Looking for My First Real Bike - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by h.clakins View Post
    Thanks. I think I'll check it out. Thanks for all the advice.
    Take it for a ride, make sure it fits you well after adjusting the saddle height to your liking and it shifts well / brakes work well. Spin the wheels with the tire off the ground and look at them from the top while spinning - there should be no wobble to either front or back and should spin smoothly. Plink on the spokes with your finger nail and they should all make about the same sound if they are tensioned right. If it passes all of those checks it's pretty much good to ride probably. If not it may need a bit of work / adjusting so figure some money in for a shop to repair. Minor adjustments / wheel truing at most shops around here would be less than $75, depending on what needs to be done.

    Never be in a hurry to buy or sell - some of the best advice I was given when I was your age and I still follow it. If you don't like something, and it can be fixed, you can negotiate it in the price. If it's not something that can be fixed, don't feel pressured to buy, other bikes will show up for sure.
    Gravel Rocks

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  2. #27
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    Good to know. I'm going to go and see the bike this weekend.

  3. #28
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    DYh
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    That bike checks off all on your list, don't let it get away!
    LOL

    Amen 🙏

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have never used the drop part of my drop bars,... that is just too low for me..
    Huh? Oh my.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    Huh? Oh my.
    Some of us aren't that flexible.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #31
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    Whatever you get make sure it's the right size bike.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Methodical View Post
    Whatever you get make sure it's the right size bike.
    ^^^This.^^^

    Don't be lulled into getting a bike that doesn't fit quite right just because you love everything else about the bike. It may be tolerable on the test ride, but after you have it for awhile, you will wish you had something that fits better.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  8. #33
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    I looked up some fitting guides online and followed the steps. It has two inches of clearance standing over the top bar and the pedals are the right distance from the seat.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    ^^^This.^^^

    Don't be lulled into getting a bike that doesn't fit quite right just because you love everything else about the bike. It may be tolerable on the test ride, but after you have it for awhile, you will wish you had something that fits better.
    Says the man who can't utilize all of the positions his handlebars have to offer.
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Says the man who can't utilize all of the positions his handlebars have to offer.
    And what does this have to do with the advice I gave? The reason I don't use the drops is because of neck issues, not because of bad fit.

    Try again.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    And what does this have to do with the advice I gave? The reason I don't use the drops is because of neck issues, not because of bad fit.

    Try again.
    Then you have a bad fit. Raise your bars to make more positions available to you. Over the years my position has changed due to loss of flexibility, my bars have been raised and I've gone to taller bikes, both to keep all positions of my bars available to me. It's nice to have the drops available when fighting a head wind, or to just change position for a few miles. The tops are nice if just riding easy and looking around, or climbing. And the hoods and ramps are good for just eating miles, and so are the drops.

    Why set up a bicycle with drop bars that can give you 5\6 positions and only allow yourself the ability to use two. I don't know that that can be called a good fit.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Then you have a bad fit. Raise your bars to make more positions available to you. I've gone to taller bikes.
    Taller bike? In my condition, it would be impossible to be comfortable in the drops unless I used a steerer extension. I already have a 40 degree stem. It's not the bike fit, it's my stiff vertebrae and bulging discs. If I got a large enough frame to be that high in front, I would be neutering myself as soon as I straddled the top tube.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Taller bike? In my condition, it would be impossible to be comfortable in the drops unless I used a steerer extension. I already have a 40 degree stem. It's not the bike fit, it's my stiff vertebrae and bulging discs. If I got a large enough frame to be that high in front, I would be neutering myself as soon as I straddled the top tube.
    Then why a drop bar bike? There are plenty of good bikes more suitable for your anatomy, utilizing straight or swept back handlebars, that could work for you. I recently put Porteur style bars on my wives Univega Specialissima and she's very happy with it. Bar end shifters on the upright, swept back bars and she seems to enjoy it more every time she rides it. A lot of cyclists like moustache bars which have more hand positions than the Porteur or straight bars.

    As far as neutering yourself, unless your using Pit Bull pedals, you're probably only putting one foot down at stops and should have no fear of being neutered. Shucks, not only have I gone to a taller bike but my head tube has a 1 centimeter extension at the top, and it may be possible to get a 2cen extension.
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Then why a drop bar bike? There are plenty of good bikes more suitable for your anatomy, utilizing straight or swept back handlebars, that could work for you. I recently put Porteur style bars on my wives Univega Specialissima and she's very happy with it. Bar end shifters on the upright, swept back bars and she seems to enjoy it more every time she rides it. A lot of cyclists like moustache bars which have more hand positions than the Porteur or straight bars.

    As far as neutering yourself, unless your using Pit Bull pedals, you're probably only putting one foot down at stops and should have no fear of being neutered. Shucks, not only have I gone to a taller bike but my head tube has a 1 centimeter extension at the top, and it may be possible to get a 2cen extension.
    OK, I see where this is going. Carry on.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    OK, I see where this is going. Carry on.
    Where's it going? Why you getting your back up?

    You offer suggestions all over this forum, why are you taking offense to suggestions made to yourself?
    Too old to ride plastic

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Where's it going? Why you getting your back up?

    You offer suggestions all over this forum, why are you taking offense to suggestions made to yourself?
    Who is taking offense? I'm just noting your trolling.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Who is taking offense? I'm just noting your trolling.
    Trolling, why, because I suggest a different set up on your road bike? I've tried to support my opinion with examples that have worked for my wife and myself. You're not the only ne here who is injured or aging and losing mobility and all I've done is explained how changing bike fit has helped with flexibility issues here.

    Closest I've come to trolling here is a little poke at Pt Bull pedals.
    Too old to ride plastic

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by h.clakins View Post
    I looked up some fitting guides online and followed the steps. It has two inches of clearance standing over the top bar and the pedals are the right distance from the seat.
    Did you get the bike? Sizing is hugely important, as I discovered when I bought my first "real" bike. I got my first road bike thinking a 58 cm was close enough, mainly because I got the bike for a screaming deal. I rode it for two years and never got it set up to my liking. Two year of unhappiness. :-( I finally got rid of it and got the proper size, it makes all the difference in the world.
    Liars often accuse you of lying. - Steve Maraboli

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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Trolling, why, because I suggest a different set up on your road bike? I've tried to support my opinion with examples that have worked for my wife and myself. You're not the only ne here who is injured or aging and losing mobility and all I've done is explained how changing bike fit has helped with flexibility issues here.

    Closest I've come to trolling here is a little poke at Pt Bull pedals.
    OK, just checking since I was a little suspicious. My apologies.

    But I have to wonder about your comment regarding top tube height and stand over. While we may usually only take one foot out at stops, eventually, one has to straddle the bike - when getting on and off even if at no other time. Getting a top tube weggie isn't exactly fun. I did have a size 58 bike for awhile and was never happy with the fit - I had to slam the seatpost down as low as it could go, the top tube was into my nuts and the reach was too far even with the shortest stem I could find. A 56 is my correct size. A 54 feels cramped in the cockpit.
    Last edited by Lombard; 12-09-2019 at 08:28 AM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by davesupra View Post
    Did you get the bike?
    We need to know! Everyone here is emotionally invested at this point!

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    OK, just checking since I was a little suspicious. My apologies.

    But I have to wonder about your comment regarding top tube height and stand over. While we may usually only take one foot out at stops, eventually, one has to straddle the bike - when getting on and off even if at no other time. Getting a top tube weggie isn't exactly fun. I did have a size 58 bike for awhile and was never happy with the fit - I had to slam the seatpost down as low as it could go, the top tube was into my nuts and the reach was too far even with the shortest stem I could find. A 56 is my correct size. A 54 feels cramped in the cockpit.
    So far I haven't needed to "grow" the bike to the point that the TT is that high, but fit is more important when riding than not, you know that. When I had my bike built I specified an horizontal TT with the 1cen extension on the HT, but the frame started as a tigged sloping TT bike, steel. I've been riding that bike for about 4yrs, about 24000 miles, and if I was to do it again I'd go with a taller ST and shorter TT, keeping the reach where it is but using a longer stem. This would allow me to shorten and\or raise the stem as I grow progressively less flexible. This was not so much a custom bike but being built, by Waterford when ordered, allowed some latitude in things like tube length.

    I think that 2cen would put the TT into my knuts, but my seat post would still have a "fist" of clearance. and the stem would be close to slammed, giving me room to become less flexible. And I hope to do it over, but only time will tell.
    Too old to ride plastic

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