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  1. #1
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    How many miles are you getting out of DA chains?

    My chainrings have 6,585 miles on them, my cassette has 1,135 miles on it, and my last chain only lasted 1,135 miles until .5 worn. The chain before that lasted 2,070 miles and the chain before that lasted 3,607 miles. As I type this, I guess it's possible my chainrings are worn but that seems low mileage to wear out for a fair weather only bike (I don't even ride on wet pavement much less rain) with religious maintenance.

  2. #2
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    11-speed?

  3. #3
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    Who buys dura ace chains?

    Well I have but only when the price was right.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  4. #4
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    I usually change mine out after 6 months which equates to 2500 - 3000 miles. I recently changed out a front DA 38t chainring after 12000 miles or so. It didn't look worn but the drive train quieted down significantly afterwards. I change cassettes after 3 chains and they are starting to show wear. I lube every 200 miles or every rain ride whichever comes first with Rock n' Roll gold.

  5. #5
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    My 7800 chainrings have 55,290 miles in them. (they are still fine), and my current 7800 chain has 15,500 miles on it (still within .5% =1/16"). Time for a replacement, next year)……...11 speed chains won't last quite as long.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    My 7800 chainrings have 55,290 miles in them. (they are still fine), and my current 7800 chain has 15,500 miles on it (still within .5% =1/16"). Time for a replacement, next year)……...11 speed chains won't last quite as long.
    similar to my mileages...

    7800 DA rings have 58K miles, DA cassette has ~30K, KMC chain has 10.8K.

    will probably do a big overhaul on New Year's Day...going to install new big ring, chain, pedals, saddle, bar tape. everything will be all fresh and pretty...
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  7. #7
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    11 speed Dura Ace

    I usually get 2-2.5k miles per chain so I got a little spooked ruining one at 1k miles

    I lube/wipe down (Rock n roll gold) every 80-100 miles. I’m a strong rider but I’m religious with maintenance.
    Last edited by thisisthebeave; 10-13-2018 at 07:20 PM.

  8. #8
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    When checking chain wear do you take one sample reading or multiple readings? Sometimes I find some variations in readings so I take several to get a feel of the true wear.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Who buys dura ace chains?

    Well I have but only when the price was right.
    Whenever they're on sale I buy several. The difference between Ultegra and DA chains is maybe $3-5/ea.

  10. #10
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    The Dura Ace chain now comes with one quick link. I’m not sure if Ultegra does or not. Dura Ace is also lighter in weight.


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  11. #11
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    About 5000 miles before I change it - I could go longer based on pin to pin measurement but they start to make a bit more noise than I like around then. I get them when they are discounted heavily.
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  12. #12
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    Anywhere between 1 and 3 thousand depending on rain and how much gravel riding I do.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdlpsher View Post
    When checking chain wear do you take one sample reading or multiple readings? Sometimes I find some variations in readings so I take several to get a feel of the true wear.


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    Yes, I take 2-3 readings. I use the Park tool that drops in if the chain is .5 worn. I had to push a little bit to get it to go in but that just means I'm a couple hundred miles away from it falling in with no pressure.

  14. #14
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    I wonder if there’s a quality issue with the chain you got. Meaning they are slightly longer than the spec. when new. I also use DA chains and get at least 2,500 miles before 0.5% with a Park tool. Next time before you install a new chain, measure the wear. I see 0.25% on a new DA chain. A new KMC chain shows slightly less than 0.25%.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisisthebeave View Post
    Yes, I take 2-3 readings. I use the Park tool that drops in if the chain is .5 worn. I had to push a little bit to get it to go in but that just means I'm a couple hundred miles away from it falling in with no pressure.
    Go back and check how much the chain actually elongated. Use a ruler and measure at least 12" (worn out = 1/16" elongation over 12 " = 0.5%). I'm wondering if your chain checker is giving you bad results. They are notoriously innacurate.

  16. #16
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    It sounds like you are replacing your chains earlier than you need to. What are you using to measure? That Park Tool chain wear meter can give multiple erroneous readings. New chains often read 0.5 right out of the box!

    Use a ruler. They don't lie.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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