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  1. #26
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    The pics you posted in garage are telling: heres my take away...

    The seat angle is not normal for most riders.
    The seat fore /aft looks all the way forward. Thats unacceptable .
    The handle bar tilt is incorrect, and too high.

    The above taken in sum, indicates you did not have a (competent ) fit.
    Or the bike frame is improperly sized.

    I wonder if you bought the bike from REI?

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    The pics you posted in garage are telling: heres my take away...

    The seat angle is not normal for most riders.
    The seat fore /aft looks all the way forward. Thats unacceptable .
    The handle bar tilt is incorrect, and too high.

    The above taken in sum, indicates you did not have a (competent ) fit.
    Or the bike frame is improperly sized.

    I wonder if you bought the bike from REI?
    I bought it from a local shop, they've been in business 35 years and they did the fit. You have me wondering why they would set it up this way. Perhaps the frame is too big? The saddle isn't the most comfortable.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  3. #28
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    I don't know your body measurements other than height. Nor do I know your frame size.
    Your inseam, and standover would be where I would first start to address that.

    Your wondering is good as many small adjustments will soon come into play as you ride and adapt, your body will tell you.

    Dont expect the seat to be too comfortable if the fit is not yet dialed in.
    Keep in mind your rump is a bit like a command control central, that reveals a lot about other body relationships on the bike.


    Just to confirm is the seat pushed way forward on the rails, that would be a major concern.

    The more information you give the more folks can help in this thread.
    Back to my query re the primary ride surface ... im still curious.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    I don't know your body measurements other than height. Nor do I know your frame size.
    Your inseam, and standover would be where I would first start to address that.

    Your wondering is good as many small adjustments will soon come into play as you ride and adapt, your body will tell you.

    Dont expect the seat to be too comfortable if the fit is not yet dialed in.
    Keep in mind your rump is a bit like a command control central, that reveals a lot about other body relationships on the bike.


    Just to confirm is the seat pushed way forward on the rails, that would be a major concern.

    The more information you give the more folks can help in this thread.
    Back to my query re the primary ride surface ... im still curious.
    Primary road surface is mixed, I'll be riding to the roads that aren't paved, areas that are too far or not enough time I'll drive to. My inseam is 35" stand over is 33". There bike is an XL, I can measure anything to help you help me. Your input is greatly appreciated.

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  5. #30
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    Frame size is fine.
    how about the seat angle and fore position on the rail?
    The drops look tilted a bit high. too, — but a torque wrench
    and hex allen will soon be your friend.

    BTW great components on your new bike.

  6. #31
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    Here are some pics, luckily I have tools, what I lack is know how.

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  7. #32
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    Yeah , it appears that your saddle is maxed out in a forward position on the rails.
    Also your saddle clamp mount has a two bolt adjustment. Both must be loosened to make a change in nose angle, or fore -aft adjustments. This style of saddle rail mount requires some patients to properly dial in. After a few times though, you'll get the hang of it.
    If the seat remains that far forward you will cancel any absorption compliance (comfort ) of the seat design.

    The bar tilt angle needs to conform to your wrist angle (straight) position
    while riding. There maybe adjustments to this as well in your future.

    Enjoy some back roads. Where do you ride?
    Last edited by rudge66; 04-08-2019 at 06:13 AM.

  8. #33
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    Don't take fit advice from people on the Internet who have never seen you on the bike, and are more concerned about the bike fitting some unrealistic ideal aesthetic than they are for how you fit on the bike.

  9. #34
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    You want the saddle to be level. Also, most folks don't have it pushed up so far. Do you feel bunched up on the bike? I'd take it back to the shop and have them adjust the saddle. Feels uncomfortable? It is going to take some time before you get used to sitting on a bike saddle for an extended time period. Get some padded shorts. That said, most off the rack bikes come with cheap saddles. Unfortunately, saddle fit is pretty subjective. What one person hates, another may love. Think about getting some pedals and shoes. They are a must have item as are shorts.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    Yeah , it appears that your saddle is maxed out in a forward position on the rails.
    It's beyond maxed out. It's gone past the manufacturer recommended limit of clamp mounting area. If that's what it takes to fit comfortably, something wasn't done right to begin with.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    Don't take fit advice from people on the Internet who have never seen you on the bike, and are more concerned about the bike fitting some unrealistic ideal aesthetic than they are for how you fit on the bike.
    Au contraire... there are plenty of sound, extremely helpful suggestions and advice to help you with your fit. And yes its on the internet, sometimes even in bike forums.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    Don't take fit advice from people on the Internet who have never seen you on the bike, and are more concerned about the bike fitting some unrealistic ideal aesthetic than they are for how you fit on the bike.
    ^^^^^This.^^^^^
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    ]I was looking into gravel/adventure bikes, but a lbs owner said I didn't need that bc 90% of my riding will be on the road.


    Now, this strikes me as rather odd. Did the LBS Owner just pull this out of his hat so to speak, or was it base on a conversation, and information you provided?

    I haven't yet found in this thread information about your intended riding surface. I do see you were considering a gravel/adventure bike. Why?

    My point is; I hope that bike is not for the road, and is used for 90% dirt, gravel, stone, surfaces.

    If you think you can simply swap tires to say 28mm for the road, .. what you will have then, is a bike that is not intended for the road. The oversized front fork, as well as the tall head tube, and geometry, will be like wearing ski boots to the beach.

    Id like to know more about your primary riding surface.
    Wrong. I think he made a great choice with the Topstone. Smooth slick tires and not even narrower tires will make that bike plenty road worthy. Unless you are racing, being a half a mile per hour slower won't matter.

    Congrats Keven! Ride the heck out of it and enjoy!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    Don't take fit advice from people on the Internet who have never seen you on the bike, and are more concerned about the bike fitting some unrealistic ideal aesthetic than they are for how you fit on the bike.
    you should trust people on the internet at least as much as some mope at an LBS that thought that saddle fore/aft adjustment was proper...
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    you should trust people on the internet at least as much as some mope at an LBS that thought that saddle fore/aft adjustment was proper...
    Hmmm, you have a point there. Chances are that shop didn't even check his fit.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    It's beyond maxed out. It's gone past the manufacturer recommended limit of clamp mounting area. If that's what it takes to fit comfortably, something wasn't done right to begin with.
    Yeah, that’s funky. Makes me think something is amiss. I wonder how long that bike was on the floor?
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  17. #42
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    They built it up out of the box the day before, they had a medium out on the floor. The saddle was moved when he was doing a quick fit for me, he said my body has uncommon proportions.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Ride the heck out of it and enjoy!
    After reinstalling the saddle.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    ]
    My point is; I hope that bike is not for the road, and is used for 90% dirt, gravel, stone, surfaces.

    If you think you can simply swap tires to say 28mm for the road, .. what you will have then, is a bike that is not intended for the road. The oversized front fork, as well as the tall head tube, and geometry, will be like wearing ski boots to the beach.

    Id like to know more about your primary riding surface.
    Naw man. That fork will work fine on the road. 28 or 32 mm shallow tread tires would work fine.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    Don't take fit advice from people on the Internet who have never seen you on the bike, and are more concerned about the bike fitting some unrealistic ideal aesthetic than they are for how you fit on the bike.
    BS. We've got a great picture of the bike as set up. Read what other riders are offering, and learn.

    That saddle is tilted slightly down. The bars are same level as saddle, so he won't be leaning forward all that much, putting weight on the arm and taking it off his butt. So he'll be sliding forward to the lowest point on the saddle. You want the lowest point to be mid-saddle, not on the nose.

    Level that thing and move it back, rails centered on the clamp. Its too weak a connection all the way forward and won't reliably support a 190# rider bouncing up and down.

    Rider has 33" inseam. He won't have any problem getting his knees within KOPS above the BB. His upper legs can't be so short the saddle has to be all the way forward. It's pretty high out of the seat tube, so the frame is not too big. He should tilt the bars like rudge and I suggested above. Common sense. No need to complicate the issue or appeal to the pros. The pictures shows the fitter didn't know what he was doing.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 04-08-2019 at 10:27 PM.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Naw man. That fork will work fine on the road. 28 or 32 mm shallow tread tires would work fine.
    Exactly. Even 36mm slick tires will move pretty fast.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #47
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    error, paste post duplicate.
    Last edited by rudge66; 04-14-2019 at 12:50 PM.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Wrong. I think he made a great choice with the Topstone. Smooth slick tires and not even narrower tires will make that bike plenty road worthy. Unless you are racing, being a half a mile per hour slower won't matter.

    Congrats Keven! Ride the heck out of it and enjoy!
    Brothers, Are we not called to serve members in need ?

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Pr...c-16a9317b9111

    Read with me from the words of Our Creator: Topstone is pure gravel goodness...
    With its high-volume tires, confident rider position and sporty handling, it is ready to smash out big miles on the backroads, explore routes less travelled, or smooth out the chop on your morning commute.

    So as we are called to service, some bikes are, "do all and do everything".
    Others are called for one requirement.
    Some are weak and confused (Muppet) and Some doubt;( PLB )
    Others are confident and strong.

    Gravel is a specific requirement. And Off Road; for we all know well, what our surface is ... is not the road.

    Let us not deceive Brother Kevin16 into thinking he holds between his loin and sits upon a road intended bike. He chose a Gravel Build.
    High Stack ,Tall Head Tube, Massive Fork Clearance.. this is not a road build. He will not ride well the road.

    Does a Bull give suck to its young ? Can a Bull run on a road?
    Indeed Brother Lombard .
    And to Apostel Fedrico whom I love, is not the front legs of an Ox
    built for a purpose ? Is a Deer not able to climb?

    Brother Kevin purchased a Gravel Bike. I refer you to our oath and service.
    Gravel bikes are not the same as Road Bikes,. if you ride the road , you will find the difference between a do everything gravel grinder... and a road specific bike.

    If you ride the road you will know your bike purpose. A Road Bike has a specific relationship to your ability to accept the road.

    This bike is not a Road Bike.
    Gravel Grinder Yes ... Do all Yes.. OFF Road Yes, Dirt Worthy ..Yes
    Road Bike ?... NO
    Last edited by rudge66; 04-09-2019 at 09:49 PM.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    Brothers, Are we not called to serve members in need ?

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Pr...c-16a9317b9111

    Read with me from the words of Our Creator: Topstone is pure gravel goodness...
    With its high-volume tires, confident rider position and sporty handling, it is ready to smash out big miles on the backroads, explore routes less travelled, or smooth out the chop on your morning commute.

    So as we are called to service, some bikes are, "do all and do everything".
    Others are called for one requirement.
    Some are weak and confused (Muppet) and Some doubt;( PLB )
    Others are confident and strong.

    Gravel is a specific requirement. And Off Road; for we all know well, what our surface is ... is not the road.

    Let us not deceive Brother Kevin16 into thinking he holds between his loin and sits upon a road intended bike. He chose a Gravel Build.
    High Stack ,Tall Head Tube, Massive Fork Clearance.. this is not a road build. He will not ride well the road.

    Does a Bull give suck to its young ? Can a Bull run on a road?
    Indeed Brother Lombard .
    And to Apostel Fedrico whom I love, is not the front legs of an Ox
    built for a purpose ? Is a Deer not able to climb?

    Brother Kevin purchased a Gravel Bike. I refer you to our oath and service.
    Gravel bikes are not the same as Road Bikes,. if you ride the road , you will find the difference between a do everything gravel grinder... and a road specific bike.

    If you ride the road you will know your bike purpose. A Road Bike has a specific relationship to your ability to accept the road.

    This bike is not a Road Bike.
    Gravel Grinder Yes ... Do all Yes.. OFF Road Yes, Dirt Worthy ..Yes
    Road Bike ?... NO
    Your word salad is noted.

    Did you not read the part of that web page where it says "On-road, off-road, any road"? You are forcing an issue that doesn't make any sense.

    As I said before, unless Kevin is racing or needs every bit of speed he can get, putting supple road slicks on this bike will serve him just fine for paved road riding.

    These would serve him well:

    Strada Bianca

    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    Brothers, Are we not called to serve members in need ?


    Yes, and I am called to dispel misinformation by other posters here.


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin.holz.16 View Post
    They built it up out of the box the day before, they had a medium out on the floor. The saddle was moved when he was doing a quick fit for me, he said my body has uncommon proportions.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    No snarky meant at all... That saddle rail/clamp relationship needs to be fixed. I have uncommon proportions as well btw. You might need a setback seatpost? I have 2 searposts for my principal road bike, one setback and one straight. Your form and needs will change over time. You are prolly not looking a big investment.... I mean new to cycling is closer to a cocaine habit than riding a bicycle in terms of money... I would NOT use the same fitter again.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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