Cyclist dies yesterday in head-on w/ another cyclist. Details sketchy.
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  1. #1
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    Cyclist dies yesterday in head-on w/ another cyclist.

    From TXBRA http://www.txbra.org/forum/forum.asp

    Cyclist dies at Plano crit course today (Sunday) posted by LAlton on
    8/14/2005 12:32:00 PM.

    We went to spin around the crit course today around 11:15. Plano police
    were on the north side of the course, two bikes were on the street. The
    said that two cyclists collided on the street head on with each other,
    one died, and one broke his arm and several other bones. They didn't
    know who either one of them were. There was a white honda civic with a
    United States Marine Corp bumper sticker on it parked at the course. The
    two bikes were:
    Trek 5500 dark grey with a Bend Oregon bike shop sticker on the seat
    tube
    Blue Fuji bike (he didn't let us look at it)
    They thought that at least one of them rode over since there was only
    one car, but that car might not even belong to either one of them. He
    thought maybe one of them was from Allen since the car was from Allen.
    They thought that maybe one guy was headed around like the normal crit
    races go, was on the wrong side of the street and had his head down, the
    other guy was riding opposite of the crit course and was on the right
    side, and they collided.
    That's really all he would tell us.
    Anybody know anyone that would have been over there? Weird...we go there
    because it's 'safe', nobody is over there, and two guys collide. No
    telling how long they laid there.
    Last edited by culdeus; 08-16-2005 at 06:34 AM.
    babyarm

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    Boy that's a real shame. I wonder how often THAT happens?

  3. #3
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    head on collisions with cyclists

    Quote Originally Posted by hawker12
    Boy that's a real shame. I wonder how often THAT happens?
    Around here the number of cyclists has increased about 10 fold since Lance's first win. Ten years ago, I could ride all day and not see another soul on a bike. This year they're all over the place. That's usually a good thing. But there are drawbacks.

    I've seen a lot of 'A$$ Clown' maneuvers such as cyclists going the wrong way on the road. The shoulders around here can't support two way traffic. I can't count the number of near head on collisions I've had the displeasure of experiencing this year. Two riders traveling in opposite directions at 20 mph with only helmets to protect them. Imagine the carnage. OUCH!
    are you having fun?...

  4. #4
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    By PAULA LAVIGNE / The Dallas Morning News

    A head-on collision between two bicyclists killed one man and injured another on a popular cycling route in southeast Plano.

    The Sunday morning crash had area cyclists buzzing Monday as they exchanged phone calls and posted messages on regional online cycling forums.

    Jim Hoyt, owner of Richardson Bike Mart, said he's never heard of a fatal head-on collision in his 50 years of cycling. "We can't figure it out."

    One cyclist, 52-year-old Michael Mahoney of Allen, was taken to Medical Center of Plano, where he died Sunday. The Collin County medical examiner's office would not release a cause of death Monday, but a family friend said he died of severe head trauma.

    The other cyclist, 37-year-old Jordan Muller of Richardson, was treated in the emergency room and released, a hospital spokeswoman said. Mr. Muller could not be reached Monday.

    Both were riding road bikes and were wearing helmets, police said.

    Nancy and Doug Clark have been friends of Mr. Mahoney and his wife, Nadine, for almost 25 years.

    Mr. Mahoney had worked for J.C. Penney since the late 1970s, and both families had been transferred, at different times, by the company from Wisconsin to North Texas.

    "He loved his family more than anything, and he had friends that are going to miss him forever," Mrs. Clark said. She said he had started cycling about four years ago after knee surgery forced him to give up running.

    On Sunday, he and Mr. Muller were cycling in opposite directions near Wyngate Boulevard and Wynwood Drive in an industrial section of southeast Plano, Plano police Officer Carl Duke said.

    Cyclists use the interconnecting streets as a circular route for timed races staged on Tuesday nights and sponsored by Plano Cycling & Fitness.

    Mr. Mahoney was cycling counterclockwise on the route and Mr. Muller was riding clockwise, and they hit head-on in the middle of the street.

    Race organizer Randy Eller said the races run clockwise, and most people who cycle the course for practice would be going clockwise. They probably wouldn't suspect someone coming from the other direction, he said. However, the course is a series of public streets, and cyclists can ride any direction they choose.

    "It's seldom you would see someone going counterclockwise. But it's not like [Mr. Mahoney] was doing anything wrong," Mr. Eller said. Mr. Eller said racing cyclists could reach speeds of more than 20 mph on the course, but police do not know how fast the two cyclists were going at the time of impact.

    Officer Duke said a passer-by called 911. Police are investigating the fatality as an accidental death and do not anticipate filing criminal charges, he said.

    Laura Alton, a Richardson cyclist who came across the crash scene Sunday, said she was surprised that the two collided on a straightaway where it was likely one cyclist would see another approaching.

    "I've just never heard of anybody hitting somebody head-on," she said. "If you're riding on a tour or a rally, you might have a crash, but not just head-on. Everybody's just kind of shocked by, 'Wow, how did this happen?' "

    Mrs. Clark said Mr. Mahoney had been cycling in the area before. He was training for the popular Hotter'N Hell Hundred ride in Wichita Falls on Aug. 27.

    "It was a big event for him to do the Hotter'N Hell," J.C. Penney co-worker and cyclist Craig Mathew said. "He really did live for it. I'd say, 'Are you going to do the whole thing? The whole hundred miles?' And he'd say, 'Yeah, yeah.' "

    Along with cycling, Mr. Mahoney also was an avid fisherman, NASCAR fan and motorcyclist, Mrs. Clark said. He and his wife had two adult children, Thomas Mahoney and Monica Spaulding.

    "He liked to do anything at least once," Mrs. Clark said. "He was never afraid of a challenge."

    The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Friday at St. Jude Catholic Church in Allen.
    babyarm

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    Mrs. Clark said Mr. Mahoney had been cycling in the area before. He was training for the popular Hotter'N Hell Hundred ride in Wichita Falls on Aug. 27.

    "It was a big event for him to do the Hotter'N Hell," J.C. Penney co-worker and cyclist Craig Mathew said. "He really did live for it. I'd say, 'Are you going to do the whole thing? The whole hundred miles?' And he'd say, 'Yeah, yeah.' "


    Man.
    babyarm

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    That's horrible.

    A road near my house has a bike lane going south, but not north, and a few people think the lane is for ALL bike traffic. Apparently the narrow width and frequent southward-pointing arrows aren't sufficient clues that it is a one-way bike lane (there is also the general law that says bikes must travel with car traffic). At least twice early this season I had near misses with these yahoos. One really freaked me out because I had my head down during an interval and didn't see the guy until we were right on each other. I was rounding a curve and because there was no car traffic happened to take the lane. If I had stayed in the bike lane, we might have clipped bars or had a complete head-on. I was not a happy guy.

  7. #7
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    Sad situation

    They must have both been looking down or expecting the other one to give. Not good.
    “To kill, you must know your enemy, and in this case my enemy is a varmint. And a varmint will never quit — ever. They’re like the Viet Cong — Varmint Cong. So you have to fall back on superior intelligence and superior firepower.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr meow meow View Post
    I can't count the number of near head on collisions I've had the displeasure of experiencing this year.
    Just had one myself last week, and it was 100% the other rider's fault for riding on the wrong side of the trail (he was on the far left of the path, I was on the far right) around a turn. This has gotten me to intensely examine my riding habits to see what I can do to avoid future accidents.

    I have come to believe there is nothing I could have done to prevent my previous head on crash: the other cyclist t-boned me at high speed - he took a left trying to enter a road when I had the right of way with no stop sign/light. Don't think I could have done anything about that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eniveld View Post
    Just had one myself last week, and it was 100% the other rider's fault for riding on the wrong side of the trail (he was on the far left of the path, I was on the far right) around a turn. This has gotten me to intensely examine my riding habits to see what I can do to avoid future accidents.

    I have come to believe there is nothing I could have done to prevent my previous head on crash: the other cyclist t-boned me at high speed - he took a left trying to enter a road when I had the right of way with no stop sign/light. Don't think I could have done anything about that.
    I thought that your Doctor told you to get off the computer?
    Too old to ride plastic

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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I thought that your Doctor told you to get off the computer?
    At least he's not out looking for pokemon.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by country cyclist View Post
    At least he's not out looking for pokemon.
    Might have been the cause of the crash.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eniveld View Post
    Just had one myself last week, and it was 100% the other rider's fault for riding on the wrong side of the trail (he was on the far left of the path, I was on the far right) around a turn. This has gotten me to intensely examine my riding habits to see what I can do to avoid future accidents.

    I have come to believe there is nothing I could have done to prevent my previous head on crash: the other cyclist t-boned me at high speed - he took a left trying to enter a road when I had the right of way with no stop sign/light. Don't think I could have done anything about that.
    You start a thread about your clueless bike path Strava activities, THEN you dig up an 11 year thread about a fatal bike path accident so you can talk about how you just did the same thing?

    You're pretty strange...
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

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