Good road cycling hydration pack?
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  1. #1
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    Good road cycling hydration pack?

    Im looking for a nice hydration pack like a camelbak. I want something that is small, but able to hold a spare tube/wallet and keys. I obviously need to carry a mini pump too. If it can fit in the pack that would be a plus.

    thanks, Kyle

  2. #2
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    You probably won't get much feedback here, Kyle, since few road cyclists use such packs. Most roadies find it easier to use bottles in cages on the frame, and prefer not to carry stuff on their backs. Camelbacks were really invented because aggressive mountain biking doesn't let you take a hand off the bar often. Not so on the road.

    If you have a local shop that carries a selection, check some out and see what works for you. You might get more advice on a MTB fourm. But maybe somebody will chime in here.

  3. #3
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    I think you answered your own question. Camelback's work great. I use one when I ride my MTB and I carry everything you listed and more in it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon351
    I think you answered your own question. Camelback's work great. I use one when I ride my MTB and I carry everything you listed and more in it.
    Yep,
    camelbak makes some small race type packs.

    A pack can be annoying though. I ride mtb a lot and still use bottles on the road. I even put a 3rd in my middle jersey pocket. That get's me 65 mi or so without needing to stop for water.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  5. #5
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    I'm with JCavilia, but since you asked, I'd recommend the Camelbak brand. Also, I'd recommend you get something a little bit larger than something that would be road specific, only because the pack will be more versatile for other activities from mountain biking to hiking, to doing the tourist thing at the local county fair.

    I have a Camelbak Blowfish and its got plenty of capacity, a variety of pockets, and a large reservoir.

    Cambria Bike Outfitters is currently having a sale: http://thurly.net/0d9d

  6. #6
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    I was thinking the vest type Pack Plus 2 bottles may let me go 100 miles
    Maybe half the distance in summer

  7. #7
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    Okay, Iíll bite. I live in the south east and itís more than just a little warm here in the summer. I fill 2 bottles with Gatorade and then fill my Deuter Hydro Lite 3 with ice water. I went with the Deuter pack because it elevates the pack off the center of your back so you can actually get some air flow on your back plus I think the bladder is better than Camelbackís. The bladder has a wide opening at the top which makes cleaning simple. As for the pack itself, you could toss a spare tube and a wallet in there but a pump may not fit if you completely fill the bladder.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorCyclist
    I was thinking the vest type Pack Plus 2 bottles may let me go 100 miles
    Maybe half the distance in summer
    Most riders don't try to carry all the water for a ride that long. Makes more sense to stop and re-fill along the way, rather than lug two or three pounds of water that you're not going to drink until three hours later. You'll generally want to stop once or twice (briefly) in a century anyway.

  9. #9
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    so if you carry mini pumps or a spare tube, where do you store them?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildkyle90
    so if you carry mini pumps or a spare tube, where do you store them?
    Mini pumps attach under a bottle cage; tubes and keys in a small bag under the saddle.

    Edit: Plus there's pockets on the back of most jerseys.
    Life is better in the big ring.

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  11. #11
    Good news everyone!
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    Jersey pockets usually, or use a saddle bag.

  12. #12
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    Road bike = no camel back

    2 bottles on bike, 1 in jersey (if you really need it). You are on roads...there are places to stop
    Well trained....well rested......pick one!

  13. #13
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    I like using a camelback even on the road bike. Rode mtb long before road and find the bag on the back more comfortable and fits my use and function better. My Camelbak (Rocket?) is several years old and still works xlnt for me. It is smaller and sleeker in design than most mtb bags. I have seen more brands and models that would work well on the road though. Due to wear, I am in the hunt for new one.

    Has enough room for 70oz of water, all my mechanical and personal "stuff" and extra room for extra gloves, light jacket or misc when needed. Personally, I have never liked bike bags, attaching pumps or stuffing my pockets. I like having the bike clean and unencumbered. Just a personal taste for road and mtb alike.

    When I leave for a ride I grab the bag for the bike I am using and everything I need is there. I ride mostly unsupported and solo, so I like to be self contained, whether it be water, food, or tools on my rides. Even when I do centuries, I tend to make minimal stops. On my normal rides stopping for a coffee break midway is never in my regular schedule, so refilling along the way does not fit for me.

    Give a bag a try, it may work for you too. Do not worry about being a slave to the fashion police- use what works and enjoy the ride.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FR hokeypokey

    Give a bag a try, it may work for you too. Do not worry about being a slave to the fashion police- use what works and enjoy the ride.

    I don't ride with bottles because of the fashion police. You would know that if you saw me on the road, LOL. I have a good hydro pack too. A Deuter Race Air which suspends the pack off your back. However, I find it just way cooler to ride with nothing on your back. The airflow keeps me cooler. I did do my first few 60+mi rides with my hydro pack, and love the bottles way better.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  15. #15
    I ride in circles..
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    I'm actually getting a small camelbak for longer rides.. I prefer just bottles but I sometimes don't want to stop. Easier to fill bottles with sports drink and camelbak with ice water. On that note.. I'm not about to carry 20lbs of stuff on my back either!
    ~ Long Live Long Rides~

  16. #16
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    Not arguing the no bag/cooler back principle. I am willing to sacrifice the sweaty back. The bag works for me because I am just more comfortable with the bag and gear compressed and neatly tucked on my back. I truly do not feel comfortable without the bag after all these years.

    I also am the geeky guy that carries too much stuff than I need- just in case. Beyond the usual "stuff" most people carry, I usually have a first aid kit, various tools for roadside repairs(I hate walking home or calling my wife), a couple of tubes and more food and clothes than normally needed. I have a "worst case" mentality with a little "be prepared" thrown in!

    Just for the record, I am not anti-bottle. I normally have water in the bag and a Cytomax mix in the bottle on the road or mtb.

  17. #17
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    Camelback XLP

    I have had several packs and have found I like this one the best for road rides. The flexible pouch is really handy for carry a mini pump, vest, and whatever else you can cram inside. The zippered pocket has room for keys and tools. This pack is also light and easily adjustable.

    http://www.camelbak.com/sports-recre.../2010-xlp.aspx

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia
    Most roadies... prefer not to carry stuff on their backs.
    It's a good thing that jerseys don't have pockets on the backside because nobody would ever use them.

    Dave

  19. #19
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    Rules

    OP please refer to Rule #32. All of you offering assistance please refer to Rule #2.

  20. #20
    prosciutto corsa
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    I'd recommend getting a Hydrapak bladder to supplement whatever pack you get.

    It's reversible so cleaning is a breeze. No tabs or special cleaners.
    Steel: it's what's for bikefast.

  21. #21
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    I had heard that Camelbak was coming out with a new style of hydration pack that sits on the lower back taking the weight off the arms and placing it above the seat. If I was replacing mine, I'd wait until those were out before I made a decision.

  22. #22
    I ride in circles..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe the biker
    OP please refer to Rule #32. All of you offering assistance please refer to Rule #2.

    Rules of the euro cyclist eh?

    haha
    ~ Long Live Long Rides~

  23. #23
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  24. #24
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    I also am a fan of the Camelbak for the mtb but bottles for the road. What works well for me is 2 bottle cages on the frame and a double bottle cage that mounts to the seat post and allows me to carry two more bottles behind the seat. I fill and freeze two bottles the night before and put them behind the seat. A small wedge under the seat holds a spare tube, patch kit, zip ties, etc. Small frame pump mounts under one of the frame-mounted bottle cages. A hanky, cell phone and snacks go in my jersey pockets. I've got plenty of cold drinks for a 4-hour ride and no annoying pack on my back.

  25. #25
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    I always ride with a hydration pack, mtn, road, even when racing cross. I have a camel back rogue for mtn/road, and a racebak for cross. When I get thirsty, I drink while I ride. For me, quickly grabbing the hose and getting it to my mouth is much faster...and safer than fumbling with a bottle from the bike or a jersey pocket. I will use both camelbak and bottles for extended rides.

    Bottle cages still on the bikes-for long rides/batteries for lights, etc-no additional crap/pumps/seat bags/etc attached to the bike. Everything goes in the camelbak-tube if applicable, tools, phone, keys, pump, C02 cart, etc.

    The only problem with the hydration pak's for the road-some jackets with sholder vents won't breath worth a damn, and the shoulder straps can put marks on the fancy jerseys.

    Go with the hydration pak, if that's how your most comfortable getting your water.

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