Deaf riders: Do you ride differently from hearing riders?
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    168

    Deaf riders: Do you ride differently from hearing riders?

    Do deaf and hearing impared cyclists ride differently? I would love to hear from you about how you think you might ride differently from your hearing brothers/sisters. I ask because I think any adaptations you may have made could be valuable for others. You possess a kind of wisdom we generally lack IMHO. It is also possible any adaptations may not be transferable, I know. Still, I ask

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,454
    I ride with one occasionally.
    He really dislikes other riders being too close to him especially when you surprise him.
    He says his sense of balance is not as good as somebody who is not hearing impaired.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    94
    I am far from being deaf but I do have some hearing loss and I do wear hearing aids most of the time. As I have posted in a different thread I don't wear the aids while riding my bike. I have been working on trying to be very aware of what is going on around me. There have been a number of times that if it wasn't for who I was riding with calling out about a car coming I would not have known it. I have been surprised a few times while riding by myself. When I'm on a high use road I tend to look over my shoulder quite a bit. This is probably a wise thing to do, hearing impaired or not.

    John

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    72
    I am completely deaf and have been riding all my life. I don't have any balance issues from being deaf. I tend to stick to less busy roads and ride on the very edge of the road. I also look over my shoulder a lot to see if anything is behind. I check how far the vehicle is and what speed they are traveling. That way I know when to check again to see if they are passing me at a safe distance. If there are a lot of intersections, it would mean more checking from behind to avoid surprises. I check less on long roads without intersections. I guess a deaf rider rides more defensively and more head turning to be completely aware of his or her surroundings.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BostonG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,812
    You guys ever try a mirror? It's not perfect (can't measure distance so well) but can be a great addition.

    mttklmrr1 (that took me 10 minutes to write, geez why not get a regular screen name ), you must have tried one, seeing as how you've been riding a long time.
    I ride mostly in the honorable pursuit of being kissed on both cheeks at the same time by one blond and one brunette. But not redheads, they scare me.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Rogus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    430
    I think a mirror is a safety necessity, but particularly for us hearing impaired cyclists. It helps cut down on all the head swiveling that needs to be done to compensate for having to look for what you can't hear. Solo riding is not as big of an issue as group riding. You kind of develope a new sense of what and who's around you, but you still miss out on any verbal warnings. MUTS are particularly bad because even with a mirror somebody can kind of sneak up on you. Every once is a while somebody will get mad because you don't react to their warning. After they pass you can tell they're mad about something, but I can't tell what they're yelling about.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: matfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    341
    I am not deaf, but am hearing impaired. I rarely hear vehicles approach, the lane is mine anyhow right?? I do use a mirror and watch it very closely. My aids do have a wind noise reduction circuit, that I have maxed out, but my brain does not have a wind noise or any background noise filter. When I take my aids out, my world gets blissfully quiet.
    People sleep peaceably at night because rough men and woman stand ready to do violence on their behalf. George Orwell

    Oregon Bike MS 2013 Team Matfam

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by BostonG View Post
    You guys ever try a mirror? It's not perfect (can't measure distance so well) but can be a great addition.

    mttklmrr1 (that took me 10 minutes to write, geez why not get a regular screen name ), you must have tried one, seeing as how you've been riding a long time.
    Ha! I couldn't think of a cool screen name when setting up this account. It seems not possible to change the user name without starting a new account.

    I have tried various of mirrors on handlebars, on helmet, and on glasses. They don't work unless you remain in one position. I change handlebar positions a lot. Sometimes I'm on the hoods, in drops, and sometimes rest my arms on handlebars. My head angle changes when I'm in aero position. There is too much fiddling to make them work.

    I have tried Ceverullum Hindsight 35 digital mirror. I currently have it on one of my bikes and it shows promise. The sun glare sometimes makes it difficult to see faraway objects and I still find myself turning my head to check what is behind. It works excellent when you are riding along cyclists. They are not a small blimp on the screen when they are riding up close. The developer is working on developing a better screen to resist glare. Deaf and hearing impaired cyclist should check this product.

    Home

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,100
    Quote Originally Posted by matfam View Post
    When I take my aids out, my world gets blissfully quiet.
    I would never wish for myself or anyone to be deaf or hearing impaired, but there are occasions in cafe's when I'd like to be able to turn down my hearing (or the voices of some group nearby). Doesn't bother me if someone is hearing impaired, but that rarely seems the reason for most loud folk.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.