip!

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