LBS problem

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  • 08-09-2007
    TheRam
    LBS problem
    Hi everyone,
    I just bought an 07 Specialized Tarmac Expert today, it will be here mid-next week. My problem is that I bought it in California and I'm having it shipped to Champaign, IL where I go to school. Before everyone questions why I didn't buy the bike there, it's because there is no Specialized dealer within an hours' drive of the place. Giant, Cannondale and trek are represented in the LBS, but not Spec. The nearest place that's an hour away had very high prices, were out of the bike, and didn't have a good service plan, even if I wanted to drive that far. So, given that I didn't purchase the bike from the LBS, how friendly are bike shops to non-buyers? What is the average tuning price and how often do you think I should take the bike in, assuming an average of 100 miles ridden per week.

    Thanks!
  • 08-09-2007
    buck-50
    Any bike shop that gives you hassles because you didn't buy your bike at their shop is not a bike shop you should be giving any money to. You owe them no explanations as to why you didn't buy one of their bikes- they are a service provider- their job is to make your bike better.
  • 08-09-2007
    canthidefromme
    Well you go to school, just say you bought it at home. It isn't unreasonable to expect that people going to college (I assume) bought their bike at home.
  • 08-09-2007
    firstrax
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheRam
    Hi everyone,
    I just bought an 07 Specialized Tarmac Expert today, it will be here mid-next week. My problem is that I bought it in California and I'm having it shipped to Champaign, IL where I go to school. Before everyone questions why I didn't buy the bike there, it's because there is no Specialized dealer within an hours' drive of the place. Giant, Cannondale and trek are represented in the LBS, but not Spec. The nearest place that's an hour away had very high prices, were out of the bike, and didn't have a good service plan, even if I wanted to drive that far. So, given that I didn't purchase the bike from the LBS, how friendly are bike shops to non-buyers? What is the average tuning price and how often do you think I should take the bike in, assuming an average of 100 miles ridden per week.

    Thanks!

    Buy some tools, learn how to wrench you bike.
  • 08-09-2007
    ritjobbie
    I have never had a problem bringing a bike I bought elsewhere to an LBS. However, a quick meeting with Leonard Zinn and you won't be visiting the LBS very often. =)
  • 08-09-2007
    TheRam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by firstrax
    Buy some tools, learn how to wrench you bike.

    I've tinkered around with plenty of cheap bikes before, but since this is my first nice bike, I don't want to take any chances.

    On average, how much do shops charge for a full service? I want to get an idea so I don't get ripped off.


    Thanks!
  • 08-09-2007
    OneGear
    there's not a whole lot you can do to your bike that isn't reversible, short of some catastrophic wrenching. it will work out as long as you don't do something really stupid. in the long run its better if you can do it yourself.

    like another poster said, you don't owe them nothing, you are only there for school. if they give you attitude it's really not worth going there.
  • 08-09-2007
    gradosu
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheRam
    I've tinkered around with plenty of cheap bikes before, but since this is my first nice bike, I don't want to take any chances.

    On average, how much do shops charge for a full service? I want to get an idea so I don't get ripped off.


    Thanks!

    Sorry, i'm new to cycling and have never had my bike tuned at a shop. I also bought my bike from out of town and will be moving again shortly to go to grad school. I use these forums for most of my needs. Also, SRAM's webpage has some tech videos, while it is for SRAM specific components you get the idea about how to handle a bottom bracket or mess with the shifting. I even trued a badly out of whack rim a few weeks ago with a 3 dollar wrench spoke and my bike upside down as a truing stand. I think bikes are a lot more idiot proof than most people want you to believe. Remember grease is your best friend when installing stuff.
    Kick ass bike by the way.
    I've been to a shop where they have different service options available. They get pretty spendy pretty quick. it was something like 80 bucks to redo cables, adjust shifting and lube some stuff up. To me it sure sounds like anything short of a rebuilt wheel or repacking some difficult bearings is best done by yourself. Save the money, buy more beer.... nice beer.
  • 08-09-2007
    ddmiller67
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheRam
    What is the average tuning price and how often do you think I should take the bike in, assuming an average of 100 miles ridden per week.

    $45-$70 for a quick tuneup, $90-$140 for a pretty good overhaul. Anything other than a cables you should expect to pay extra for.

    You can clean and lube your chain yourself. If you keep the drivetrain free of grit and do a good job swabbing the grime off with damp rags, then once a year should be plenty.

    David
  • 08-09-2007
    SnowMongoose
    prices vary...
    just picked up my MTB from the shop today, and paid $75 for a general tune up, front brake rebuild, rear brake bleed, plus a new front brake bracket.

    wrenching isn't that bad, between books and the internet, you can do the vast majority of it yourself, for the one time cost of tools
  • 08-10-2007
    Rob P
    I dont think you'll have a problem with it at all. They're in the business to make money and if they don't want to service your bike go somewhere else.
  • 08-10-2007
    rbart4506
    Any tuning that's going to cost you $30-$40 is tuning you can do yourself. My wife and I both bought 07 Specialized Roubaix Expert's in the spring and they have around 5500km's on them. They have been back to the LBS for service exactly 0 times. All that I've needed to do is adjust the rear shifter cables, which is pretty easy to do. I'd go with everyone's advice of doing it yourself. The basic stuff is pretty straight forward.

    Most of the trips to the LBS have been for fitting issues and even in the end I finished the fine tuning myself.

    Really the best thing any serious cyclist can do is learn how to work on their bikes.
  • 08-10-2007
    TheRam
    Hi everyone,
    Thanks for the advice. I think I'll get some bike maintenance books and fully learn how to work on the bike.
  • 08-10-2007
    MR_GRUMPY
    For the first year or so, you will only have to fine tune the rear shifting and touch up the wheel truing. (that's if the bike was built correctly)
    Maybe $20 for each of these. I really don't know because I do all my own work.
    The most important things $ wise, is to make sure your cranks stay on tight and that your rear derailleur stop screws are set correctly. These things need to be checked after a month or so (maybe less)
  • 08-11-2007
    spyro
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheRam
    Hi everyone,
    Thanks for the advice. I think I'll get some bike maintenance books and fully learn how to work on the bike.

    Most good bike shops are happy to show you what they are doing if you ask. My bike goes in every couple of months, usually just to check chain wear and get the shifting tweeked.... I dont usually even get charged for that.
  • 08-12-2007
    TylerDurden
    you should get hooked up with the cycling team there. The site is www.illinicycling.com, and they'll have some people at quad day coming up. The road race season is in the spring, and although frigid at times, it's a blast. I'd say start riding with those guys/girls on group rides and get to know them. They can help you out with showing you some maintenance stuff, and for anything major you need, Champaign Cycle is a pretty good LBS. If I didn't just graduated (damnit damnit damnit) I'd see you out on the roads there pretty soon. Enjoy the flat, windy cornfields.
  • 08-12-2007
    TheRam
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TylerDurden
    you should get hooked up with the cycling team there. The site is www.illinicycling.com, and they'll have some people at quad day coming up. The road race season is in the spring, and although frigid at times, it's a blast. I'd say start riding with those guys/girls on group rides and get to know them. They can help you out with showing you some maintenance stuff, and for anything major you need, Champaign Cycle is a pretty good LBS. If I didn't just graduated (damnit damnit damnit) I'd see you out on the roads there pretty soon. Enjoy the flat, windy cornfields.

    Hi!
    Thanks for that advice. I don't know if I'm good enough to join the team yet, but I was planning on joining the prairie cycling club. Do you know anything about that club?
  • 08-12-2007
    Cheers!
    This website is all you ever need to for fixing your bike. Invest in some tools and you will be set for life. Unless Park Tools goes out of business and the website goes flunk.

    http://parktool.com/repair/
  • 08-13-2007
    TheRam
    Wow, that site is a gold mine. Thanks a lot!:thumbsup: