How to hide a mini pump. I'm soo smart - Page 4
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  1. #76
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    Yeah , good idea but not the first.

    I know people that will even tie a string around tools and such and drop them down in there , especially back in the days of lever actuated seat post clamps.

    Might have been said already but at one time I cut a water bottle in half and used to keep my tool kit in there. Sure it cost me a bottle spot but it sure looked a hell of alot better than hanging of the seat.

  2. #77
    MXL
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    Quote Originally Posted by buster71 View Post
    Am I the only one who was a little afraid of where this pump was going to disappear to, especially when pics were promised?
    Me too! I thought he was going to tell us that he found a tube of K-Y jelly and...
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  3. #78
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    99% Of the cars the drive by think you look like a complete tool. To accentuate this, we wear skin tight clothing, usually fruity colored, and shave our legs just to rub in how stupid we look...

    .. and we concern ourselves with how a frame pump might look?

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsleepingjon View Post
    FYI - make sure you buy bike specific CO2 cartridges. The ones for BB guns contain oil mixed in with the CO2 that lubricates the parts of the gun each time it fires. You probably don't want that in your inner tube.
    That isn't true. All that's in any CO2 cartridges is CO2. That's just an internet rumor and if you don't believe me, do a google search and see if you can find where oil is injected in the cartridge. You won't.

    CO2 cartridges can be found very cheap. But one word of caution - the threaded ones cost much more. Just make sure your inflator can take non-threaded or is strictly for non-threaded before buying a bunch of that type.

  5. #80
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    bump...I've found a better way to hide a pump

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by franklinb965 View Post
    bump...I've found a better way to hide a pump
    Point?

  7. #82
    Where's that GPS?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomH View Post
    99% Of the cars the drive by think you look like a complete tool. To accentuate this, we wear skin tight clothing, usually fruity colored, and shave our legs just to rub in how stupid we look...

    .. and we concern ourselves with how a frame pump might look?
    LOL - true that. I used to carry a mini-pump in my jersey pocket, but found I kept forgetting it at home- which was okay cause it really didn't work worth a damn anyway.

    So I got a new one (Topeak Micro Rocket CBT Bicycle Pump) that could attach to my bottle cage. Damn thing is in "carbon" so is really well camoflaged against my bike's carbon frame - if you didn't know to look for it, you probably wouldn't even notice it unless you looked closely. It's not an eye-sore and yet is easy to access when I need it. Works great as well!


    http://www.probikekit.com/us/tools-m...ycle-pump.html
    Last edited by LostViking; 02-21-2013 at 10:39 AM.
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  8. #83
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    In the bottle in the back cage I have:

    Spare tube
    Patches & glue
    Topeak Mini pump
    Multi tool
    Hand towel
    2x tyre lever

    Phone & energy bar(s) in jersey pocket.

    This is the cleanest & quickest to use setup I've found...

  9. #84
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    Great idea but it won't fit anymore on top of the shotgun shells I hide in my ST.
    Life is like a dogsled team. If you ain't the lead dog, the view never changes

  10. #85
    Where's that GPS?
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    Quote Originally Posted by f3rg View Post
    I don't know why people are being such dicks about it.
    Because many of us like to argue about things - the more inconsequential, the better!
    1980's - Centurion
    1990's - Peugeot
    2000's - Specialized
    2010's - Bianchi

    ''This story was so perfect for so long. It's this myth, this perfect story, and it wasn't true.'' - Lance Armstrong

    "Treks trying to look like Bianchis, that's sooooo cute!" Participant at a Century Ride

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigel91 View Post
    In the bottle in the back cage I have:

    Spare tube
    Patches & glue
    Topeak Mini pump
    Multi tool
    Hand towel
    2x tyre lever

    Phone & energy bar(s) in jersey pocket.

    This is the cleanest & quickest to use setup I've found...
    Sounds like a good set-up.

    Besides the pump on my bottle-cage, I usually stuff 3 levers/flat kit/multi-tool (car key) in pocket#1, spare tube in pocket#2 and my cellphone in pocket#3.
    Everything is in little zip-lock baggies to stay dry (protection from sweat and rain). Should I crash, not so much of a garden sale as everything is packaged. Also pre-packaged and easy to get in pockets when getting ready for a ride and out of pockets when needed - no fishing around for individual bits. Works for me.

    If the OP can make the mini-pump in the seat-tube idea work for him - well that's all good then, isn't it?
    Last edited by LostViking; 02-21-2013 at 10:46 AM.
    1980's - Centurion
    1990's - Peugeot
    2000's - Specialized
    2010's - Bianchi

    ''This story was so perfect for so long. It's this myth, this perfect story, and it wasn't true.'' - Lance Armstrong

    "Treks trying to look like Bianchis, that's sooooo cute!" Participant at a Century Ride

  12. #87
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    Hi - first post and apologies for resurrecting an old thread - I stumbled on this forum and thread after googling 'seatpost in seat tube'

    I am surprised at the level of negative comments to the OPs idea, but I guess that is forum life. I suspect Mr Starley's mates took the P all those years back when he turned up for a ride on a bike with two equal sized wheels and a chain drive

    I happen to believe this might be good idea if done right and this is why:

    I bought one of these pumps https://www.trivio.com/en_US/p/pump-...ressure/17487/ It cost me just 14 and is a quality item, just what you need and no more, well made, double the stroke of your average mini pump and light weight - 105g

    The only problem is its length, at 335mm, far to long to fit in a back pocket and also (in my opinion) to long to mount behind a bottle cage.

    So I decided to try putting it in the seat tube.

    It is long enough to rest on the bottle cage screw while still sticking out the top of the seat tube - so removing will never be a problem.
    A couple of o-rings and it doesn't rattle or touch the grease.
    A small square of tape to mark the seatpost position
    Suitable allen key packed with spare tubes

    I now have a completely hidden, good quality, long (ish) pump, accessible in seconds.

    150 strokes on this pump produces 85 psi in a 25mm tyre.
    My Specialized Carbon pump (which is a good mini pump) is 250mm long, weighs much the same and achieves just 45psi in 150 strokes!

    It takes a few seconds to remove the seat post but you get that back several times over by the time saved pumping!

    I am going to try this set up for a while and see how it works out on the road. I will report back if you are interested?

    My only fear is that my cycling mates take the P like you lot did to the OP. I like to think that they (and most of the human race) are a bit more enlightened than you lot, I guess they must be or we would all still be living in caves

  13. #88
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  14. #89
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by u r rrrs View Post
    Hi - first post and apologies for resurrecting an old thread - I stumbled on this forum and thread after googling 'seatpost in seat tube'

    I am surprised at the level of negative comments to the OPs idea, but I guess that is forum life. I suspect Mr Starley's mates took the P all those years back when he turned up for a ride on a bike with two equal sized wheels and a chain drive

    I happen to believe this might be good idea if done right and this is why:

    I bought one of these pumps https://www.trivio.com/en_US/p/pump-...ressure/17487/ It cost me just 14 and is a quality item, just what you need and no more, well made, double the stroke of your average mini pump and light weight - 105g

    The only problem is its length, at 335mm, far to long to fit in a back pocket and also (in my opinion) to long to mount behind a bottle cage.

    So I decided to try putting it in the seat tube.

    It is long enough to rest on the bottle cage screw while still sticking out the top of the seat tube - so removing will never be a problem.
    A couple of o-rings and it doesn't rattle or touch the grease.
    A small square of tape to mark the seatpost position
    Suitable allen key packed with spare tubes

    I now have a completely hidden, good quality, long (ish) pump, accessible in seconds.

    150 strokes on this pump produces 85 psi in a 25mm tyre.
    My Specialized Carbon pump (which is a good mini pump) is 250mm long, weighs much the same and achieves just 45psi in 150 strokes!

    It takes a few seconds to remove the seat post but you get that back several times over by the time saved pumping!

    I am going to try this set up for a while and see how it works out on the road. I will report back if you are interested?

    My only fear is that my cycling mates take the P like you lot did to the OP. I like to think that they (and most of the human race) are a bit more enlightened than you lot, I guess they must be or we would all still be living in caves
    All the haters moved over to Face Book years ago. There's only us nice guys left here these days.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    All the haters moved over to Face Book years ago. There's only us nice guys left here these days.
    That is excellent news

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