I got a FREE Titanium "barn find". Any info on manufacturer?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 63
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    51

    I got a FREE Titanium "barn find". Any info on manufacturer?

    Long story on this forgotten specimen but the other day, this "barn find" was given to me by a buddy after it was given to him weeks earlier.

    I turned him down on the offer despite his insistence (I have enough bikes and I don't want to take advantage - especially after he saw my absolute excitement at the site of it (I'm an absolute bike nerd) but we both at least agreed it needed a full restoration and a return to a period correct saddle and stem.

    It still has its full Dura Ace groupset but is in need of a full teardown and refurbishing. Overall it's in pretty good condition. There is some oxidation happening on some of the components but everything should clean up well enough. In the end, it will end up on the wall of his shop as a wall piece at the very least (ridden occasionally) as opposed to a forgotten bike buried in the back of an old friend's brother's workshop (we knew the original owner) who had all but forgotten about it.

    Crazy how this bike ended up in such a state. Our buddy had moved away taking 4 of his bikes and leaving 2 or 3 behind for his brother: this being one of them. The bike ended up buried under a pile of junk and debris in the back of his work shop and left for years. He showed up at my friend's bike shop to use as payment for a bike repair on the other he'd left. My shop owner buddy told him he couldn't keep it as the repair was only like $40. He insisted though and said if he didn't take it he likely toss it!! Absolutely insane! Of course he couldn't let that happen so the bike ended up in the back of the bike shop and left again.

    After we had talked about the crazy situation during a ride, my buddy then offered it up for me to have for free. I can't do it either. I don't want to take advantage but I agreed to tinker with the project.

    Here are a few pics of the free titanium barn find bike BEFORE resto (looks WAY worse in person - and yes, that's two flat tires).

    Anyone know ANYTHING about Pegasus titanium bikes? I can find nothing about the company whatsoever.

    Once complete, I'll post so after shots if anyone is interested. Poor thing.


    IMG_6160.jpgIMG_6161.jpgIMG_6162.jpgIMG_6164.jpgIMG_6166.jpgIMG_6167.JPGship-2.jpgside.jpg

    Teardown and wine off has begun. It'll be good I think.
    reflection.jpgIMG_6283.JPGIMG_6284.JPGreflection-2.jpgreflection-3.jpg

  2. #2
    What the what???
    Reputation: Opus51569's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12,425
    I won’t presume to speak for anyone else, but for me I’m seething with too much envy and jealousy to respond to this thread.

    No one I know gives away titanium bikes, and no one I know would refuse one if it was offered...


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Given his penchant for nicknames, and his aversion to reading, I've decided to shorten Donald J. Trump to it's essence: Dump*

    I was "social distancing" before it was cool.

  3. #3
    gazing from the shadows
    Reputation: QuiQuaeQuod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    27,096
    Quote Originally Posted by Ska! View Post
    Anyone know ANYTHING about Pegasus titanium bikes? I can find nothing about the company whatsoever.
    Might be this company: https://www.pegasus-bikes.com/

    They say they have been making bikes for over 30 years, so this would be my guess.

    I would also guess the frame is a standard Chinese Ti from from when Ti was the big thing. Lots of brands sold those under their label. And given Pegasus's current lineup, I would guess they follow trends and get what they sell from China.

    Yep, guessing. Never heard of it before.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  4. #4
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    What's the web address on the chainstay?

    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    7,055
    Wow, that's awesome! Brand really doesn't matter with a frame like that in my opinion. Build it up and ride the snot out of it I say. Post some pics once you get it set up the way you want. Congrats!
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: redcon1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    What's the web address on the chainstay?
    The full frame view shows it to be www.pegasusbicycles.com - No longer an active domain.

  7. #7
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by redcon1 View Post
    The full frame view shows it to be www.pegasusbicycles.com - No longer an active domain.
    Thanks.

    With the website, you can search the internet archive. The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the World Wide Web. It allows the user to go “back in time” and see what websites looked like in the past.


    https://web.archive.org/web/2018*/ht...sbicycles.com/
    There are 91snapshots between February 1, 2001 and August 8, 2018

    Searching the archive is slow and incomplete. Pictures/photos and links are often missing. But you can often find lots of useful info.


    Pegasus - About Us
    Pegasus Bicycles is a small Canadian company that is passionate about cycling. The values of a small firm like us are to offer a truly unique customer focused approach in building a bicycle so that there will be many years of enjoyment in riding. The partners that Pegasus works with are also passionate about cycling and leaders in each product area - Shimano, Kish Custom Fabrication and Dedacciai. We look forward to working with you and to begin your journey please send an email or give us a call.

    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Thanks.

    With the website, you can search the internet archive. The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the World Wide Web. It allows the user to go “back in time” and see what websites looked like in the past.


    https://web.archive.org/web/2018*/ht...sbicycles.com/
    There are 91snapshots between February 1, 2001 and August 8, 2018

    Searching the archive is slow and incomplete. Pictures/photos and links are often missing. But you can often find lots of useful info.


    Pegasus - About Us
    Pegasus Bicycles is a small Canadian company that is passionate about cycling. The values of a small firm like us are to offer a truly unique customer focused approach in building a bicycle so that there will be many years of enjoyment in riding. The partners that Pegasus works with are also passionate about cycling and leaders in each product area - Shimano, Kish Custom Fabrication and Dedacciai. We look forward to working with you and to begin your journey please send an email or give us a call.

    That's fantastic! Thanks for that information! Cheers!

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    Might be this company: https://www.pegasus-bikes.com/

    They say they have been making bikes for over 30 years, so this would be my guess.

    I would also guess the frame is a standard Chinese Ti from from when Ti was the big thing. Lots of brands sold those under their label. And given Pegasus's current lineup, I would guess they follow trends and get what they sell from China.

    Yep, guessing. Never heard of it before.
    I had spotted that manufacturer and had already eliminated them as being those who built the frame I'm researching.

    Looks like tig worked some magic and found the old site. Canadian custom bike company. Makes sense. The original owner was into boutique stuff and liked to buy Canadian so......

    Thanks for the help guys!

    Work is ongoing but the bike is cleaning up nicely!

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,600

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by Ska! View Post
    Long story on this forgotten specimen but the other day, this "barn find" was given to me by a buddy after it was given to him weeks earlier.

    I turned him down on the offer despite his insistence (I have enough bikes and I don't want to take advantage - especially after he saw my absolute excitement at the site of it (I'm an absolute bike nerd) but we both at least agreed it needed a full restoration and a return to a period correct saddle and stem.

    It still has its full Dura Ace groupset but is in need of a full teardown and refurbishing. Overall it's in pretty good condition. There is some oxidation happening on some of the components but everything should clean up well enough. In the end, it will end up on the wall of his shop as a wall piece at the very least (ridden occasionally) as opposed to a forgotten bike buried in the back of an old friend's brother's workshop (we knew the original owner) who had all but forgotten about it.

    Crazy how this bike ended up in such a state. Our buddy had moved away taking 4 of his bikes and leaving 2 or 3 behind for his brother: this being one of them. The bike ended up buried under a pile of junk and debris in the back of his work shop and left for years. He showed up at my friend's bike shop to use as payment for a bike repair on the other he'd left. My shop owner buddy told him he couldn't keep it as the repair was only like $40. He insisted though and said if he didn't take it he likely toss it!! Absolutely insane! Of course he couldn't let that happen so the bike ended up in the back of the bike shop and left again.

    After we had talked about the crazy situation during a ride, my buddy then offered it up for me to have for free. I can't do it either. I don't want to take advantage but I agreed to tinker with the project.

    Here are a few pics of the free titanium barn find bike BEFORE resto (looks WAY worse in person - and yes, that's two flat tires).

    Anyone know ANYTHING about Pegasus titanium bikes? I can find nothing about the company whatsoever.

    Once complete, I'll post so after shots if anyone is interested. Poor thing.


    IMG_6160.jpgIMG_6161.jpgIMG_6162.jpgIMG_6164.jpgIMG_6166.jpgIMG_6167.JPGship-2.jpgside.jpg

    Teardown and wine off has begun. It'll be good I think.
    reflection.jpgIMG_6283.JPGIMG_6284.JPGreflection-2.jpgreflection-3.jpg
    The Early titanium bikes were prone to cracking so maintain a watch on it around the head tube and bottom bracket and rear drop-outs. Anywhere where aluminum touches the titanium, it could corrode so be a bit careful. Otherwise titanium was a very good material if a bit flexy. But at I'm 6'4" and at that time weighed 210 lbs so I'm probably biased. I simply could not ride my Colnago titanium bikes.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    The Early titanium bikes were prone to cracking so maintain a watch on it around the head tube and bottom bracket and rear drop-outs. Anywhere where aluminum touches the titanium, it could corrode so be a bit careful. Otherwise titanium was a very good material if a bit flexy. But at I'm 6'4" and at that time weighed 210 lbs so I'm probably biased. I simply could not ride my Colnago titanium bikes.
    Cheers man. Thanks for the heads up. I think I'll be OK though. Looked the frame over inside (borescope) and out while cleaning it up and refinishing the brush and there are no issues. Also, seeing as it is built up with a full Dura Ace 7700 groupo (7700 issued in 2001-2002) that isn't all that old for titanium. With all the research I've done, It's looking like it was built and purchased late 2001.

  13. #13
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,563
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    The Early titanium bikes were prone to cracking so maintain a watch on it around the head tube and bottom bracket and rear drop-outs. Anywhere where aluminum touches the titanium, it could corrode so be a bit careful. Otherwise titanium was a very good material if a bit flexy. But at I'm 6'4" and at that time weighed 210 lbs so I'm probably biased. I simply could not ride my Colnago titanium bikes.
    Given that its got a DA 7700 group on it, it's not completely ancient like that ti Colnago you refer to. Did you have a Bititan? Colnago's titanium bikes were notoriously bad. They were made in Russia, covered in gloppy clearcoat and complete noodles. A dual down tube? Who thinks of [email protected] like that? I've got a Litespeed Ultimate from that era and its not a bit flexy and I weigh what you do. Its on a second set of components and I still ride it quite a bit. Titanium frames can be as flexy or rigid as frames made from anything else.

    As far as the garage treasure goes, an old steel Eddy Merckx, Colnago or Pinarello would be a lot more exciting restoration IMO. But it was clearly a high end bike in its day and will still have some life left in it. Hope you get it back on the road.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Given that its got a DA 7700 group on it, it's not completely ancient like that ti Colnago you refer to. Did you have a Bititan? Colnago's titanium bikes were notoriously bad. They were made in Russia, covered in gloppy clearcoat and complete noodles. A dual down tube? Who thinks of [email protected] like that? I've got a Litespeed Ultimate from that era and its not a bit flexy and I weigh what you do. Its on a second set of components and I still ride it quite a bit. Titanium frames can be as flexy or rigid as frames made from anything else.

    As far as the garage treasure goes, an old steel Eddy Merckx, Colnago or Pinarello would be a lot more exciting restoration IMO. But it was clearly a high end bike in its day and will still have some life left in it. Hope you get it back on the road.
    I had both the Bititan and the large tube ti Colnago. While tall I have relatively short legs at 34". Colnago normally has a long top tube but for some reason I can't recall I got rid of it rather rapidly so there definitely was a problem with it. Today I have a garage full of bikes but prefer a Hong Kong constructed Colnago CLX3.0 and a Look 585. To tell you the truth the 9 speed 7700 is a better group than my Campy Record 10 speed, but the Colnago's Di2 shifts better than anything though I sort of cringe at having a bike you have to plug in.

    Moreover, all these extra speeds do for Joe Average Rider is spend all his time shifting to get in one of the 6 gears that he actually uses.

  15. #15
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,563
    I rode bikes with the 7700 group for a decade. It was as good looking as it was good functioning. I never had to tinker with it. Its odd how Shimano and Campy went from 10 to 11 to 12 speeds in that same time span. I was frankly happy with 9 speeds. And how did we ever muscle through with 53x39 chain rings and a 12x23 cassette. Remember when 12x27 was huge?

    And the mid line refresh. My wife has bikes with Dura Ace 9000 and 9100. The 9000 is better. I've replaced two 9100 rear derailers under warranty on her bike. My bike with Chorus version 1 shifts better than the bikes with version 2.

    I would like to get electronic shifting (I don't think I'd go Italian on that).

  16. #16
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    And how did we ever muscle through with 53x39 chain rings and a 12x23 cassette.
    I, and many, wouldn't.

    There's no way my knees would tolerate climbing the hills I enjoy in a 39/23. I'd be relegated to riding boring flat roads, which there aren't many around here.

    Progress is good.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  17. #17
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    the Colnago's Di2 shifts better than anything though I sort of cringe at having a bike you have to plug in.
    There is no such thing as 'Colnago's Di2'
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  18. #18
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,563
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    There is no such thing as 'Colnago's Di2'
    I think he meant Campy electronic -- I'm not sure what their name is for it, but it exists.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I, and many, wouldn't.

    There's no way my knees would tolerate climbing the hills I enjoy in a 39/23. I'd be relegated to riding boring flat roads, which there aren't many around here.

    Progress is good.
    Actually it is pretty easy - you just back off. Here I am 76 years old and I did a hard climb of 5 miles up to 1000 ft (that had some downhills in it so that the total climb is 1,400 feet) with grades of 12% in a 39-25 on a heavy Italian Steel Bike (Pinarello) and while I was happy to reach the top, my legs and knees were fine. The young guys that had shot by me on carbon frames the way up were leaning over the railing on top and puking and I didn't even have to stop and rode right by. One of them ran over and jumped on his bike in an attempt to catch me but downhill with some scary turns and hitting 45-50 mph made sure that he never got close. But I do prefer my compact with a 28.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    There is no such thing as 'Colnago's Di2'
    The Colnago is a CLX 3.0 and it has Di2 on it. Is that clearer for you? Or perhaps you think that there's no such thing as Di2?

  21. #21
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Actually it is pretty easy - you just back off. Here I am 76 years old and I did a hard climb of 5 miles up to 1000 ft (that had some downhills in it so that the total climb is 1,400 feet) with grades of 12% in a 39-25 on a heavy Italian Steel Bike (Pinarello) and while I was happy to reach the top, my legs and knees were fine.
    You and I ain't riding the same kind of hills.

    1,400ft over 5mi isn't steep. That's an average of <4%.
    I'm talking about hills over 12%. 15-20%+


    I really don't care about 'your' knees. I know my knees hurt when I have push through hard climbs.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  22. #22
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    The Colnago is a CLX 3.0 and it has Di2 on it. Is that clearer for you? Or perhaps you think that there's no such thing as Di2?
    Sorry, I misread and thought you meant Campy Di2. Which of course would be silly.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    You and I ain't riding the same kind of hills.

    1,400ft over 5mi isn't steep. That's an average of <4%.
    I'm talking about hills over 12%. 15-20%+


    I really don't care about 'your' knees. I know my knees hurt when I have push through hard climbs.
    Pardon me but are you some kind of nut? L'Alpe D'Huez is considered one of the hardest climbs in the world at 8 miles and an average grade of 8% and a max grade of 13%. Since I have done that sort of thing several times a week why don't you tell me that I don't know what I'm doing? 20%? Have you ever even done a grade of 20% for more than a couple of feet?

  24. #24
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Pardon me but are you some kind of nut? L'Alpe D'Huez is considered one of the hardest climbs in the world at 8 miles and an average grade of 8% and a max grade of 13%. Since I have done that sort of thing several times a week why don't you tell me that I don't know what I'm doing?
    I never said you don't know what you're doing. I really don't care what you're doing.

    What I said was you and I ain't riding the same kind of hills.

    20%? Have you ever even done a grade of 20% for more than a couple of feet?
    Yes.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    329
    I commonly do a 16% quarter mile climb and I have done a quarter mile 23% climb and I don't believe you if you are talking about straining your knees with a 39/25.

    That 23% I did with a Cat 1 racer and he could barely make it to the top. On the local Grizzly Peak Century they have a 1 mile 16% grade that many people have to walk up. And these are riders that commonly do every century in the state. In San Francisco the 18% and steeper climbs have steps on the sidewalks.

    I don't know how you are measuring grades, but it is plainly not very accurate. I am a climber and actually do these sorts of climbs. In the local 26 mile 1800 ft climb most of it is flat as well. But pretending that "average climb" has anything to do with climbing is pretty silly. When pros are doing 100 miles and then climbing a 10% climb and the entire peleton falls off from 5 leaders, don't tell me about average
    grade.

    \\https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...RST&ajaxhist=0

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pinarello Barn Find - Need Help
    By mbernard71 in forum Retro-Classic
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 08-01-2011, 07:44 AM
  2. Barn Find: Schwinn Super Sport
    By rmp in forum Retro-Classic
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-02-2010, 02:25 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.