Drink while riding
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  1. #1
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    Drink while riding

    I'm curious how people manage to find time to drink while riding at high speeding. I find it risky to go one-handed as every time I do that my handle bar would shake a bit and at 20 mph or higher, this feels pretty dangerous.

    is there such a thing as a handle bar mounted bottle holder? actually it seems so but would it solve my problem. I still have to lift it. anyone uses a straw or equivalent while road biking? is that ridiculous?

  2. #2
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    Not a good idea

    Quote Originally Posted by ansetou
    I'm curious how people manage to find time to drink while riding at high speeding. I find it risky to go one-handed as every time I do that my handle bar would shake a bit and at 20 mph or higher, this feels pretty dangerous.

    is there such a thing as a handle bar mounted bottle holder?
    I saw a photo on Interbike for that item. You are complaining about the stability issue with the handlebar at speed...the added weight of a water bottle swishing around on your stem/handlebar area is only going to make it worse.

    I grab/drink my bottle routinely while racing in crits. No big deal. Otherwise, god-forbid, use a camelback while you are riding your road bike.

  3. #3
    wim
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    Agree that riding one-handed is no big deal—if you learn how to do it and then keep on practicing it. Millions of bike riders have reached for downtube shifter billions of times without falling, so one-handed control is not difficult to learn. Actually, being able to perform some tasks with one hand at speed would make you a better and safer rider.

    But yes, there are handlebar mounts for your bottle. Back in the mid-1900s, that's where racers carried one or two corked aluminum bottles. Some drilled holes in the cork and inserted a drinking tube. The effect on steering is noticeable, but so small to be a non-issue. Photo shows Luxembourg racer Bim Diederich in 1951, back when bikes were steel and boobs were real. (sorry, Dave.)
    Last edited by wim; 09-28-2009 at 08:34 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ansetou
    I'm curious how people manage to find time to drink while riding at high speeding.

    Practice. If the bike really shakes whenever you take a hand off the bar you need to improve your handling skills. In the "old days" (about 15 years ago), you had to take a hand off to shift. You should be able to ride one-handed securely. Good road riders can sit up and ride no-handed for long stretches.

    One trick is to move the other hand (the one that's staying on the bar) near the center, right next to the stem. The shorter leverage reduces the tendency to shake. If you use your right hand for the bottle, move the left hand up top, then reach for the bottle.

    If you really can't solve this problem, you can use a camelback. But you really should woek on the bike handling. You'll be a safer rider.

  5. #5
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    and there's always the Camelbak.
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  6. #6
    Descender
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    You might want to make sure the front end of your bike is adjusted properly.

    Is the headset / steerer / top cap area tight?
    Stem tight?
    Check your front wheel bearings if adjustable?

    You really shouldn't have wobble or shakes at any speed

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia
    ...........
    One trick is to move the other hand (the one that's staying on the bar) near the center, right next to the stem. The shorter leverage reduces the tendency to shake. .......
    Exactly.

    Information like this is often missed in the "things you need to know" list.

  8. #8
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    The only drinking bottle I've seen with a straw is one that is mounted between aero bars. In the longer run your best bet is to learn to ride with one hand. It is a good skill to have, not just so you can drink from a water bottle on the move. Being able to do hand signals in traffic can help things go smoother with cars around. Just start out slowly at a pace you are comfortable with and work up the speed. I find I'm a bit more stable if I grip the top of the bar. Make sure you're not in a situation that requires you to have a hand near the brake. If the bike is shuddering with one hand you might have an issue with headset adjustment on the bike. More likely though you just need to learn to relax your grip and arm as you hold the handlebar.

  9. #9
    waterproof*
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    learn to ride one-handed... it's not really that hard.

    at speed, consider the time and place you choose to take a drink:
    - do you have a clear sight line of the road, to avoid obstacles?
    - are you at comfortable / reasonable distance from other riders, should you wobble a bit or have to brake suddenly?
    - do you really need a drink now, or if you wait a few minutes will there be a better spot?

    Addendum to hand position:
    - I use my left hand to get the bottle. So before drinking, I place my right hand on the top of the bars, with my thumb along the back of the bar, pointing at the stem, and my fingers curled around in a secure grip (but not deathgrip).
    - with practice, you can reach down, grab the bottle and bring it to your mouth, while keeping your eyes on the road.
    - with more practice, you can replace the bottle in the cage, while keeping eyes on the road.
    * not actually a Rock Star

  10. #10
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    Try drinking while in a tight pack, and have people bumping your bars.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY
    Try drinking while in a tight pack, and have people bumping your bars.
    I remember a stage of the Giro d'Italia a few years ago, when Paolo "Il Falco" Savoldelli was making up time on a descent. Flying down a narrow, twisty road, going through villages with stone-walled houses right up against the road, going 50-60 mph, he was not only drinking frequently, he was taking food out of his jersey pockets, unwrapping it and eating. Made it look easy - but terrifying to watch.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    and there's always the Camelbak.
    A Camelbak is fine, but learning to ride one-handed is a necessary skill. Don't trade one for the other.

  13. #13
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    It's much easier if you master the "no look" drink. Don't look down to find your water bottle. You know where it is. Keep your eyes on the road & feel for it. don't look at it when drinking either. You already know where your mouth is. Keep your eyes on the road when you replace it in the bottle cage as well. My suggestion is to go to a big empty parking lot and practice doing this. When you can do it smoothly, try it on your next group ride when you're not real close to anybody.

    Practice makes better.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  14. #14
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    Bike really shouldn't wobble at 20mph so ditto the others advice to look at that. Try clamping the top tube with your knees until you figure out why it's wobbling.

    Another thing to also consider is when riding one handed is to hold the bar on the flat close to the stem. I forgot where I first read this but it's particularly useful when you look over your shoulder (like when making a left). Supposedly the bike "wanders" less. I think it's because you have less leverage when holding close to the stem like that so the bike tends to track straight. Anyway, give it a shot, maybe it will help.

  15. #15
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    This might sound dumb, but I had a hard time getting the hang of it last year when I started riding again. After spending the winter on the trainer (and purposely not looking at it while grabbing it and putting it back), it's a lot easier now. When I got back outside again this spring, there was one less part to learning how to do it while riding. Worked for me anyway...

  16. #16
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    Practice like others have said and moving the remaining hand close to the stem.
    Also a cage that allows easy removal and reinsertion is very nice. The Andrew's King Cage works great for this and with practice you can remove and reinsert bottle without taking your eyes off the bike 'action'.
    John Lapoint / San Diego
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  17. #17
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    Just remember, years ago riders had to reach for down by the bottle cages every time they wanted to shift. I second the advice about moving the hand on the bar closer to the stem.

  18. #18
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