Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 31 of 31
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,194
    If you're interested in self supported rides check out these links.

    Great Lakes Randonneurs - Welcome

    https://rusa.org/cgi-bin/permsearch_PF.pl
    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Dunno truckman, I'd go within my capabilities, keep down the body weight, do full movements when kneeling and walking heads up and back straight, and stay limber on and off the bike. Old people tighten up. Their muscles lose elasticity and atrophy.

    I'm 75, hit with shoulder injuries on several occassions. The docs say exercise after surgery or things won't go back to normal. Couldn't lift my right arm up my back without intense pain in the shoulder for two years after taking a spill. Kept stretching it, and now it works great. Right knee injury from weightlifting lasted a couple of years riding, until I learned to spin. Now I can hop up steps without fear of throwing out the knee.

    The key: keep moving. How intensely doesn't matter. Go by feel. Listen to the body. Best to work within your capabilities, which in most cases are considerably above what an old man might feel. A Swiss doctor advised his 104 year old cyclist patient to roll back his 80+ mile a week schedule and do shorter rides with higher intensity intervals. His times got faster. He became "fitter."

    With me, the aches and pains of old age are the main deterrent to throwing on the jersey, pumping up the tires, and going on a ride. Once the ride starts, its just like old times. I practice my spin, easy as pie. Everything falls into rhythm and feeds body and soul, like Italian opera. The hardest part is simply getting out the door. Where I ride doesn't matter. I sure don't worry about riders who pass anymore. It used to be fun to try and stay with them. Once in a while I'll catch someone on the first climb. That's what 40 years in the saddle will do for ya once you get your spin down.

    The older I get, the more important it is to "stay on form," as the saying goes. Lose form and things start to fall apart. Tai chi, man. Keep an even strain. Smell the roses. It ain't over until the medics take that bike out of my cold dead hands!
    Truly thanks to you and all the other respondents for dealing with my whining out of sorts *****ing. Despite the 30degree temp and rain and sleet, I set out for a forty-miler which I completed without record time. But I really enjoyed watching the water arc off the front wheel, feeling the wind burn and knowing that I was doing something I really like. Tomorrow there is supposed to be 7 inches of snow so maybe no biking. But I did "stay on form";no slumping on to the headset; cadence to a pace where I was working; and confident in my selection of cold weather gear to endure whatever comes my way.

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    25,271
    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    What you are describing is partly a lack of exercise, but mostly a classic case of clinical depression. Talk to your doctor. There are many medications available.
    Have to say, my daughter has accused me of clinical depression when things got down, but there's nothing like a bike ride to wash it away. Best antidepressant in the world! Find a difficult climb and go for it. That did it for me every time.

    Come to think of it, bicycling became the antidote that got me through the most difficult period of my life, mentally and physically. Out there on the bike pumped up near anaerobic threshold, one can get some perspective on life problems and exercise some situational awareness. By the time the ride is finished, I know where I am and feel much better.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,524
    Sounds to me like, after many years and many miles, you have become bored with doing basically the same rides over and over again. I can relate. So a few years back I decided to set goals each year that were based on injecting some variety into my rides rather than just mindlessly racking up the miles. One year my goal was to ride over 1000 miles of non-redundant roads, so I had to plan my rides to seek out the roads I hadn't been on yet. Another year my goal was to ride every dirt road withing 25 miles from home, as there were over a hundred. This year my goal is to hit 50 different coffee stops on my rides. I haven't set my goal for 2019 yet, but I'm thinking of attacking every Strava segment within 25 miles of home.
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,883
    Quote Originally Posted by contract truckman View Post
    I tried a beginning to intermediate group that had more varied rides and social occasions. But as the group grew the leader excised the more intermediate riders.
    These rides can be fun too. I bring my mountain bike so I get more of a workout with the more sedate rides. If it's within riding distance from my house, well, I can always get a workout riding to the group ride and back.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,883
    Quote Originally Posted by contract truckman View Post
    Do you still think a shrink will get me in the pink?
    From my own experience, a good hard bike ride has more therapeutic value than any shrink. A shrink is good for self-discovery, but YOU ultimately have to solve your own issues in the end.

    I hear you about riding in city traffic - YUCK!! That's the nice thing about riding solo, you can choose your own routes. Or.....you can volunteer to lead rides for your club and make up some better routes for the riders. Being a ride leader is a great way to make new friends and participants really appreciate it. It's a great way to give back to your community and you feel good about it.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Tired of the same old/same old bike tours?
    By Mel Erickson in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-26-2015, 09:45 AM
  2. helmet heat dissipation
    By omg in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 06-27-2014, 01:02 PM
  3. Replies: 29
    Last Post: 09-26-2009, 05:05 AM
  4. Talk about same old, same old ......
    By Live Steam in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-20-2007, 01:58 PM
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-03-2005, 01:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.