How many have to adjust derailleur after swapping wheels?
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  1. #1
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    How many have to adjust derailleur after swapping wheels?

    Im contemplating getting a second wheelset for my ride. *In doing some research, I was told that sometimes you have to "adjust your derailleur" after swapping wheels.*

    I assume this is because of the width tolerances of the hub can be different and therefore the cassette isn't in the same line? *

    Not being a mechanic, what exactly would I be adjusting then? *Wouldn't that mean I would have to "adjust" the limit screws every time? *And/Or something else? *

    Sounds like a major pain.*

    How common is this?
    Any experiences with this?

    Fwiw I currently have a bontrager wheelset and am contemplating various aero wheels, probably some Boyds. *

    Thanks.*

  2. #2
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    I have too many wheelsets. An OEM Campy pair that's my main pair, a Zipp 404 pair with Shimano splines and aconversion cassette, a couple of Neuvations, one with Campy splines, one with Shimano + conversion cassette.

    There are definite tolerance differences between all of them.

    I set up my shifting to work on the primary pair. I can swap to any of the others and at worst I'll have a bit of noise in one or two cogs, with the occasional need to undershift / overshift to hit the right cog.

    I'm not very picky about having a perfectly tuned set of shifters, so it doesn't bother me. But if you're the type that imperfect shifting will drive you crazy, yeah it could be annoying.

    Also, I'm using Campy levers so there's a bit of built-in trimming ability, not sure how Shimano or SRAM would react.
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  3. #3
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    I tell ya the really annoying thing is not the shifting, it's that no two of the wheels are dished the same. I have to carry brake wrenches around in my wheel bag to center the calipers every time the wheels change... guess I could just throw the wheels on the truing stand...
    * not actually a Rock Star

  4. #4
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    Unfortunately it happens, it could be a minor adjustment of the limits screws, or a turn +/- of the barrel adjustment. Or it could be combination of everything, including pad and caliper adjustment.
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  5. #5
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    Unless both rear wheels have the exact same hub/cassette body, it's quite a possibility.

    To alleviate any potential headaches, I always rode identical hubs. It's worth the peace of mind.

  6. #6
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    I have 4 rear wheels and interchange them freely between 2 bikes. I have the limit screws set up very slightly on the relaxed side to accommodate minor variation, and at most I need a 1/4 or 1/2 turn of cable tension adjustment to get perfect shifting. I have used additional 1mm spacers between the hub and the largest cog on the cassette to bring a wheel back to a more compatible chain-line (still ensuring that I can still get the smallest cog and lock-ring on securely). I did have one wheel that had very bad dish and chain-line. However, it broke when a spoke pulled through the rim (probably because it was a bad build) and the replacement warranty wheel had none of these problems. So with some care one can address this to make wheel swapping easier.

    But note that if you have both carbon and Al rims, you're going to have to swap brake pads too ...
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  7. #7
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    for the most part they will be fairly close. I've never had to adjust limit screws after initially testing out both wheels, just set them to where both work and your fine. Cable tension can change, just turn the barrel adjuster a bit and you should be able to get it working. As for brakes, i have mine mounted on loose enough to where i can just rotate them by hand. aluminum and carbon rims should have different brake pads, i usually just used the carbon pads on aluminum rims and made sure to check/clean them every few weeks.

  8. #8
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    I've had good success using very thin spacers (Wheel Mft. makes them) between the cassette and hub body to slightly adjust any interfaces that aren't close enough. They make them in 1 and 1.5 mm thicknesses.

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