The Importance of Facing
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  1. #1
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    The Importance of Facing


  2. #2
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    What is the rate of bicycle frame / parts damage or premature wear due to not having the high-precision mounting face?

  3. #3
    MDM
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    I've got mixed feelings about the need to do this. I hesitate to cut on/remove material from a frame unnecessarily, I don't have these expensive tools, and wonder why the frame manufacturer doesn't do all of this.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDM View Post
    I've got mixed feelings about the need to do this. I hesitate to cut on/remove material from a frame unnecessarily, I don't have these expensive tools, and wonder why the frame manufacturer doesn't do all of this.
    This has been an issue for decades, though it is much less of a problem than it used to be. Decades ago the tolerances on BBs were not that tight for many brands and so bearing, axle, and cup wear were pretty much accepted. Poor BB facing contributed to the problem. Over time, things have gotten much better but that doesn't mean that some brands and perhaps just the odd frame that slips past the quality checks don't show up as issues. With the possible exception of my first "good" bike I bought in 1969, I've never had a frame that needed facing. They came properly done from the builder. But these were all high-end bikes or custom built frames. I've heard many stories over the years of poorly faced BBs, including several reports on this forum.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    This has been an issue for decades, though it is much less of a problem than it used to be. Decades ago the tolerances on BBs were not that tight for many brands and so bearing, axle, and cup wear were pretty much accepted. Poor BB facing contributed to the problem. Over time, things have gotten much better but that doesn't mean that some brands and perhaps just the odd frame that slips past the quality checks don't show up as issues. With the possible exception of my first "good" bike I bought in 1969, I've never had a frame that needed facing. They came properly done from the builder. But these were all high-end bikes or custom built frames. I've heard many stories over the years of poorly faced BBs, including several reports on this forum.
    I don't think that facing is much of an issue with cartridge bottom brackets. My last quality frame was bought about 19 years ago. Columbus SLX tubing. I fear that I will have a problem if I ever want to remove the bottom bracket. Years ago I tried to remove the bottom bracket because I mistakingly thought it was defective. There was play in it. I could not unscrew it all the way. I just tightened it up, and have not had an issue since. I am tempted to buy a threading and a facing tool, but I cannot justify the cost for a one time use.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDM View Post
    I've got mixed feelings about the need to do this. I hesitate to cut on/remove material from a frame unnecessarily, I don't have these expensive tools, and wonder why the frame manufacturer doesn't do all of this.
    With mass production probably because time=money. Independent builders most likely do it as a matter of course.
    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    I don't think that facing is much of an issue with cartridge bottom brackets.
    If the BB faces are not parallel to each other, then that applies a torque on the system, whether it be a cartridge or not. There are many different types of BB systems now and none of them work "better" when the BB shell faces are not square.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    If the BB faces are not parallel to each other, then that applies a torque on the system, whether it be a cartridge or not. There are many different types of BB systems now and none of them work "better" when the BB shell faces are not square.
    A Phil Wood square taper BB probably doesn't care, one way or the other.

    https://phil-wood-co.myshopify.com/c...ottom-brackets
    Too old to ride plastic

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