Is my bike too big?
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  1. #1
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    Is my bike too big?

    Hi all. I would really appreciate your advice. I bought a new bike from a very reputable shop. Availability is a bit poor at the moment but they told me this would be the right size. I'm 6'3, the cannondale website suggests this is suitable for someone 6'5-6'9. Doe this look too big for me? I can drop the front by 3 spacers worth and the seat is at it's most forward. Thanks!!!

    i
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  2. #2
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    Your seat height looks good; you have a reasonable amount of seatpost extension, your reach to the bars looks fine, and the handlebar drop is not excessive. I'd say you're good.

    Maybe after thousands of miles of riding you could graduate to a longer stem but for now you're fine.

    That arm position in the second photo however, I just don't get. Nobody rides like that so the position is irrelevant.

  3. #3
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    Great. thanks for the response, that's pretty encouraging!
    Yeah, that would be a brave position to take ha. It's because I'm going to get some tri-bars for it and wanted to check out that positioning.

    thanks!

  4. #4
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    I don't think it looks too big for you. Looks in the ballpark.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    That arm position in the second photo however, I just don't get. Nobody rides like that so the position is irrelevant.
    People ride like that all the time.


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  5. #5
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    You're either comfortable or not. I suppose pictures would expose glaring red flags, and I don't see any, but without factoring your flexibility, type of riding, core strength and how you'd look actually pedaling on the road a visual taken inside shouldn't answer the question for you.

    Ride it and see how you feel. It does look like a good starting point so you should be able to tweak it to your body, and/or an experienced fitter, tells you to.

  6. #6
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    The first thing you should do is post a picture with the pedal at the 3 oclock position from the right side. That would be a good starting picture.
    Have you rode much? It looks like the bike is about right, to me your flexiblity looks not so good. Your elbows looked locked.
    Start with the stretching immediately.

    And I ride in the second picture sometimes, but I have aerobars (more comfortable).
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  7. #7
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    yeah it feels pretty good over the first couple of rides. I want to drop the front a bit but other than that it feels okay.
    I would definitely be on my arse if I rode it like that!

  8. #8
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    Thanks. My elbow isn't locked but is fairly straight.
    My back is a bit tight and definitely needs some work.
    Is this what you mean? thoughts, thanks:

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  9. #9
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    Great pick. KneeOverPedal looks good (only a good place to start, not the end all answer).

    IMO, if you ride with your elbows locked like that, you need a shorter stem & more flexiblity.

    Overall, IMO, you are very close, ride-it.

    Your color accents are very similar to mine, but I went 'lime green'.
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  10. #10
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    Thanks. It's reassuring to hear that!
    My elbows aren't quite locked but probably could do with a little more bend. I feel like i need to work on the flex in my back but will see how I get on!
    Lime green sounds good. I'm a little disappointed with the grey so might brighten these up at some point.

  11. #11
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    Take this with a grain of salt... I've dealt with too large of a bike issues on my last bike. I even had a fit from a well regarded fitter in town who works at a local shop. The size he recommended for me was too large.

    If you are concerned about the fit, I would find an other reputable fitter in your area and go to them - not the shop you purchased the bike from - for an evaluation - second opinion.

    Is it too large? It really depends on your riding and how you feel on the bike. Do you experience any issues after an hour or 2 on the bike. Now if you are fine don't experience any issues when riding, then great likely no need to adjust. Ignore the rest of this post and go enjoy riding your new bike.

    One thing to look out for that I have experienced is excessive weight on the hands and upper body. Do you feel you have excessive weight on your hands? Do you need to readjust often to alleviate pressure or prevent numbness? Do your shoulders and upper back get tired after an hour or two on the bike? Those would be symptoms of possibly being too stretched out on the bike with too much weight on the front of the bike. It can mean you moved the saddle forward to lessen the reach moving more weight forward. One solution is to move the seat back but that will stretch you out more so you will have to change the reach to the bars to compensate. Usually raising the stem. Shortening the stem. Changing the handlebar to a narrower one or one with shorter reach or both.

    So... a potential red flag is that you have have your seat slammed all the way forward. Unless the post has some setback and you can move to a in-line/zero setback post, you won't be able to more the saddle any more forward if you needed to shorten the reach. This is the situation I found myself in and one the fitter didn't comment on or notice.

    Hard to tell from but the pic with your pedals at 9 and 3 almost hint at a pretty forward position. You appear to be more on top of or in front of the pedals than behind. If that is the case it could affect how much your hamstrings are being engaged in your pedal stroke and indicates a possible forward weight distribution like I described above.

    Be aware that by lowering your bar height, you will effectively be lengthening your reach if you do not change anything else.

    If you are interested there's a lot of fit information on line and some good youtube series are easy to watch and learn from. It's a huge rabbit hole if you decided to go down it!

    Bike Fitting Series with Neil Stanbury from Cam Nicholls channel from Australia - very informative - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL1_j_gcxtpxJ-b9ptUikhStxEvkm1V7E

    Bike Fit Tuesdays: from Francis Cade with with James from bicycle. in Richmond England -informative but not that detailed usually but entertaining - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMZ241fyVfiv3eAJ4UYkzeb2JltpLSlzs

    Bike Fit Advisor - from the US - good detailed info but older videos may be not as current with latest fit trends - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr4...L1xJb4A/videos

    If you want to obsess about your fit and numbers and angles etc. There is a great site for uploading video that you can do overlays and check your self.

    https://www.motionysis.com/video/

  12. #12
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    Saddle height looks a little to high to me, but the frame looks like a good size fit from the rest of the pictures.

    And I do know a few guys that ride with their forearms on the bars, it's not common but certainly not unheard of.
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  13. #13
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    The OP has quite a bit of drop on his bars.

    I don't have real good flexiblity, and I always get larger than normal bikes because the top of head tube is higher, ergo, not much drop. Then put a really short stem on it to bring the bars back to me, and of course my seat post is pretty short too. May be the wrong way, but all my bikes are like that.

    But having another prof opinion is always worth more than mine.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Saddle height looks a little to high to me, but the frame looks like a good size fit from the rest of the pictures.

    And I do know a few guys that ride with their forearms on the bars, it's not common but certainly not unheard of.
    I am going to second the seat being a bit high.

    OP, you will be AMAZED at the difference in functional reach when you lower a seat to its correct position. When the seat is too high your midsection tightens up as your body works to stabilize itself on the seat, your arms are used to brace against the bar as opposed to lightly draped over the hoods.

    Lower that seat by 3mm go for a ride and let us know what feels different. I bet you *will* feel a difference.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesbr View Post
    Hi all. I would really appreciate your advice. I bought a new bike from a very reputable shop. Availability is a bit poor at the moment but they told me this would be the right size. I'm 6'3, the cannondale website suggests this is suitable for someone 6'5-6'9. Doe this look too big for me? I can drop the front by 3 spacers worth and the seat is at it's most forward. Thanks!!!

    i

    I would lower that saddle by quite a bit, a heck of a lot more than 3mm, since your legs are practically straight when the pedal is at the bottom of the stroke. Contrary to popular belief, there needs to be more than just a little bend in the knee when fully extended. You need to be able to engage the hamstrings for the entire pedal stroke.

    A good idea is start with a saddle that's too low. Go for a ride and bring an allen wrench with you. During the ride, stop and slowly raise the saddle a few mm at a time. At some point you will feel entirely comfortable, a sweet spot where your legs are fully engaged for the entire stroke. It's usually lower than you might think.

  16. #16
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    Looking at it again I think the same regarding the saddle likely being too high. It looks like your legs are quite extended.

    Good video on setting seat height: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNGM...km1V7E&index=2

    Neill Stanbury discussing seat height. I like that he discusses the effects of too high and too low saddle height. Essentially slightly too high is worse than slightly too low. It doesn't take much too high extension to negatively impact you while you have to go much lower (relatively) to likely be significantly impacted.

    Just remember before you change anything - record all your measurements as a base line and a point to return to if a change negatively affects you. Also if you make any kind of significant change go easy for at least a couple of weeks or a month to let your body adapt to the changes.

  17. #17
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    I agree that too high a seat can create a lot of issues. I too went through a period of 'toohighIis'.
    Definitely lower the seat height to the point where you can spin out at high cadence without you butt bouncing on the seat.

    IMO, fitting is not about how you look, it's about how your mechanical connection to the bike is functioning.

    It is not "Form over Function"!
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-theory View Post
    Go for a ride and bring an allen wrench with you. During the ride, stop and slowly raise the saddle a few mm at a time.
    ^ This. Nothing beats the actual ride test.

    As for the saddle fore-aft distance, it's also important to get the saddle tilt angle proper even before adjusting the fore-aft. Saddle can be far enough back but if the tilt is down at the nose, that fore-aft won't work.

  19. #19
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    I'm not sure you are able to on this forum but if you can post a video of you riding on a trainer.
    Seeing a video will be tons more helpful than still pictures.
    In a video you can see the knee angle at the top and bottom position.
    Also post a video from the back. I'm guessing your hips are rocking with the current seat height
    And lose the sweatshirt. Much easier to see position in cycling bibs and jersey

  20. #20
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    These should give you a better idea of what you are looking for with knee angle
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  21. #21
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    The bike frame does not look particularly "..too big .."

    The concern you express and questions you ask, do however indicate your doubts about fit. This is both good and not so good.

    Good because Fit Is Important on a road bike.
    Bad because you are low on the fit learning curve, haven't ridden this bike much, and are grasping for answers to the right fit.

    I don't understand why you would want to remove spacers under your stem if you feared your bike too large, or lack flexibility and seek more confidence with your fit.

    You seem to me; to want affirmation and help from strangers offering advice on your living room wall ride.
    I'd recommend a Bike Fit, and go from there.
    Last edited by rudge66; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:28 PM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by M-theory View Post
    I would lower that saddle by quite a bit, a heck of a lot more than 3mm, since your legs are practically straight when the pedal is at the bottom of the stroke. Contrary to popular belief, there needs to be more than just a little bend in the knee when fully extended.
    ^This.^

    At the bottom of your stroke, your knee angle should be somewhere between 20 and 30 degrees. Your leg is too straight right now which will cause your hips to rock as you pedal.
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  23. #23
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    Nothing wrong with bike fit threads... but this one's certified goofy .
    rotate avatar left for correct road fit position

  24. #24
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    Does this bike make me look fat????
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  25. #25
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    Please don't strike comparisons with a Pro and somehow connect that to a normal sports rider who would go home with saddle sores 2" long if they rode that way.

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