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  1. #1
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    Making sure that my bike won't fit me?

    I'm 5'9" and I bought a '15 supersix evo size 56. I used to ride a mountain bike, so I understand I have to adapt. Due to unseen circumstances, I wasnt able to test the bike before purchase.

    I've ridden it a few times, and I'm attaching a pic of where my hands are when I ride.

    When my hands are in position "A" (where I can hit the brakes), I feel that I'm leaning way too much and that there's too much weight on my hands. Just so you have an idea, the part of the palm With direct contact to the handlebar turn red from the weight and the awkward angle.

    I feel better in position "B", and I usually ride like this, but then the brakes are not readily accessible.

    With that said, any bike shop will charge me at least $30 just to tell me if the bike fits me, and if it does, then they will fit it at an additional cost.

    Is there a foolproof way to make sure that the bike will not fit me no matter how much it's fitted? I dont want to spend money on a fitting if I know beforehand that the size isnt for me.

    thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Making sure that my bike won't fit me?-you_doodle_2018-07-08t20_34_37z.jpg  
    Last edited by rbhatup; 07-08-2018 at 01:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    so you finally bought one eh?
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  3. #3
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    Just for giggles, when you say it’s a “56”, is it an effective top tube of 56 ?, or what ?. FWIW, I am 5’9 and also ride a 56 ETT, but I have a long torso. If it’s a 56 seat tube length, with a sloping top tube, or a real measured 56 sloped top tube, it might be a 57 or 58 ETT and that might be too big.

    Simple and quick solution would be to flip the stem. It looks like a +/-5 or 7.

    It’s currenly set angled down. Remove front cap and bar, loosen the steerer bolts, remove top stem cap, flip stem so it’s now +5 (or 7) up, install and tighten all.

    Try that for a bit. If it still feels like too much reach, buy a shorter stem, maybe with more rise.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Just for giggles, when you say it’s a “56”, is it an effective top tube of 56 ?, or what ?. FWIW, I am 5’9 and also ride a 56 ETT, but I have a long torso. If it’s a 56 seat tube length, with a sloping top tube, or a real measured 56 sloped top tube, it might be a 57 or 58 ETT and that might be too big.

    Simple and quick solution would be to flip the stem. It looks like a +/-5 or 7.

    It’s currenly set angled down. Remove front cap and bar, loosen the steerer bolts, remove top stem cap, flip stem so it’s now +5 (or 7) up, install and tighten all.

    Try that for a bit. If it still feels like too much reach, buy a shorter stem, maybe with more rise.
    that's not a picture of his bike.

    I question whether he really bought one.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    so you finally bought one eh?
    Yes, I bought a 2015 supersix evo, size 56.

  6. #6
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    No.

    This like many bike fit threads may just come down to tuning the frame you have with a shorter stem, zero offset post or both.

  7. #7
    ngl
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    I'm 5'9" and I bought a '15 supersix evo size 56. I used to ride a mountain bike, so I understand I have to adapt. Due to unseen circumstances, I wasnt able to test the bike before purchase.

    I've ridden it a few times, and I'm attaching a pic of where my hands are when I ride.

    When my hands are in position "A" (where I can hit the brakes), I feel that I'm leaning way too much and that there's too much weight on my hands. Just so you have an idea, the part of the palm With direct contact to the handlebar turn red from the weight and the awkward angle.

    I feel better in position "B", and I usually ride like this, but then the brakes are not readily accessible.

    With that said, any bike shop will charge me at least $30 just to tell me if the bike fits me, and if it does, then they will fit it at an additional cost.

    Is there a foolproof way to make sure that the bike will not fit me no matter how much it's fitted? I dont want to spend money on a fitting if I know beforehand that the size isnt for me.

    thanks.
    Didn't someone already advise you to take the bike to a bike shop ( for inspection and proper fit) BEFORE you purchase it! Why didn't you do it? See where penny pinching got you. Now you are asking for more advise that you are still not going to take.

  8. #8
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    Get a 50mm stem, that should get you close.

    Did you adj the saddle fore/aft?
    BANNED

  9. #9
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    op post a real picture of your new bike.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    Yes, I bought a 2015 supersix evo, size 56.
    sure ya did.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    I'm 5'9" and I bought a '15 supersix evo size 56. I used to ride a mountain bike, so I understand I have to adapt. Due to unseen circumstances, I wasnt able to test the bike before purchase.

    I've ridden it a few times, and I'm attaching a pic of where my hands are when I ride.

    When my hands are in position "A" (where I can hit the brakes), I feel that I'm leaning way too much and that there's too much weight on my hands. Just so you have an idea, the part of the palm With direct contact to the handlebar turn red from the weight and the awkward angle.

    I feel better in position "B", and I usually ride like this, but then the brakes are not readily accessible.

    With that said, any bike shop will charge me at least $30 just to tell me if the bike fits me, and if it does, then they will fit it at an additional cost.

    Is there a foolproof way to make sure that the bike will not fit me no matter how much it's fitted? I dont want to spend money on a fitting if I know beforehand that the size isnt for me.

    thanks.
    You know where the people who have the expertise to help you are. Either pay them for their time and expertise, or just start ordering shorter stems and hoping one of them feels ok.

    FWIW, I'd charge you $100, but only if I could make your bike fit. If someone pays me for even our basic fit service, they're leaving with a bike that's comfortable.

  12. #12
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    Eh.... why not.

    90 degrees is a common starting point referring to the position of your arms to your torso/back with your shoulder as a pivot point and your hands on the hoods.

    Every rider needs to find whats comfy for them. Coming from a mountain bike you may want the handlebars higher and closer in. This may affect the feel of the bike on a descent (wobbly and doesnt ride corners on a rail)

    You probably have back/shoulder muscles that you are not used to using from the higher position of the flatbar on a mountain bike. Over time you will get stronger and more used to the weight on your hands. Buy a good pair of gel gloves.

    And just search some GCN videos. Very helpful and entertaining.

    https://youtu.be/1VYhyppWTDc

    -Sean


    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  13. #13
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    Lance is 5'9-10" rode a Trek size 58cm with 130mm stem throughout his career which much longer reach than you.

    Common to feel stretched out coming off a mtb when transitioning to a road bike.

    A 56 is a workable size with standard stem for your body size. Some will ride a 54 but I have fitted many your size on a 56.

    If you want really good feedback than get on your bike, lean against the wall and have a s/o take a cell pic of you in profile and post it. Cardinal newb mistake is sitting on the saddle like a park bench or closer to how you sit on your mtb saddle with handlebar likely closer vertically t your saddle height with handlebar closer in. Aerodynamics are more important on a road bike because speed is higher. So not how you sit...or rather should sit on a road bike. If you rotate your pelvis and sit on your saddle on the rails of your ramus forward of your sit bones versus sitbones with wider spacing...your reach will magically shrink because your effective back length increases by rotating your torso more horizontal. When you stick your bum out to ride the bike properly you will also move your CG back which will take more weight off your hands.

    In summary, the bike is probably fine for you without a stem change but you are sitting on it wrong which btw is the most common newb mistake. A road bike isn't sat on like a cruiser. That is why the saddle in narrower because Ramus of yourpelvis narrows as you rotate your pelvis properly. For proper pelvis position, get out of the saddle when riding, stick your bum out and then sit back down. Btw, its an acquired taste...you need to find the right saddle to work with this more rotated forward position.

    Lance who is your body size on a bigger bike with greater reach. For a top rider he is a bit of an outlier and more old school with more upright torso than most in the modern peloton. But a great amateur position to emulate for combination of comfort and speed without too much weight on the hands that works better for heavier amateurs not as fit as elite cyclists. Everybody btw is heavier than elite cyclists.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Making sure that my bike won't fit me?-lances-roadbike-position.jpg  
    Last edited by 11spd; 07-09-2018 at 02:50 AM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Cardinal newb mistake is sitting on the saddle like a park bench or closer to how you sit on your mtb saddle with handlebar likely closer vertically t your saddle height with handlebar closer in.
    This is why a good fitter will put you and your bike on a trainer and have you pedal rather than just have you sit on the bike.

    I agree with Masont. A good shop WILL charge you between $100-200 for a fit BUT only if they can fit you correctly. That is money well spent. What isn't money well spent is to pay $30 just to find out IF they can fit you.

    To the OP, find a different shop worthy of your business.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    I'm 5'9" and I bought a '15 supersix evo size 56.

    When my hands are in position "A" (where I can hit the brakes), I feel that I'm leaning way too much and that there's too much weight on my hands.
    I'm 5'9" and I ride a Supersix 56. Fits me just fine. But that's me. At 5'9" you're probably between a 54 & 56 and it'd depend on your proportions and riding style.

    If you feel there's too much weight on your hands, you might have poor core strength.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    If you feel there's too much weight on your hands, you might have poor core strength.
    This is a good probability. Planks will solve this for the most part and may prevent back issues down the road:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASdvN_XEl_c

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynUw0YsrmSg
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  17. #17
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    Go to slowtwitch.com and post a picture of yourself riding it (a video would be even better).

    You'll get some true industry experts giving you advice. About as useful as you can get on the internet, and probably more useful than what you'd get in many shops.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Lance is 5'9-10" rode a Trek size 58cm with 130mm stem throughout his career which much longer reach than you.
    Where did you find this?

    I always heard he was 5'11 and rode a 56.

    Regardless, with two fused vertebrae and the worst looking position you can find in the peloton, his position is not something you want to replicate.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Where did you find this?

    I always heard he was 5'11 and rode a 56.
    Regardless, with two fused vertebrae and the worst looking position you can find in the peloton, his position is not something you want to replicate.
    Doesn't make it concrete in anyway, but I too read in multiple articles that Lance was <5'10" and rode a 58 frame. The above picture doesn't do his position justice but he was always stretcheeed out, Orbee style.

    To OP and all newbs, keep in min that your choice of handlebar and shifting system (SRAM, Shimano) can vary the reach much more drastically than most stem changes. Bars differ 20-30mm in reach and Shimano hoods are much larger and longer than SRAM hoods.

    OP I was once where you were. I can tell based on the questions that you are asking, that you have a LOOOOONG way to go before you crack this puzzle. There is so much more to this that you just don't understand yet. Starting with tube geometries and their effect on ETT length to natural arm drop, weight distribution, fore aft, and on and on and on.... at this rate, I suspect you will ride around in discomfort until late 2019 before giving in.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  20. #20
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    I am always perplexed by people here who give advice based on what pros do. This could not be more wrong. A good fit for Lance or Eddie Merckx will probably be a lousy fit for the rest of us.

    Bikes that are marketed as multi-time Tour de France winners sell to naive people who believe that the bike that Lance rode will make them ride faster. I doubt any of us here are in that league.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Where did you find this?

    I always heard he was 5'11 and rode a 56.

    Regardless, with two fused vertebrae and the worst looking position you can find in the peloton, his position is not something you want to replicate.
    Where did I find it? Lance's position and bike size is perhaps more talked about than any rider in history.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Making sure that my bike won't fit me?-lance-armstrong.jpg  

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I am always perplexed by people here who give advice based on what pros do. This could not be more wrong. A good fit for Lance or Eddie Merckx will probably be a lousy fit for the rest of us.

    Bikes that are marketed as multi-time Tour de France winners sell to naive people who believe that the bike that Lance rode will make them ride faster. I doubt any of us here are in that league.
    LOL. There is a reason you are perplexed, you miss the point and don't know much about fit. Lance throughout his career rode closer to an amateur fit with exception of a bit less saddle setback and a tad more reach than any top rider in history including Merckx who also didn't ride very slammed.

    If more guys rode closer to Lance's fit in the 5'10" range, they would be much more comfortable than riding more traditional slammed pro small frame position. I am 6'1" and ride a scaled up Lance position and am completely comfortable on the bike.
    Lance rode closer to a French fit than an Eddy fit which would suit a vast no. of recreational cyclists.

    That is the point lost on you.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    That is the point lost on you.
    When I pull up to a cafe of LBS the amount of bikes I see with seats slammed all the way back on the rails and +15 90mm stems is outrageous. It's not even the stems but the amount of seats that are all the way back on the rails is so prevalent I wonder if they are built differently. No wonder they sit and mash the pedals needing to take breaks frequently. You gotta sit ON the seat not bench style... slide that sucker forward, lower it, bring pelvis forward and amazingly... your seat to bar drop can be increased by 1" if not more quite comfortably. Gone is the wonky stem, the pedaling from behind the crank and the need to have bars level with seat.

    It all starts with those damn seats that are slammed back on the rails.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    When I pull up to a cafe of LBS the amount of bikes I see with seats slammed all the way back on the rails and +15 90mm stems is outrageous. It's not even the stems but the amount of seats that are all the way back on the rails is so prevalent I wonder if they are built differently. No wonder they sit and mash the pedals needing to take breaks frequently. You gotta sit ON the seat not bench style... slide that sucker forward, lower it, bring pelvis forward and amazingly... your seat to bar drop can be increased by 1" if not more quite comfortably. Gone is the wonky stem, the pedaling from behind the crank and the need to have bars level with seat.

    It all starts with those damn seats that are slammed back on the rails.
    It certainly can start there. Lance for example doesn't ride with much saddle setback...but monsters like Hincappie and Boonen sure did with massive setback. But they have 80cm saddle height as well.

    But you are right about being a sucker to a slammed saddle all the way back. Puts more pressure on the perineum when rotating the pelvis.

    Biggest mistake I see with amateur riders and 60% of the riders on the road I see with poor fit is...for lower level of fitness and flexibility, too much drop which renders the drops less usable and not enough reach and too much weight on the hands.

    Here is a great article penned by amateur bike racer Danno a few years back:
    https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycl...umb-hands.html
    Last edited by 11spd; 07-09-2018 at 06:30 AM.

  25. #25
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    If you want it to fit right get a proper bike fit.

    If you want to just be kind of ok then read some fit threads and posts and wing it by feel. I did 6000 miles on my first road bike with a fit by reading and feel. It was ok. For my new bike I got a proper fit and it better. More power, less fatigue and more comfort. All marginally so, but it nice to know I am doing better now.
    Joe
    Road Bike - Specialized Venge | MTB - 2018 Specialized Epic - Vassago Verhauen Steel SS - 2013 Santa Cruz 5010

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