Good road cycling hydration pack? - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    I have a pack made my North Face. The water bladder is by Nalgene.

    High quality, not too big, just enough cargo space for essentials.

    I find I am more likely to stay hydrated if I wear a water pack than if I rely on bottles.

    You risk a Roadie Inquisition, though. Blasphemy!

  2. #27
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    +1 for the camelback rogue. I know the bottle crowd is pounding their fists right now, but coming from the mtb world I find a pack indespensible. My opinion (and it's only an opinion) is carrying multiple bottles on the frame, seatbags, clothes wrapped around your waist or up under your jersey, food, wallet, keys and more bottles stuffed into overstuffed pockets antiquated, it kinda looks like lumpy pooped diaper. They make sleeker models but the rogue for me is just right for carrying the bare essentials. I carry two spare tubes, a bike multitool, sometimes a house key, a cell phone for emergency, some food for longer rides, and something to put on when the temp drops. The disadvantages are your back will sweat, and to access anything you have to stop and get off (admittedly the old method has its merits), but you won't inadvertantly drop something roadside. You don't need to fill the bladder to the top, only what you think you're gonna drink. I hate running out of water (actually I drink gatorade) on a hot ride when you're on the outskirts where there is no place to refill, then what?

  3. #28
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    Heck, if you need to carry that much, get a bakfeits!



  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FR hokeypokey
    I like using a camelback even on the road bike. Rode mtb long before road and find the bag on the back more comfortable and fits my use and function better. My Camelbak (Rocket?) is several years old and still works xlnt for me. It is smaller and sleeker in design than most mtb bags. I have seen more brands and models that would work well on the road though. Due to wear, I am in the hunt for new one.

    Has enough room for 70oz of water, all my mechanical and personal "stuff" and extra room for extra gloves, light jacket or misc when needed. Personally, I have never liked bike bags, attaching pumps or stuffing my pockets. I like having the bike clean and unencumbered. Just a personal taste for road and mtb alike.

    I have that very one and while i use it mainly for MTB i wouldn't hesitate to use it on the roadie either. The newish Rogue is a nice replacement for the rocket.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogus
    I had heard that Camelbak was coming out with a new style of hydration pack that sits on the lower back taking the weight off the arms and placing it above the seat. If I was replacing mine, I'd wait until those were out before I made a decision.
    something like this?

    http://www.runningwarehouse.com/descpage-CBFF11.html

  6. #31
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    I also use the Rogue filled with clear water. I carry tubes, C02, multi tool, patch kit,cell phone, and a $20 bill. On long rides or hot days I will use the 2 frame mounted cages for electrolyte replacement. I use the jersey pockets for food. I like not having anything rattling around on my bike.

  7. #32
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    There are times it is just easier to carry a Camelback. Tour de Palm Springs is one of those rides that the starting temp is int he 40's and by id way it can in the 80's. Then when you finish it is back down to the 50's. The Camelback gives me a place other than my back pockets to store my windbreaker and knee warmers that I need to start the ride in as well as extra Hydration for that long stretch in to Indio before the next rest stop. I have no problem wearing a Camelback on my road bike if the situation is right for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Catzilla;
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  8. #33
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    Hi all,

    The thread is old, but I still want to add my 2 cents.

    I have 4 different hydration packs. The smallest one is 1.5-liter Camelbak HydroBak. I use it mostly for running.

    The biggest one is Camelbak Lobo which i use for long-hours hiking.

    I also have 2 more, but they are quite old and I probably will discard them soon.

    I am using hydration packs for nearly 10 years now. Before I was a fan of bottles. Of course, you did not have such a big choice of hydration packs back then. Now I would not trade my packs for bottles

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeY View Post
    Hi all,

    The thread is old, but I still want to add my 2 cents.

    I have 4 different hydration packs. The smallest one is 1.5-liter Camelbak HydroBak. I use it mostly for running.

    The biggest one is Camelbak Lobo which i use for long-hours hiking.

    I also have 2 more, but they are quite old and I probably will discard them soon.

    I am using hydration packs for nearly 10 years now. Before I was a fan of bottles. Of course, you did not have such a big choice of hydration packs back then. Now I would not trade my packs for bottles
    These are very popular here in Europe:
    Race EXP Air - Bikebackpack - Deuter

  10. #35
    Jno
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    I drink lots of water and ride where water's scarce so I use a seat post mounted bottle holder (2 cages). I got the idea from a triathlon friend. Works great

  11. #36
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    When the weather is hot, >95, and humid, I use a small Camelbak for road rides. I pack it with as much ice as possible and add a little cold water to it. It keeps my back cool and provides a good bit of water. I carry the usual two bottles in the cages as well.

    I understand that a Camelbak or similar device is a felony fashion faux pas on a road bike, but a couple of ambulance rides for dehydration/low blood pressure got my attention.

  12. #37
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    Holy Resurrection Batman, i think this is the longest one I've ever seen.

    Sent from my XT1049 using Tapatalk

  13. #38
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    And I'm going to add to this time capsule. I don't know what it is but I hate reaching for bottles on my bike, especially when exhaustion is sitting in. I also hate filling 4 different bottles when I could just fill one big pack. I road 30 miles this weekend in 90 plus and my 2 bottles were gone half way through in the middle of nowhere. People that say you can get water along the way have never ridden in Iowa before.

  14. #39
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    My daughter gave me a hydration pack, and I use it. I don't know why other roadies do not use one.
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe the biker View Post
    OP please refer to Rule #32. All of you offering assistance please refer to Rule #2.
    This.

    Can't imagine sprinting, hard cornering, or climbing out of the saddle with a water sack sloshing around on my back. Nevermind how sweaty my back would get.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  16. #41
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    Been thinking about carrying mine , ran out of water quick earlier this week. 102 outside and 48 ounces went quick, my camelback has 100 ounces in it.


    funny the second post in this thread is wrong and he was never called out. Camelback were designed for the Hooter then Hell 100 race in Texas, not for MTB riding.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdoug View Post
    And I'm going to add to this time capsule. I don't know what it is but I hate reaching for bottles on my bike, especially when exhaustion is sitting in. I also hate filling 4 different bottles when I could just fill one big pack. I road* 30 miles this weekend in 90 plus and my 2 bottles were gone half way through in the middle of nowhere. People that say you can get water along the way have never ridden in Iowa before.
    You're telling me you don't know which towns have a Casey's on your routes? Or which towns have a shiny new Casey's? Or one of the new Kum and Go's? You ride with your eyes closed or what?

    30 rode* miles in almost any heat is usually a two bottle ride for me. 30 gravel miles means I'll be happy to have a third bottle. I don't think about where the pit-stop Casey's is until the route is in the 50 mile range, and when I head out for one of those I just make sure I have $10 for the stop.
    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  18. #43
    JSR
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdoug View Post
    I don't know what it is but I hate reaching for bottles on my bike, especially when exhaustion is sitting in.
    I hear you. He's a real wheel sucker. He can't be trusted near your bottles.

  19. #44
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    If you are willing to go the hydration pack route I recommend Camelbak. I've had mine (a H.A.W.G model - intended for MTB and hiking) for 20+ years and it's still going strong.

    They have made some really great improvements over the years. The opening for the reservoir is much bigger now, (easier to clean), and the valve systems have improved.
    I've also gotten really good use from it on family trips, especially to Disney when its hot.

  20. #45
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    Camelback and Osprey are the primo hydropacks.

    But I have used the same MEC.ca pack for 20 years now. Exclusively for mtn biking. Fits the Platypus bladders. Trouble is .. I find it a pain keeping them clean and keeping the bite valve clean and out of my way. So for the last 3 years I just carry a roadie bottle - inside my little mtn bike pack.

    Now for road riding, I have never used a backpack/hydro pack. A bottle or two on the frame suffices, and can be refilled en route. Perhaps if I ever had to ride in the desert in heat I would consider a camelback. Two hour road ride here yesterday and I drank less than half a bottle.

    BTW I recently bought a very large full features hydration+backpack. Was $30cdn at Costco, under the Ironman brand. Kind of amazing value - I will use it for epic mtn bike rides where I need a lot of tools, water and maybe clothes. Similar size/features from Camelback will be $150, albeit the Camelback is better built than the Ironman one.

    20yr old one from MEC, still used every MTB ride. $30 Ironman hydropack on right I will use for occasional epic rides (eg in Moab). Both hold 2L stock, but the Ironman could easily carry a 2nd 2L bladder
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 06-12-2017 at 04:13 PM.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by B_arrington View Post
    If you are willing to go the hydration pack route I recommend Camelbak. I've had mine (a H.A.W.G model - intended for MTB and hiking) for 20+ years and it's still going strong.

    They have made some really great improvements over the years. The opening for the reservoir is much bigger now, (easier to clean), and the valve systems have improved.
    I've also gotten really good use from it on family trips, especially to Disney when its hot.
    Yupo.

    I dug my 12-15(?) year old Camelbak Rocket out of the closet for touring this summer for the first time in 10 years. Just needed a new reservoir bladder and tube/valve ($30 Prime on Amazon all totalled), and good as new.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  22. #47
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    I use a Camelbak as well; don't remember which model. I use it for road riding and I absolutely stay better hydrated vs. when I formerly used bottles. Also, it provides 100% sun block for at least a portion of my back which is good. I can understand people not wanting something on their back but for me the benefits outweigh the comfort factor.

  23. #48
    E_B
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    This is a perfect solution if you want to look like a total Fred, ignoring any history of elegance and beauty the sport of cycling has earned over the last century.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by E_B View Post
    This is a perfect solution if you want to look like a total Fred, ignoring any history of elegance and beauty the sport of cycling has earned over the last century.
    That's terrific.

    Anyway, I recommend the Camelbak Chase vest. It's particularly useful on gravel rides where taking your hands off the bar is tricky. When I need to carry more stuff (usually mountain biking), I have the Osprey Raptor 10. It's great.

  25. #50
    E_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
    That's terrific.

    It's particularly useful on gravel rides where taking your hands off the bar is tricky.
    For those that need two hands to drink?
    Early gravel road riders managed bidons and gravel, have we devolved to a new level of soft?

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