Humbled!

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  • 03-15-2019
    Oracle7775
    Humbled!
    People are always impressed when I tell them I build my own bikes--even other cyclists. It is a point of pride for me and I guess I got a little cocky...

    This month I got a new aero frame, and I was excited to build it up from scratch. My Ultegra 6700 groupset has served me well for about 7 years now, but I felt like it was time to move up to 11-speed and Di2. So, when all parts were assembled, I was excited to put it all together.

    Took it for its first ride yesterday and it was awesome... at least for the first 15 miles or so. Then I started hearing some weird noises from the rear derailleur when using larger sprockets, and then a disturbing, regular "clacking" coming from the drivetrain. First thought was that my new frame was cracking, and I was still 6 miles from anywhere. Then SNAP, the brand new chain broke! I had my phone on me, but I just couldn't face up to the embarrassment of calling my wife (at work, no less). I managed to jimmy the chain back together and limped slowly back to safety.

    So, despite my supposed wrenching prowess, I failed to properly put together the friggin' chain. Ugh. Also, it turns out that the Di2 derailleur hangs a bit differently than my old 6700 did! I promise, the next time I get new bike parts, that I will make sure to read the instructions.

    Lessons learned!
  • 03-15-2019
    Akirasho
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Oracle7775 View Post
    People are always impressed when I tell them I build my own bikes--even other cyclists. It is a point of pride for me and I guess I got a little cocky...

    This month I got a new aero frame, and I was excited to build it up from scratch. My Ultegra 6700 groupset has served me well for about 7 years now, but I felt like it was time to move up to 11-speed and Di2. So, when all parts were assembled, I was excited to put it all together.

    Took it for its first ride yesterday and it was awesome... at least for the first 15 miles or so. Then I started hearing some weird noises from the rear derailleur when using larger sprockets, and then a disturbing, regular "clacking" coming from the drivetrain. First thought was that my new frame was cracking, and I was still 6 miles from anywhere. Then SNAP, the brand new chain broke! I had my phone on me, but I just couldn't face up to the embarrassment of calling my wife (at work, no less). I managed to jimmy the chain back together and limped slowly back to safety.

    So, despite my supposed wrenching prowess, I failed to properly put together the friggin' chain. Ugh. Also, it turns out that the Di2 derailleur hangs a bit differently than my old 6700 did! I promise, the next time I get new bike parts, that I will make sure to read the instructions.

    Lessons learned!

    Kudos for doing your own builds!

    I started assembling components into a viable rig back in the early nineties. One factor that made it easier was the relative standardization of parts/frames. Then, I started "tinkering" with the "new" 9 speed gruppos from Shimano in the late nineties.

    We began to see threadless headset along with splined (Octalink) BB/crank interfaces and other "upgrades". Back then we began to see decent and accurate info on the newfangled world wide web. You could legally and freely download Barnett's manuals back then along with Sheldon Brown's site, Park tools and a few others which kept you current.

    Then, things started to change again... from 1" threadless to 1 1/8" threadless and beyond. From 9 speed chains with special pins to 11. From threaded BB to external press fit bearings... GEESH!!!

    But this is what happens to old farts... dusted, er, humbled. But we keep trying as the world seems determined to BURY US!

    Even today, I keep 9 speed Shimano chain pins in my onboard tool kit.
  • 03-15-2019
    tlg
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Oracle7775 View Post
    Then SNAP, the brand new chain broke!

    Broke? Or the pin separated? My guess is you used the shimano pin and not a quick link?
  • 03-15-2019
    AlanE
    I'm interested in finding out how you "jimmy'd" the chain back together. Sounds like a McGuyver-worthy hack.
  • 03-15-2019
    Akirasho
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    I'm interested in finding out how you "jimmy'd" the chain back together. Sounds like a McGuyver-worthy hack.

    OP either used their mind to hold links together or twisted a couple pubes together to form a new "pin". No McG needed.
  • 03-18-2019
    Oracle7775
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Broke? Or the pin separated? My guess is you used the shimano pin and not a quick link?

    Right, the pin separated. That's how I was able to McGyver it back together to get home.

    Exactly. All I had lying around were 10 speed quick links, so I tried to set the shimano pin the old fashioned way. I guess I didn't push it through far enough and it eventually slipped out under load. The chain was f-ed, so I picked up an 11-speed KMC chain and quick link. Not only did I install it properly, but the KMC is so much quieter and smoother than the Ultegra chain.
  • 03-18-2019
    Oracle7775
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    I'm interested in finding out how you "jimmy'd" the chain back together. Sounds like a McGuyver-worthy hack.

    Luckily the pin was still there, so I was able to connect the links, then I used my multi-tool to bend the outside of the link so that it kinda-snapped onto the other side of the pin and held there. I couldn't put much load on it and topped out at about 12 mph the ride home, but it was faster than walking!
  • 03-18-2019
    Oracle7775
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Akirasho View Post
    OP either used their mind to hold links together or twisted a couple pubes together to form a new "pin". No McG needed.

    It was cold and windy, so I had a generous amount of snot to work with...