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Thread: No computer???

  1. #1
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    No computer???

    Does anyone ride without a computer?

    I'm finding that I'm not using my computer very much anymore. I'm also enjoying my riding a lot more. I'm not worried about how fast I'm going, what my average speed is or how far I've gone.

    I'm riding more and enjoying it much more, but I couldn't tell you my peak cadence, average heart rate or how long I was in my optimum zone. This can't possibly be right.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbeerthepirate View Post
    Does anyone ride without a computer?

    I'm finding that I'm not using my computer very much anymore. I'm also enjoying my riding a lot more. I'm not worried about how fast I'm going, what my average speed is or how far I've gone.

    I'm riding more and enjoying it much more, but I couldn't tell you my peak cadence, average heart rate or how long I was in my optimum zone. This can't possibly be right.
    Yes and No. I do use a computer most of the time. However, when I feel burned out on training I will often just leave the computer at home. I just went almost 2 months with no computer and the result was great. I was riding more often and worrying less about the numbers. It was great. For the last couple of weeks I have drifted back to using a Garmin Edge 500, as nice as not worrying about the data is, it is pretty fun to analyze as well.

    In the end, a computer is not a necessary piece of cycling equipment. If it works for you, use it. If you aren't feeling it, leave it at home.

  3. #3
    What the what???
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    I have to admit I like to know how fast I'm going and how far I've traveled... even though the numbers usually depress me.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy... wait.

  4. #4
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    The only time I miss a computer (I generally ride without) is on group rides following a cue sheet with many turns. But I can still manage that pretty well. (I should note that I often have others in my groups who do ride with computers, so I have a pretty clear idea of numbers at the end - that is the best of both worlds!)

    I find I end up riding stronger without a computer, and enjoy it more, too. It keeps the act pure, instead of a means to an end. And in the end, it's all about the ride, not the numbers!

  5. #5
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    I rode without one for about a month, and my fitness really suffered. I went hard as ever on the hills, but on the flats I tooled around at like 16mph the whole time. I guess I need the computer as a reminder of how hard I should be trying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by champamoore View Post
    The only time I miss a computer (I generally ride without) is on group rides following a cue sheet with many turns. But I can still manage that pretty well. (I should note that I often have others in my groups who do ride with computers, so I have a pretty clear idea of numbers at the end - that is the best of both worlds!)

    I find I end up riding stronger without a computer, and enjoy it more, too. It keeps the act pure, instead of a means to an end. And in the end, it's all about the ride, not the numbers!
    Exactly.

    I'm not riding to hit a number now. Just riding because it's fun!

  7. #7
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    ... the only time I generally don't use one is during a TT... instead, I go by HRM...

  8. #8
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    I don't tend to use mine much anymore, only when I head out on a long ride (just to see how far i have really gone)

  9. #9
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    I don't but only because I don't have one yet. I do use various iPhone apps on ocassion. I'm not concerned about the numbers but like Opus51569 said its nice to analaze the data.

  10. #10
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    Some of you have just inspired me to ditch my computer; didn't use it much anyway but still looked at it too much while riding; should be enjoying the scenery.

  11. #11
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by enzo24 View Post
    I guess I need the computer as a reminder of how hard I should be trying.
    But that could bring up the question: why are you trying so hard? Not saying there aren't any good answers to that. But it can be a legitimate question for some of us.

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    I use a heart rate monitor

    Sometimes I ride with a wireless Mavic WIN without cadence or HRM.

    Sometimes I ride with the Mavic and a handlebar mounted Polar HRM.

    Sometimes I ride with just the HRM.

    It is good to mix it up a bit.

    I started road riding in the late 1960's. I purchased and installed one of those mechanical odometers that was activated by a prong that was attached to a spoke. The little prong actually touched the odometer each time the wheel went around and made it advance. The odometer was attached to the front fork and the mileage was read by looking down and reading the 1/4" tall numbers. It was fairly accurate. If I remember correctly it read in tenths of a mile. This small, simple device could be called a predecessor to the digital cycling computer. It was strictly an odometer and did not give a speed readout.

  13. #13
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    I used to have a computer on all of my bikes. But over time, one by one, they would crap out on me, and I was getting tired of replacing them. So now I don't have computers on any of my bikes. I'm not into analyzing my riding, so I don't miss them that much. I do keep a log of my rides, so the only statistic I need is total miles, which I can easily figure out with a mapping program.
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  14. #14
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    Used from day one

    I remember using one I got through the mail. It was big and clunky, about the size of a ciggarette pack. Iater I starting using the Avocet, the first really small one I believe. The ones in the showcase always read "58 seconds" to comemorate LeMonds 1990 Tour victory.

    I don't wear a watch, so a computer is at the very least a handy clock. And who wants a sweaty watch and a white tan line?

    A bike computer is also useful at time trials and for training. Many riders use Garmins to gauge their fitness, routes,and times. I use my Signa 1609 during a time trial to maintain a pace I've set for myself.

    Side note: The seasons last TT was last night. Myself and three others set personal bests.

    At this stage of the season everyone is in pretty good shape. Fitness goals have been met. Our rides don't have to be taken to the bank. Every ride doesn't need to be an investment in conditioning.
    My 1996 Miata is my other "road bike"

  15. #15
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    I prefer to ride with a computer.

    feels like something is missing without it.

    like current speed, max speed, avg speed, distance traveled, elapsed time...
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  16. #16
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    I don't really look at it much as i ride, just occasionally to see my current speed. But afterwards, I like reviewing my average speed and how long I was riding, plus not knowing how far i've gone would drive me nuts. I don't get depressed if it's slower than I thought or anything, I'm just curious.

  17. #17
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    I rode with a computer for about a year, and then lost the spoke magnet. After another year without the thing, I finally got around to replacing the spoke magnet, and have now had the Cateye Strada Wireless back on my bars for about two weeks... for me, it takes my regular commute and turns it into a game. I'm racing against my time, and my own average speed across my 6 mile commute. Definitely missed having it for the past year.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbydeethree View Post

    I started road riding in the late 1960's. I purchased and installed one of those mechanical odometers that was activated by a prong that was attached to a spoke. The little prong actually touched the odometer each time the wheel went around and made it advance. The odometer was attached to the front fork and the mileage was read by looking down and reading the 1/4" tall numbers.
    It was made by Lucas. The clicking drove everyone crazy.
    My 1996 Miata is my other "road bike"

  19. #19
    QED
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    I look more at cadence rather than speed. I have been trying to increase my lung capacity by spinning more and mashing less. Typically, I live in no man's land though, but I have a goal and the computer gives me a way to measure if I actually hit it.

    I do look at speed occasionally, mostly on hills. I am just really learning and hills have been my most difficult thing to master, both up and down, and the computer helps with that. On the uphill, I pay attention to what gear I am in and keeping my cadence up. On the downhill, I pay attention to what speed I am going when I reach that point of abject fear, which is where the edge of out-of-control begins. I never want to be out of control, but I do want to push myself to face my fear and ride faster in control. My computer helps me do that.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bikie View Post
    It was made by Lucas. The clicking drove everyone crazy.
    Slightly higher tech was the one I got in the early 70's. The Huret multito was a mechanical cyclometer that attached to the front axle, but unlike the Lucas it had a pulley driven by a tiny belt, so no clicking.
    "None of us knows for sure what's out there; that's why we keep looking. Keep your faith; travel hopefully. The universe will surprise you, constantly." The 13th Doctor.

  21. #21
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    I use an iPhone with Strava. Works really well.

  22. #22
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    I use my phone with Strava to track my rides, but that's in the pack under my seat while I'm out. I would love to use a computer to see how fast I'm going while training but I don't have one. I HAD one on my old bike but sold it with the bike. It was a cheap one anyway, I didn't really trust it.

    I'd like to get a new one though. I find that I push myself harder when I know I'm going too slow. I mainly ride for fitness, so going hard is what I'd like to do.
    Felt Z85

  23. #23
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    I understand the freedom some of you obtain without a computer. It seems to have ensnared you into a numbers game, always demanding faster, longer results. Returning to cycling in retirement, I'm pleased to have a computer. It displays the time, speed (I never knew that before), distance covered, elapsed time, average and max speeds. When I'm looking to ride 30 to 45 miles, and curious about my speed (under 19mph, and with some groups, under 13mph), it's easy to refer to the computer.

    Almost all my riding is for pure enjoyment. If the computer interfered with that, I'd ditch it.

  24. #24
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    Man, that is a trick little gizmo. The little belt on the Huret multito was quite an advancement.

    Huret was designed and manufactured in France, wasn't it?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbydeethree View Post
    Man, that is a trick little gizmo. The little belt on the Huret multito was quite an advancement.

    Huret was designed and manufactured in France, wasn't it?
    Oui. . . .
    "None of us knows for sure what's out there; that's why we keep looking. Keep your faith; travel hopefully. The universe will surprise you, constantly." The 13th Doctor.

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