The first 50mm setback seatpost I’ve seen - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    My buddy lives in another country. He mentioned that his had broken but gave no details. I assumed it was the seat clamp but know now it was the post itself.

    Looks like you're set on this carbon seatpost. Best of luck. If anyone else wants to buy something similar I hope they read this thread first and keep it in mind.

  2. #27
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    I think the important point to make here is that name brand products are made to a spec. When you buy an off-brand product, you don't know what you are getting. Some of these off-brand carbon products are known to contain voids in the carbon.

    Futhermore, how much weight savings and vibration dampening do you expect from a carbon vs. alloy seatpost anyway? I know I can't tell a difference.

    Hummina, do me a favor. If you are going to continue to ride on these cheap carbon components, could you take out a good life insurance policy and make me your beneficiary?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  3. #28
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    Here's my misadventure with a carbon post:

    https://forums.roadbikereview.com/ge...ay-336838.html

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I think the important point to make here is that name brand products are made to a spec. When you buy an off-brand product, you don't know what you are getting. Some of these off-brand carbon products are known to contain voids in the carbon.

    Futhermore, how much weight savings and vibration dampening do you expect from a carbon vs. alloy seatpost anyway? I know I can't tell a difference.

    Hummina, do me a favor. If you are going to continue to ride on these cheap carbon components, could you take out a good life insurance policy and make me your beneficiary?
    Lombard, you keep implying the OP is risking life with his potential choice in seat post. I drew attention to one of your prior fear mongering posts to which I don't think you ever replied. How exactly is a broken seat post so life threatening? And how is a broken seat post as much or more serious than let's say a broken fork, stem, handlebar, ...?

    I'm not a big fan of Chinese or grey market parts in general and have none to which I'm aware on any of my bikes, and I would be in absolute full agreement with you if we were talking of Chinese or grey market items like forks, stems, bars, cranks, pedals, chains, which when they fail have a very high probability of serious injury. However, the OP is talking about a seat post. I have had at least 3 seat posts (all name brand top shelf US made) suddenly fail, and know a number of others who have also broken posts. Though the jagged end is close to family jewels, there has been plenty of warning to raise your butt out of danger. While I'd rather not have any parts fail, I'd happily deal with a broken post or seat anytime over that of a broken fork, stem or bar.

    What remains lost in this thread is that a 50mm setback post regardless of make one wonder whether the OP has a suitably sized frame.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by RHankey View Post
    Lombard, you keep implying the OP is risking life with his potential choice in seat post. I drew attention to one of your prior fear mongering posts to which I don't think you ever replied. How exactly is a broken seat post so life threatening? And how is a broken seat post as much or more serious than let's say a broken fork, stem, handlebar, ...?

    I'm not a big fan of Chinese or grey market parts in general and have none to which I'm aware on any of my bikes, and I would be in absolute full agreement with you if we were talking of Chinese or grey market items like forks, stems, bars, cranks, pedals, chains, which when they fail have a very high probability of serious injury. However, the OP is talking about a seat post. I have had at least 3 seat posts (all name brand top shelf US made) suddenly fail, and know a number of others who have also broken posts. Though the jagged end is close to family jewels, there has been plenty of warning to raise your butt out of danger. While I'd rather not have any parts fail, I'd happily deal with a broken post or seat anytime over that of a broken fork, stem or bar.

    What remains lost in this thread is that a 50mm setback post regardless of make one wonder whether the OP has a suitably sized frame.
    While your point is valid that a broken seatpost may not be as dangerous as a broken fork, stem or handlebars, it may still cause you to lose control and crash. Go back and read Carlos' post #24 and he was only on a trainer!

    And I have to wonder why you are breaking so many seatposts. Are you riding with the saddle slammed to either extreme on the rails? How much do you weigh? Did you torque these correctly?

    My point is why take the risk just to save a little money.

    As far as needing a 50mm setback post in order to get a proper fit, well yes, this leads me to believe the OP is riding with the wrong size frame.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    And I have to wonder why you are breaking so many seatposts. Are you riding with the saddle slammed to either extreme on the rails? How much do you weigh? Did you torque these correctly?.
    I weigh ~150lb, and for the failed posts, seats were centered over no setback post clamps and the post bolts were torqued (with torque wrench) to the manufactures specs. Of the three failures I most clearly remember, all were Ti or Al post with Al clamps from a very highly touted US made component maker of the time. Two broke while mtn biking at high speed in rather rugged terrain, where it's sometimes unavoidable to have your butt slam into the seat. The third broke on a road bike during a hard in saddle hill climb for which the seat nor post had ever been subjected to any notable prior stress or impacts. All 3 broke in the seat clamp and were warranted by the manufacturer as unquestionable manufacturing defects. By the time I broke the second one, the manufacturer had discontinued selling the post due to too many failures. I have had other failures with specialty posts, but I don't recall the specific details well enough to elaborate as they are going back a while.

    For what is such a seemingly simple component, there have been an awful lot of seat posts on the market from even the big reputable names having less than optimal designs, such as: Clamps that are prone to slip or break; Clamps that do not distribute the clamping force sufficiently over the seat rails; Insufficient strength in setback posts, to name but a few problems, Difficulty to adjust seat tilt; Posts that aren't strong enough relative to their length and amount of setback; etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    My point is why take the risk just to save a little money.
    I probably wouldn't have spoken up if you had simply said that from the get go. I say probably, as risk of component failure does not necessarily mean risk to rider. While seat post failure is a memorable event and conjures up images of what could have happened, I've heard precious few for whom it has resulted in serious injury. We likely take far greater risks to our safety simply riding our bikes on public roads. Conversely, broken forks, stems, bars have a pretty high risk of serious injury. So, repeatedly suggesting one should get a life insurance policy over their choice of seat post was arguably a tad mellow dramatic.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Do you understand basic tenents of fit? How reach is derived...through setback, top tube and stem length? Why seat tube angle matters? Why saddle setback matters? Why too much setback is problematic to rotating one's pelvis? Why riding too much setback changes the bike's weight distribution and puts more weight on the rear wheel adversely affecting handling?

    You chose the bike with top tube length and sta. Do you know why its almost impossible to find a seat post with more than 35mm setback in the industry?

    I just want to see if you know what you are doing. So far, doesn't seem like it. Its not like the bike you chose is high end. You can flip it on Craigslist or give it to a friend and buy a bike that fits you properly.
    THIS^^

    YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG.

    I used to be a setback connoisseur lamenting all sort of ill fitting frames and components. Then I got a fit. Now I am more comfortable, in a more aggressive position and instead of pushing at the crank, my legs fall like pistons. You do not need a 50mm setback post.

    I also stopped snapping spokes and complaining about wheels. I was sitting so far back that my bike would wheelie on a 9-11% incline with moderate effort on lowest gear. It was crazy and the craziest part was that I was certain that I had it all figured out.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  8. #33
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    People are too quick toassume the worst of unbranded China stuff. It’s a big country with lots of different stuff.


    ironically maybe it’s the brand name post that is more suspect at least in this case as the post I got is on ebay with many reviews and you can pay by PayPal which has a lot of insurance besides the policy offered by the seller.


    we could easily do some kind of strength comparison by cutting the last couple inches off some posts and stress testing them.

    I got a couple unbranded frames like twelve years ago and it was even cheaper then at I think 350$ a frame. They had every bell and whistle and something compatible wasn’t even available in this country or if it was it would be maybe, literally,10x more expensive.
    Last edited by hummina shadeeba; 12-14-2018 at 08:40 PM.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by RHankey View Post
    I weigh ~150lb, and for the failed posts, seats were centered over no setback post clamps and the post bolts were torqued (with torque wrench) to the manufactures specs. Of the three failures I most clearly remember, all were Ti or Al post with Al clamps from a very highly touted US made component maker of the time. Two broke while mtn biking at high speed in rather rugged terrain, where it's sometimes unavoidable to have your butt slam into the seat. The third broke on a road bike during a hard in saddle hill climb for which the seat nor post had ever been subjected to any notable prior stress or impacts. All 3 broke in the seat clamp and were warranted by the manufacturer as unquestionable manufacturing defects. By the time I broke the second one, the manufacturer had discontinued selling the post due to too many failures. I have had other failures with specialty posts, but I don't recall the specific details well enough to elaborate as they are going back a while.

    For what is such a seemingly simple component, there have been an awful lot of seat posts on the market from even the big reputable names having less than optimal designs, such as: Clamps that are prone to slip or break; Clamps that do not distribute the clamping force sufficiently over the seat rails; Insufficient strength in setback posts, to name but a few problems, Difficulty to adjust seat tilt; Posts that aren't strong enough relative to their length and amount of setback; etc.


    I probably wouldn't have spoken up if you had simply said that from the get go. I say probably, as risk of component failure does not necessarily mean risk to rider. While seat post failure is a memorable event and conjures up images of what could have happened, I've heard precious few for whom it has resulted in serious injury. We likely take far greater risks to our safety simply riding our bikes on public roads. Conversely, broken forks, stems, bars have a pretty high risk of serious injury. So, repeatedly suggesting one should get a life insurance policy over their choice of seat post was arguably a tad mellow dramatic.
    I still have to wonder what is going on that you break so many seatposts. Were they the same post or brand, or were they all different brands? You didn't state the brand.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #35
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    That seatpost is going to snap at the maximum stress point. Just under the seat clamp area where curvature is greatest. There simply isn't enough material there to reinforce it. The snap will be sudden and most likely happen when you're sitting up with most weight on the rear, probably taking a drink with one hand off the bars and unbalanced anyway. It'll be a low-speed crash but you will crash. Won't kill yourself but a shoulder separation or cracked ribs will be a likely outcome.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post

    My point is why take the risk just to save a little money.
    Cost versus risk means different things to different people, also what's "little money" to one could easily be "big money" to another.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Cost versus risk means different things to different people, also what's "little money" to one could easily be "big money" to another.
    Let's see:

    Cheap carbon seatpost: $44
    Good quality alloy seatpost: $30

    No further explanation necessary.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Let's see:

    Cheap carbon seatpost: $44
    Good quality alloy seatpost: $30

    No further explanation necessary.
    Comparing a cheap carbon long setback to an aluminum long setback.

    Cheap carbon: $44
    Aluminum: $55

    apples to apples

    https://velo-orange.com/collections/...t-long-setback

    I just realized that the aluminum seatpost I linked to is only 30mm setback so I found this 40mm setback.

    steel: $160

    https://www.rivbike.com/collections/...-2-x-250-11048
    Last edited by velodog; 12-12-2018 at 02:50 PM. Reason: additional information
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Comparing a cheap carbon long setback to an aluminum long setback.

    Cheap carbon: $44
    Aluminum: $55

    apples to apples

    https://velo-orange.com/collections/...t-long-setback

    I just realized that the aluminum seatpost I linked to is only 30mm setback so I found this 40mm setback.

    steel: $160

    https://www.rivbike.com/collections/...-2-x-250-11048
    Personally, I think spending $160 on a seatpost is crazy, but buying cheap carbon is even crazier.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #40
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    roadbikereview forum will continue on the same endless bull of I think you think, talking about an unknown post getting nowhere on something that could easily be proven one way or the other. I put the challenge out to all carbon seatpost owners, you give me the two inch end of your post and we'll have a show down in some to be determined test. its a waste of time to talk about it.

    spending 160 on a post is a great idea if you have too much money.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Personally, I think spending $160 on a seatpost is crazy, but buying cheap carbon is even crazier.
    The thing is, we all get to make our own choices.
    Too old to ride plastic

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The thing is, we all get to make our own choices.
    Very true. But I can still have my opinions. And you know what they say about opinions.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #43
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    I bet Steve Bauer could have used a 50mm setback seatpost, if not more.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]32436bauer_93_roubaix.jpg1[/ATTACH]

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogre View Post
    I bet Steve Bauer could have used a 50mm setback seatpost, if not more.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]32436bauer_93_roubaix.jpg1[/ATTACH]
    Steve Bauer rides his custom Eddy Merckx machine for the first of what would only be two race outings, this one in the 1993 Ghent-Wevelgem semi-classic.

    The second and final race for this unusual machine was the '93 Paris-Roubaix, with Rock Shox front suspension added to the mix. Designed by Richard Dejonkheere (elder brother of ex-pro and Motorola DS Noel), it was ridden in training by Bauer for five months before he felt used to it. In Paris-Roubaix he used 180mm cranks, and the lip on the saddle was necessary to keep him on the saddle. He finished 21st and, on balance, decided that the advantages were outweighed by the disadvantages - poor standing climbing, and he felt that positioning in the bunch was negatively affected, as he was sitting back further and lower than other riders. He did like the descending abilities - in a slippery Ghent-Wevelgem he carved up Johan Capiot only minutes after the Belgian had been mocking his "chopper". According to my information, the seat tube was 60 degrees - the head tube isn't stated, but it looks 70 or 71 degrees to me...

    From ROADWORKS REPARTO CORSE: Old Days - Part Five
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  20. #45
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    But why poor standing climbing? The saddle is so far out of the way. Maybe the relaxed front angle is the problem for climbing. Not the leverage on the front maybe.
    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/kops.html



    Great find. Those chainstays are huge. I forget who it was, some climbing pro, he had a custom frame with a bent seattube so could get the rear wheel closer. Why would that help?
    Last edited by hummina shadeeba; 12-13-2018 at 11:51 AM.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I still have to wonder what is going on that you break so many seatposts. Were they the same post or brand, or were they all different brands? You didn't state the brand.
    The three posts to which I specifically described were all from the same manufacturer. There is nothing to be gained by stating the manufacturer name publically, as the company is no longer in business, it has no relevance to the OP's original question, and the company was very good at standing behind their product with warranty replacements. That company garnered plenty of industry bad press for their posts in the months and years following my failures for what was clearly a design mistake. I had their posts on 4 or 5 of my main rides at the time and all broke within about a 6 month time span. I was logging extremely high miles/year in those times and in effect was providing them an accelerated test bed, and encountered the failures well before it became a prevalent problem for others. By the second failure, I started switching to a different brand, but not fast enough to prevent the 3rd failure. I never used the last 2 warranty replacements.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by RHankey View Post
    The three posts to which I specifically described were all from the same manufacturer. There is nothing to be gained by stating the manufacturer name publically, as the company is no longer in business, it has no relevance to the OP's original question, and the company was very good at standing behind their product with warranty replacements. That company garnered plenty of industry bad press for their posts in the months and years following my failures for what was clearly a design mistake. I had their posts on 4 or 5 of my main rides at the time and all broke within about a 6 month time span. I was logging extremely high miles/year in those times and in effect was providing them an accelerated test bed, and encountered the failures well before it became a prevalent problem for others. By the second failure, I started switching to a different brand, but not fast enough to prevent the 3rd failure. I never used the last 2 warranty replacements.
    What do you have to hide by not stating the manufacterer? Why the secrecy?

    And what made you keep using the same brand? I think after the first one failed, I would have shunned that brand after that. You do know that old definition of insanity, don't you?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    What do you have to hide by not stating the manufacterer? Why the secrecy?

    And what made you keep using the same brand? I think after the first one failed, I would have shunned that brand after that. You do know that old definition of insanity, don't you?
    You should read his post again as he stated that he had those seatposts in a number of bikes and was switching them out. The cash outlay for 4\5 posts can get spendy and spreading out the cost over time, one post at a time, can be a little easier on the pocketbook.

    There's a difference between insane and thrifty.
    Too old to ride plastic

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    What do you have to hide by not stating the manufacterer? Why the secrecy??
    I've made it very clear why the name of the manufacturer is irrelevant in this thread and at this point in time. Give it a rest.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    And what made you keep using the same brand? I think after the first one failed, I would have shunned that brand after that. You do know that old definition of insanity, don't you?
    Not all of us less sane than you forum members Lombard have infinite money to throw at parts, which in my case can get quite expensive given the large stable of heavily used bikes to keep going in good workable order. After all, I have to spend much of my income on sanity meds and padded cells. And nor is it necessarily reasonable to write an entire company of products off for a single mistake or failure. I highly doubt you do either. The company in question actually had many other very highly regarded products, some of which remain to this day on some of my retired bikes. In this case, it was just their posts that had issues.

    The first failure does not prove much of anything. The failure could have been a result of poor design, defect in the one post, installation error, using the product beyond what it is was designed for, among any number of other causes. With the second identical failure, I stopped installing any more of their posts, and started replacing those that were still in service. Four or five of my active bikes had the posts. By that point, I was also starting to see/hear others having problems with the same model post too which made the decision a little easier to make. Had it been something like a fork, stem or bar, I would have been much more proactive in replacement strategy. A seat post failure is more an inconvenience.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by RHankey View Post
    I've made it very clear why the name of the manufacturer is irrelevant in this thread and at this point in time. Give it a rest.


    Not all of us less sane than you forum members Lombard have infinite money to throw at parts, which in my case can get quite expensive given the large stable of heavily used bikes to keep going in good workable order. After all, I have to spend much of my income on sanity meds and padded cells. And nor is it necessarily reasonable to write an entire company of products off for a single mistake or failure. I highly doubt you do either. The company in question actually had many other very highly regarded products, some of which remain to this day on some of my retired bikes. In this case, it was just their posts that had issues.

    The first failure does not prove much of anything. The failure could have been a result of poor design, defect in the one post, installation error, using the product beyond what it is was designed for, among any number of other causes. With the second identical failure, I stopped installing any more of their posts, and started replacing those that were still in service. Four or five of my active bikes had the posts. By that point, I was also starting to see/hear others having problems with the same model post too which made the decision a little easier to make. Had it been something like a fork, stem or bar, I would have been much more proactive in replacement strategy. A seat post failure is more an inconvenience.
    So let me get this straight. You start an argument based on incomplete anecdotes. You won't name the manufacterer because you claim that information is irrelevant. That's like someone saying "I heard some reliable information, but I won't reveal my source." I ask again, what are you hiding and why the secrecy? Something smells here. No, I won't give it a rest because it IS relevant to this discussion.

    And no, I don't have infinite money to throw at parts or bikes for that matter. But going for the lowest common denominator isn't always prudent. There is a saying that goes "Buy cheap, buy twice". So you didn't save a whole lot of money with those seatposts, did you?

    And no, I never said you won't have bad name brand products. But a known reputable brand has more to lose if they turn out a dangerous product.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



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