Other Elitist Cycling Terms - Page 2
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  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by g8keyper
    Tschai,

    I am a newbie and just want to ensure I am not doing something wrong. I always say "On your left / On your right" when riding local paved parks and such because when I am passing a person running, walking, or biking you can't tell if they might stop, go left or right suddenly (wearing headphone they can't hear a bike) or they maybe coming up on someone around the corner so they move left or right ... does saying "On your left / right not make it safer? I can't imagine hitting a person running and think it would probably hurt someone pretty bad.
    No, you are doing the right thing. Although non-cyclists may not understand exactly what you are saying.

    Reviewing my post, I really should have used the term "inside" instead of "on your left/right." I was refering to cornering in packs and/or races when people yell "inside, inside".

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by g8keyper
    Tschai,

    I am a newbie and just want to ensure I am not doing something wrong. I always say "On your left / On your right" when riding local paved parks and such because when I am passing a person running, walking, or biking you can't tell if they might stop, go left or right suddenly (wearing headphone they can't hear a bike) or they maybe coming up on someone around the corner so they move left or right ... does saying "On your left / right not make it safer? I can't imagine hitting a person running and think it would probably hurt someone pretty bad.
    Instead of saying "on your left" just say "passing" if you say on your left you could get yourself into trouble. Often when saying that the ped. will actualy move left into your path. Sometimes they will move left, then correct and move right. Say you perceived their move to the left and changed your path to pass on the right and you two collide. Well, you communicated you'd pass on the left, didn't and it caused an accident.

    Saying "passing" or using a bell will minimize your commitment and allow you to pass wherever is safest.

    But slow down a bit when passing peds. Have they got a dog? A kid? Pass extra slow. If you need to go fast stick to the streets not the multi purpose paths. Your legs will like the powering back up to speed anyway.

    check out some of the advocacy websites for more tips. http://bicyclecolo.org/index.cfm

  3. #28
    Does it matter?
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    dictionary of roadie slang link


  4. #29
    Albert Owen
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY
    All show and no go -- A not so good rider with a state of the art bike and gear.
    .
    That's me

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tschai
    No, you are doing the right thing. Although non-cyclists may not understand exactly what you are saying.

    Reviewing my post, I really should have used the term "inside" instead of "on your left/right." I was refering to cornering in packs and/or races when people yell "inside, inside".
    Well it depends entirely on the situation. On a multi-purpose path? I would say it every single time and pass slowly. On the streets? Usually. On the open road it depends on the rider, if they see me and a bunch of other factors.

  6. #31
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    I don't see the elitism.

    Ithink that this thread is kind of going along two different paths. Some things that people brought up are obviously not elitist (powerbarf). Others are the sort of thing present in any sport. The only thing that may be more prevalent is the calling of attention to a discrepancy between a rider's ability and equipment, something that isn't quite as common in running or other sports which require very limited equipment. Anyway, I think that we as cyclists are often too sensitive to this sort of thing.

  7. #32
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    "Chatty Cathy" A rider who always shows up for club rides, always likes to ride right next to you, and never shuts up for an instant. He/she can keep talking no matter how high the pace goes.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Versatile
    "Chatty Cathy" A rider who always shows up for club rides, always likes to ride right next to you, and never shuts up for an instant. He/she can keep talking no matter how high the pace goes.
    i think this one is subjective... it's only aparent when you're on the rivit

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