Finding motivation to ride
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  1. #1
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    Finding motivation to ride

    Anyone have tips on finding motivation to ride. Been working 2 jobs since April and my cycling has suffered tremendously. As a result I have put on some weight, and been feeling kind of humdrum and exhausted. I've been to the Dr and everything checks out ok, except for my testosterone, which is low. So a trip to the Urologist will be scheduled soon. I'll be 43 next month and need to find my mojo and passion for riding again. Any help would be appreciated.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  2. #2
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    If you are working two jobs, you are obviously stressed unless they are both part time jobs. Do you really need two jobs to make ends meet?

    Low T at 43 years old? Might that have to do with the extra weight you are putting on or extra stress? Is your weight really excessive?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  3. #3
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    I work one full time, one part time. The part time job is at a Trek store, so it's not hard, but it still is work. My full time job is with Ikea at a distribution center, so it's physical.

    Weight is at 230, I'm 6'1, but I've been fairly athletic all my life so my weight has been around 185-190. The past 3 years I've put on about 40 lbs.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  4. #4
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    You’ve earned the right to feel worn out. I can only speak for myself, but here’s something that has worked: When I’m tired of riding the same old routes with the same old hills, I load my bike in the car and go somewhere new, take a sightseeing ride w/o pushing the pace.

    BTW, I’m 65 and I’m on T replacement using a topical gel. My observations:

    Takes 10 to 15 years off the age of my muscles. (No, I’ve never raced and I don’t plan to.)
    Takes 5 to 10 years off the age of my privates.
    Takes 0 years off the age of my joints.
    Costly, as in a few $ per day, even with a discount from GoodRX.com.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobf View Post
    You’ve earned the right to feel worn out. I can only speak for myself, but here’s something that has worked: When I’m tired of riding the same old routes with the same old hills, I load my bike in the car and go somewhere new, take a sightseeing ride w/o pushing the pace.

    BTW, I’m 65 and I’m on T replacement using a topical gel. My observations:

    Takes 10 to 15 years off the age of my muscles. (No, I’ve never raced and I don’t plan to.)
    Takes 5 to 10 years off the age of my privates.
    Takes 0 years off the age of my joints.
    Costly, as in a few $ per day, even with a discount from GoodRX.com.

    I guess my biggest problem is even wanting to ride. I do want to ride, but the real desire that I had last year is not there.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  6. #6
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    I retired from the military after 26 years of institutionalization last October. That last year and the months afterwards were very stressful for me as I adjusted to a new career and the new circumstances I found myself in. I moved from a semi-sedentary desk job to a very active and more physically demanding one, and my availble riding time decreased significantly. All of my races were wiped off the calendar by work-related travel.

    Yeah, I gained 20 lbs and lost a lot of fitness pretty quickly.

    Because of this, I was less inclined to "train", which became a vicious cycle. I'd ride my trainer most every day (road miles weren't an option), but there wasn't any real motivation behind it. Junk trainer miles.

    I started eating more.

    My mood took a dive.

    Now I'm digging myself out of the hole. I've tried to re-frame riding and what I expect from it. I'm not ready to slap wool and panniers on and start quoting Grant Petersen quite yet, but I'm looking for more than "performance"- which is good, because performance isn't answering my calls anymore.

    Before you get into any sort of serious supplementation, eliminate fatigue, diet, and any sort of lifestyle causation for low T. I am high-normal in testosterone (as of last spring), and I still feel ground into the dirt a lot of the time. With a solid training block, I could probably push my T numbers down to "low"- it's variable. In other words, don't start at such a young age unless you absolutely have to.

    Ride because it's fun. Ride because it makes you a better person. Ride for the endorphin high. Ride because you want to.

    It's not an obligation.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post
    I retired from the military after 26 years of institutionalization last October. That last year and the months afterwards were very stressful for me as I adjusted to a new career and the new circumstances I found myself in. I moved from a semi-sedentary desk job to a very active and more physically demanding one, and my availble riding time decreased significantly. All of my races were wiped off the calendar by work-related travel.

    Yeah, I gained 20 lbs and lost a lot of fitness pretty quickly.

    Because of this, I was less inclined to "train", which became a vicious cycle. I'd ride my trainer most every day (road miles weren't an option), but there wasn't any real motivation behind it. Junk trainer miles.

    I started eating more.

    My mood took a dive.

    Now I'm digging myself out of the hole. I've tried to re-frame riding and what I expect from it. I'm not ready to slap wool and panniers on and start quoting Grant Petersen quite yet, but I'm looking for more than "performance"- which is good, because performance isn't answering my calls anymore.

    Before you get into any sort of serious supplementation, eliminate fatigue, diet, and any sort of lifestyle causation for low T. I am high-normal in testosterone (as of last spring), and I still feel ground into the dirt a lot of the time. With a solid training block, I could probably push my T numbers down to "low"- it's variable. In other words, don't start at such a young age unless you absolutely have to.

    Ride because it's fun. Ride because it makes you a better person. Ride for the endorphin high. Ride because you want to.

    It's not an obligation.


    I've changed my diet, more fresh foods, lots of chicken and veggies, salads. Very little junk food. Caloric intake is around 2500 per day, which is a good intake level for the type of work I'm in - very physical - according to a couple of Calorie counters I've used for weight loss. I've tried closer to 2000, but ran into dizzy spells and nausea. Don't drink alcohol that much.

    But when I say my T is low, it's really low. My last T test was IIRC 301. Bottom of the FDA normal range. Even my Dr says its low.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  8. #8
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    High stress (working 2 jobs and not getting enough rest) can cause low T, due in part to high Cortisol, the stress hormone. Low T can cause weight gain and lack of energy / motivation. Might want to see an Endocrinologist to better understand what is going on.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    High stress (working 2 jobs and not getting enough rest) can cause low T, due in part to high Cortisol, the stress hormone. Low T can cause weight gain and lack of energy / motivation. Might want to see an Endocrinologist to better understand what is going on.
    That's the plan.

    Thanks everyone
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    High stress (working 2 jobs and not getting enough rest) can cause low T, due in part to high Cortisol, the stress hormone. Low T can cause weight gain and lack of energy / motivation. Might want to see an Endocrinologist to better understand what is going on.
    High stress and not getting enough rest can cause other health problems besides low T. Immune system is suppressed, so you will get sick more often. Anxiety and depression are more common too.

    If you have a physically demanding job, it's easy to see why you are less motivated to do something physically strenuous during off hours. When I had a sit-down job that was particularly mentally stressful, I found therapy in a good hard bike ride after work.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    The past 3 years I've put on about 40 lbs.
    I can't think of anything to be more motivating than that to ride, or change/do something.

    Maybe try a different type or riding if you were only doing one type before. Trails are real fun if you have any of those around.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I can't think of anything to be more motivating than that to ride, or change/do something.
    It's a vicious cycle. Stress makes you put on weight. Extra weight makes you tired. Imagine carrying a 40lb. backpack from the time you get out of bed in the morning until the time you get in bed at night.

    And with the addition of that kind of weight comes the risk of type 2 diabetes.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #13
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    Unless you need the money, quit the part time job. Ride bikes, don't work with them. If you need the job look for a different one, maybe, just maybe, working around bikes removes any interest in riding them. 'Specially when you've already put in 40hrs at the 1st job.

    I've heard it said, don't turn your hobby into your job.
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #14
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    Set some goals for yourself. Something realistic, like x,000 miles before year-end. Track your progress. Find new roads to ride.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Unless you need the money, quit the part time job. Ride bikes, don't work with them. If you need the job look for a different one, maybe, just maybe, working around bikes removes any interest in riding them. 'Specially when you've already put in 40hrs at the 1st job.

    I've heard it said, don't turn your hobby into your job.
    This. If you can cut back on expenses, quit the second job. You money or your freedom, choose your freedom. In some ways, it's your money or your life.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    I've changed my diet, more fresh foods, lots of chicken and veggies, salads. Very little junk food. Caloric intake is around 2500 per day, which is a good intake level for the type of work I'm in - very physical - according to a couple of Calorie counters I've used for weight loss. I've tried closer to 2000, but ran into dizzy spells and nausea. Don't drink alcohol that much.

    But when I say my T is low, it's really low. My last T test was IIRC 301. Bottom of the FDA normal range. Even my Dr says its low.
    Congrats on straightening out the diet. I wish I was as strong as you are.

    I can't make financial or health decisions for you, any more than you can make them for me. But at your age, you shouldn't be feeling that "off".

    Sometimes, for me at least, all it takes is one blue sky, mild temperature bike ride for everything to fall into place. When I'm at a low point, I push out for every ride with the hope that this will be "that one". Even if it isn't, 99.9% of the time I'm better off for having ridden.

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    You gained 40#, pick up a 20 propane tank. Full that is around 35#s, think of carrying that around all day and night. That worked for me.

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    Hmm..... you work two jobs, one of them is at a Trek Store. Maybe it's time to get your Trek Ninja status and treat yourself to a new ride? Nothing wrong if that what it takes to motivate you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    Anyone have tips on finding motivation to ride. Been working 2 jobs since April and my cycling has suffered tremendously. As a result I have put on some weight, and been feeling kind of humdrum and exhausted. I've been to the Dr and everything checks out ok, except for my testosterone, which is low. So a trip to the Urologist will be scheduled soon. I'll be 43 next month and need to find my mojo and passion for riding again. Any help would be appreciated.
    I wish there was a magic formula for this because I think we all lose motivation from time to time. As others have noted you may just be run down from 2 jobs. A few other things that are usually suggested are:
    1. Change the type of riding you do (off road, trails, etc)
    2. Sign up for a harder ride and work towards it
    3. Find other folks to ride with. Set times to meet and ride
    4. Take a break
    Last edited by DaveG; 07-22-2019 at 05:05 AM.

  20. #20
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    There is a magic formula. As ogre said if you can afford it buy a new bike. If you work at a trek store perfect buy a madone or emonda. I have a madone and avg 80-100 miles a week. Part of my motivation is due to how fun it is to have a sweet ride.


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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by leadout_kv View Post
    There is a magic formula. As ogre said if you can afford it buy a new bike. If you work at a trek store perfect buy a madone or emonda. I have a madone and avg 80-100 miles a week. Part of my motivation is due to how fun it is to have a sweet ride.
    He works two jobs. I doubt he can afford to buy a new bike. If he can, that is good reason to quit the one job so he can ride more.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #22
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    Would absolutely love a new bike, but it's not in the cards this year or probably even next year. If I could get away with working one job, life would be so much easier, but with the wife out of work, bills and child support, 2 jobs is like barely holding on right now.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  23. #23
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    Are you able to ride your bike to your job(s)? It's a great way to get in extra miles. Depending on how far your commute is, often riding only takes an extra 20-30min. Reduces the stress of driving in traffic. Saves gas can car costs.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Are you able to ride your bike to your job(s)? It's a great way to get in extra miles. Depending on how far your commute is, often riding only takes an extra 20-30min. Reduces the stress of driving in traffic. Saves gas can car costs.
    Any traffic that is stressful to drive in is stressful to ride a bike in. City traffic sucks whether on a bike or in a car. IMO, the only practical way to commute into large cities is walking or public transit.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #25
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    Riding to the Trek store could be an option on some days. But to my full time job it would be a problem. I start work at 5 am and there is no place to store my bike indoors. And I am not leaving a 4k road bike outside.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

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