OCLV Tubing
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Thread: OCLV Tubing

  1. #1
    B2
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    OCLV Tubing

    There was some discussion about the source of the OCLV tubing not too long ago. I was in the LBS shop yesterday and one of the guys told me that the tubing (not the lugs) are made by MacLean Quality Composites out of West Jordon, UT (pretty close to SLC as mentioned earlier). http://www.macqc.com/

    For those of you who don't know, this is the company that purchased the rights to the Lew wheels. I'm not exactly sure what the affiliation is, but they have some kind of arrangement (ownership?) with Reynolds for the production of cycling related products.

    So there you have it.

    Bryan

    BTW - Per the Reynolds website the only thing that Lew and Reynolds wheels have in common is the molding process. The Reynolds rims have an entirely different profile.

  2. #2

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    I want some of those Stratus clinchers. They're so sweet

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    Quote Originally Posted by B2
    I was in the LBS shop yesterday and one of the guys told me that the tubing (not the lugs) are made by MacLean Quality Composites out of West Jordon, UT (pretty close to SLC as mentioned earlier). http://www.macqc.com/
    Pretty cool. Thanks B2

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    I noticed during the repaint of my oclv

    where the tubes join the lugs there's a line of glue or epoxy coming from the joint. Has anyone heard of the lugs coming loose from the tubes at these joints?

  5. #5
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    I've heard of something else though

    Quote Originally Posted by mr meow meow
    where the tubes join the lugs there's a line of glue or epoxy coming from the joint. Has anyone heard of the lugs coming loose from the tubes at these joints?
    One of my friends has the 5900 that is only 2 years old and it has a crack on the non-drive chainstay. He is mainly a mountain biker and has 8 other bikes that he rides. If anything, he is probably the gentlest with the 5900. He works at a Trek dealer and Trek doesn't want to honor their lifetime warrantee. They are giving him a real hard time about it. I've known people to buy Treks for thier warrenty as opposed to other carbon bikes, but with this news my respect for Trek has taken a downturn. Anyone got any ideas on how to help him out?

  6. #6
    But it's a dry heat...
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    There must be something more to the story...

    Quote Originally Posted by niteschaos
    One of my friends has the 5900 that is only 2 years old and it has a crack on the non-drive chainstay. He is mainly a mountain biker and has 8 other bikes that he rides. If anything, he is probably the gentlest with the 5900. He works at a Trek dealer and Trek doesn't want to honor their lifetime warrantee. They are giving him a real hard time about it. I've known people to buy Treks for thier warrenty as opposed to other carbon bikes, but with this news my respect for Trek has taken a downturn. Anyone got any ideas on how to help him out?

    ...than you are letting on. Trek is infamous for their customer care. I know 2 LBS's who are Trek dealers and they rave about their warranty responsiveness. So why would Trek try to screw an employee of a shop who sells their products when they will take care of the general public? Something doesn't add up here. What is Trek's reason for not fixing the frame? Did he crash on it?

    Thx...Doug

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    Beats me

    I just know that the guy is a good mechanic and has been riding bikes since he could fit on them. From the story he told me, he was cleaning it last week and the rag got hung on something on the chainstay and when he looked closer there was a crack. Trek said that they think he must of stepped on the chainstay because they just don't crack on their own.

    Facts:
    Bike has a cracked nondrive chainstay.
    Bike has never been crashed.
    Bike is one of 8 that he rides.

    Factual Issues:
    How hard does he ride on the road? (don't know but he's only 145 pounds)
    How rough are the roads in Atlanta? (moderate to crappy)
    How is the bike stored? (leaned against a wall or on rooftop fork mount during travel)?

    Conceptual Issues:
    How "hard" is hard riding?
    What do you concider rough roads?
    Did you mean "famous" or "infamous" on your previous post?

    Ethical Issues:
    If everyone is telling the truth here, then Trek is an ass. If the local Trek rep isn't an ass, then I don't know enough details.

  8. #8
    But it's a dry heat...
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    Something still doesn't add up

    Quote Originally Posted by niteschaos
    I just know that the guy is a good mechanic and has been riding bikes since he could fit on them. From the story he told me, he was cleaning it last week and the rag got hung on something on the chainstay and when he looked closer there was a crack. Trek said that they think he must of stepped on the chainstay because they just don't crack on their own.

    Facts:
    Bike has a cracked nondrive chainstay.
    Bike has never been crashed.
    Bike is one of 8 that he rides.

    Factual Issues:
    How hard does he ride on the road? (don't know but he's only 145 pounds)
    How rough are the roads in Atlanta? (moderate to crappy)
    How is the bike stored? (leaned against a wall or on rooftop fork mount during travel)?

    Conceptual Issues:
    How "hard" is hard riding?
    What do you concider rough roads?
    Did you mean "famous" or "infamous" on your previous post?

    Ethical Issues:
    If everyone is telling the truth here, then Trek is an ass. If the local Trek rep isn't an ass, then I don't know enough details.
    Something still isn't adding up. Trek is known for their customer service ("famous", thanks for correcting me!) so the facts as you present them and the response by Trek make absolutely no sense. Add to this the fact that your friend works for a Trek dealership and the reasoning gets even more cloudy. Why would Trek want to screw over one of their dealerships (who also sell other brands of bikes)? That would only make the dealership steer new customers away from Trek and towards other brands so as to avoid warranty headaches in the future.

    My friend broke his Trek Fuel mountain bike frame. Trek replaced it without question. And that's a mountain bike, which is much different than a road bike in that rider abuse can be claimed by the manufacturer (i.e. crashing always happens on mountain bikes).

    Other people I know have had their Trek mountain bikes fixed without issue. And the dealers around here claim that Trek has been great at fixing any of their bikes, road or mountain.

    Is your friend giving you all of the information?

    Or maybe the local rep has a vendetta against your friend and now the rep is trying to get back at him?

    Weird.

    Thx...Doug

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    Here's what i personally know of treks warrant repair service...

    Summer 2000: Rode my '99 Trek 8000 in a stupid way down a hill, folded up the downtube. Replaced for free, even though clearly rider error (although this may be because i lived in whitewater, wisconsin where trek has a factory, and it was taken in by an employee friend)

    Fall 2003: I think the clear coat on my 2300 frame was poorly applied and flaking off. the mechanic at the trek dealer thought it was my fault from setting it down, said he'd send it in anyway, but i shouldn't expect them to do anything out of it. came back repainted, and it wasn't what i was expecting (it was all black with 2 trek decals and a uncentered headtube badge. looked like crap, IMHO, not the flashy bike i wanted). trek is currently repainting it again for me, for free, in a different paint scheme.


    I think their customer/warranty service is great!

  10. #10
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    trek customer service....

    unrelated to my original question, but when I tried to get replacement decals for my 5500 I had to jump through more hoops than your typical circus clown. They first claimed they had none in stock....Wait...NO decals sets in stock at ALL? That turned out to be false as the THIRD bike shop I went to was successful... but at a price. two week wait and a $65 charge... ouch!!

    I shoulda put a cat decal on instead

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    Trek Warranty

    Trek can be very slow in honoring their lifetime warranty. I work at a Trek dealer and have heard a few unpleasant stories, but every single one was solved by keeping at them. Naturally they don't want to give out a "free" bike, but they will if you push hard enough.

  12. #12
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    Angry Trek 5900 problem

    I have a 2001 trek 5900 and the point where the top tubes meets the metal stop for the brake cable has completed corroded and the paint is ruined (literally bulbed up) in an area that is five inches in diameter. The metal stop is completed corroded. My LBS contacted Trek and they quickly said that they only warrant paint for a year and they would repaint it for me for $400. The interesting thing is that I was very careful with this bike and had waxed it a half dozen times trying to keep the paint looking good. When I originally showed it to my LBS there response was "let's wait and see if it get's worse". Well it did and Trek bowed out of their warrantly. Not something you would expect when you buy Trek's top of the line bike.

  13. #13
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    Wax all you want...

    Quote Originally Posted by dangri
    I have a 2001 trek 5900 and the point where the top tubes meets the metal stop for the brake cable has completed corroded and the paint is ruined (literally bulbed up) in an area that is five inches in diameter. The metal stop is completed corroded. My LBS contacted Trek and they quickly said that they only warrant paint for a year and they would repaint it for me for $400. The interesting thing is that I was very careful with this bike and had waxed it a half dozen times trying to keep the paint looking good. When I originally showed it to my LBS there response was "let's wait and see if it get's worse". Well it did and Trek bowed out of their warrantly. Not something you would expect when you buy Trek's top of the line bike.
    FWIW you can wax a bike all you want but know that cable stops are a notorious spot for paint issues on any frame. Sweat and all other bad for your paint kinda' stuff accumulate there and no amount of waxing can get it out. Dilligent cleaning of the bikes and remove of cables to clean the area is necessary. I speak from experience as a shop nerd, former Trek OCLV owner, and most of all world champion sweat hog.

    I don't know that this is what happened but go ahead and b!tch slap the dealer that told you to wait as once paint bubbles there it will only get worse typically. It sounds like they hoped you'd forget it and save them hassle or where just plain lazy. If they truly told you to wait then you have an issue with tthe shop's service department. I'd suggest having a come to jesus talk with the shop about what they can do, including calm but succinct reminder that they told you to wait. If you do it right then hopefully they start to squirm over the thought of this costing them money. When that happens you can bet they'll be more assertive with Trek.

    Now one last thing, if they are a bunch of gutless turds than Trek and there local rep already know it. In other words part of what is happening to you could be leftover crap from past interactions with the shop. There are plenty of dealers that Trek keeps on because thtey have limited alternatives. It happens with every bike company. It just so happens that smaller, less prestigious companies have more sh!t dealers than Trek or other big names.

  14. #14
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    Trek

    After my 5900 got creamed by a car I asked Trek for a new one for free since it was my 9th OCLV and I explained how hard I work to promote their bikes even though I don't work for them. They laughed at first but then offered me 400$ for a new frame at cost to the LBS

    The frame and fork held up great by the way and Trek asked me to mail it to them so they could x-ray it. Only the fork broke in two places but the frame warped but never broke. It was a 2001 5900 with about 16K on it

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    Another useful thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by dangri
    I have a 2001 trek 5900 and the point where the top tubes meets the metal stop for the brake cable has completed corroded and the paint is ruined (literally bulbed up) in an area that is five inches in diameter. The metal stop is completed corroded. My LBS contacted Trek and they quickly said that they only warrant paint for a year and they would repaint it for me for $400. The interesting thing is that I was very careful with this bike...
    This problem is quite common. Many OCLV Treks (5200, 5500,5900) are afflicted with this very problem. Trek is aware of it.

    Their policy: this is a paint issue, not a frame issue, so no warranty will apply.

    There's an obvious issue with the paint/clear coat on many of these OCLV bikes and, if it happens to yours, Trek will do nothing.

    So much for "incredible customer service".

    -PV

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    You've been compensated, hence compromised!

    Quote Originally Posted by CARBON110
    After my 5900 got creamed by a car I asked Trek for a new one for free since it was my 9th OCLV and I explained how hard I work to promote their bikes even though I don't work for them. They laughed at first but then offered me 400$ for a new frame at cost to the LBS
    SO...

    ... you made a tangible profit as a direct result of your "rah-rah Trek is great" propaganda on RBR?

    That's not right!

    I hope that everyone who reads your posts in reference to Trek knows this in advance.



    -PV

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    I hear an endorsement

    Quote Originally Posted by plus_vite
    This problem is quite common. Many OCLV Treks (5200, 5500,5900) are afflicted with this very problem. Trek is aware of it.
    So one solution to this just might be Ti?

  18. #18
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    2 things here...

    i think there is something else going on here as well. an oclv frame will not just crack unless something pretty major has happened. i've had the opportunity to really abuse these frames, and it's pretty amazing what you can do to one before you create any visible damage.
    i have had many experiences w/ trek warranty service. all have been positive. the oclv frames are incredibly strong, i've never seen a tube/lug joint come apart. i've sold all sorts of carbon frames, (trek, look, colnago, derosa, merckx, calfee, parlee, scott, etc), and the oclv frame is very high quality.
    paint can be a problem on cable stops, just because the stick out from the frame and tend to catch on things, and the cable can rub against the stop and wear the paint away. at that point it doesn't take much sweat, or salt water to start a corrosion problem. if you know you sweat a lot, and you might have more corrosive sweat than most, you should know that you need to clean your bike regularly w/ at least clear water, better w/ soap. this doesn't strike me as a "paint problem", there are thousands of other frames out there painted w/ the same product that don't have problems. sounds more like a sweat problem. if you sweat all over your bike, wash it right after you're done riding.
    Last edited by cxwrench; 01-26-2005 at 09:00 PM.

  19. #19
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    Same problem with the paint here

    This has happend three times. Once on my original OCLV of the late 90's and twice on my 2001 OCLV (It's happening again after a repaint). There's really no excuse for this happening on a 'factory' paint job. None. I understand the vulnerability of this area of the frame to sweat, friction, corrosion and impact, but the paint simply 'bubbling' up after a year or so is not acceptable when countless other manufacturers don't have the same problem. Over the last decade they should have developed an epoxy or whatever as an additive to that area of the paint job to stave off any decay. I know it's gonna happen but it should last longer.
    are you having fun?...

  20. #20
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    "i think there is something else going on here as well. an oclv frame will not just crack unless something pretty major has happened. i've had the opportunity to really abuse these frames, and it's pretty amazing what you can do to one before you create any visible damage."

    Not defending the original post, but any frame of any material can have a defect. - TF
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
    Me, off the back, at my first 50+ road race.

  21. #21

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    A "sweat problem"????

    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench
    an oclv frame will not just crack unless something pretty major has happened.

    there are thousands of other frames out there painted w/ the same product that don't have problems. sounds more like a sweat problem. if you sweat all over your bike, wash it right after you're done riding.
    First, I've never said anything negative about the strength of the modern Trek OCLV frames. (The older Trek Aluminum/ CF composite bikes were known to fail) My complaint is about this nagging paint issue. And it is a paint issue!

    Let me read your own words back to you: "there are thousands of other frames out there painted w/ the same product that don't have problems."

    Trek is selling bicycles. People who ride bicycles sweat! Trek never issued a caveat to buyers that said, in effect, "don't sweat or, if you do and don't clean it properly, damage to our paint job will not be covered by warranty."

    Other manufacturers are selling carbon fiber bikes and they don't have this problem. So there you go.

    Caveat emptor.

    -PV

  22. #22
    NeoRetroGrouch
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    According to my Trek tour guide, the Madone tubing as well as the lugs are made in Warterloo. They would not show us the carbon fabrication area. - TF
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
    Me, off the back, at my first 50+ road race.

  23. #23
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    no kidding...

    Quote Originally Posted by plus_vite
    Trek is selling bicycles. People who ride bicycles sweat! Trek never issued a caveat to buyers that said, in effect, "don't sweat or, if you do and don't clean it properly, damage to our paint job will not be covered by warranty."

    Other manufacturers are selling carbon fiber bikes and they don't have this problem. So there you go.

    Caveat emptor.

    -PV
    what i'm saying is that there are thousands of other frames out there w/ their riders sweating all over them and not having problems. it's that individuals sweat that is possibly causing the problem...pay attention.

    and, how do you know that other manufacturers don't have the same problems? i've seen it happen to any number of bikes, aluminum, steel, and carbon.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboTurtle
    According to my Trek tour guide, the Madone tubing as well as the lugs are made in Warterloo. They would not show us the carbon fabrication area. - TF
    Here's a glimpse....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  25. #25

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    Just reporting the facts.

    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench
    and, how do you know that other manufacturers don't have the same problems? i've seen it happen to any number of bikes, aluminum, steel, and carbon.
    I am just reporting the facts. There are a lot of Trek 5xxx bikes out there and, as a result, when a problem like this surfaces to on x% of their products, people are gonna take notice.

    That said, this is a well known problem and Trek's stand on their warranty is as I have stated it.

    Is this happening to other bicycles? I've seen and inspected many, many bicycles in my life. I've seen bikes that are immaculately cleaned and many whose owners keep them so dirty that it is practically abuse.

    Still, I've never seen anything quite like this paint problem on some of these Trek 5xxx products. It just looks awful.

    -PV

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